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About This Collection The Yiddish language sheet music in this digital collection is part of the large Sheet Music Collection at the John Hay Library. The digital collection is composed of public domain (pre-1923) titles; when the project is completed it is expected that it will be comprised of approximately 700 titles. Most of the Yiddish sheet music in the collection came from the collection of Menache Vaxer, a Yiddish writer and Hebraist of Russia, and was acquired by the Library in 1968, which included over 850 pieces of piano-vocal or instrumental music, dating from the 1890s through the 1940s. This core collection has been added to by purchase and gift since that time, and the entire Yiddish sheet music collection now totals approximately 2000 items.

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Tufts College: A Wartime Campus, 1943-1946 Welcome to Tufts College: A Wartime Campus , the second exhibit in a series created by the Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives. This exhibit explores the experience of students attending Tufts College during World War II. Raising of Colors This online exhibit was created in conjunction with an exhibit on display in the Tisch Library from April until September 2001. Both exhibits were designed by Amanda Yost, G2001. The entire series of exhibits has been funded by a committee of alumni and veterans of the U.S. Navy programs that were on Tufts' campus from 1941-1972.

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Tufts College: Graduates in Wartime Welcome to Tufts College: Graduates in Wartime , the third exhibit in a series created by the Tufts University Digital Collections and Archives. This exhibit explores the transition many Tufts College students made from student to Naval Officer during the fighting of World War II. This online exhibit was created in conjunction with an exhibit on display in the Tisch Library from January until September 2002. The physical exhibit was designed and mounted by Tatiana Sizonenko, and the web exhibit was created by Patricia Hughes G2000. The entire series of exhibits has been funded by a committee of alumni and veterans of the U.S.

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  This web exhibit is an electronic version of an exhibit mounted in the Tisch Library located on Tufts University's Medford Campus. The exhibit will run from October, 2000 through March, 2001. Funding for the exhibits is provided by Tufts alumni who were part of the United States Navy Officer Training Programs on the Medford Campus from 1941-1972. The exhibit was designed and mounted by Patricia Hughes, G2000. Material used in this exhibit is now housed in the Digital Collections and Archives.      

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Somerville/Cambridge Latino Community History Project The Somerville/Cambridge Latino Community History Project documents the arrival and integration of the Latino community in Somerville and Cambridge, Massachusetts through interviews, recorded oral histories and field research. Tufts undergraduate students in Deborah Pacini Hernandez's Anthropology 183 class Urban Borderlands, working in conjunction with Latino high school students from Somerville's Welcome Project and Cambridge's Ahora program, have been exploring the history and development of Latino communities in the area.

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Muriel Simonson at Jackson College 1924-1929: a biographical exhibit Welcome to the online biographical exhibit about Muriel Simonson, who had been an exceptionally talented student of Jackson College, Tufts University, in the 1920s. This exhibit highlights Muriel's academic and athletic achievements and the fact that she was the first undergraduate theater producer (male or female) at Tufts University while also documenting her much-lauded acting and singing. Muriel Simonson's years at Jackson College are presented within the larger institutional, historical, economic, and gender contexts of her time.

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  When Donald Winslow (A34, MA35), contacted the Digital Collections and Archives in 2007, we decided to create an autobiographical online exhibit containing his memories of Tufts. I had just completed an exhibit about Muriel Simonson (A'29) . A few years younger than Muriel, Donald Winslow and John Holmes (A'29) , Muriel's fiancee, were contemporaries at Tufts, with John Holmes first working as assistant in English at Tufts and then returning as instructor of English in 1934 when Donald began his MA in English.

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Walter B. Wriston (August 3, 1919 - January 19, 2005) was a banker and former chairman of Citicorp. An expert on commercial banking, Mr. Wriston wrote and spoke widely on topics relating to finance, banking, technology, and international business. Mr. Wriston's career at Citibank/Citicorp spanned nearly forty years. He joined the company in 1946 as a Junior Inspector in the Comptroller's Division. He was assigned to the bank's Overseas Division in 1956, heading the European District for three years, and was named a Senior Vice President in 1958. Mr. Wriston became President and Chief Executive Officer of the bank in 1967 and of the corporation when it was formed in 1968.

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When this project is complete it will include all 25 states and territories that existed at the time. Please keep in mind that this project is a work in progress. The elections for the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island, South Carolina and Tennessee contain all of the data that Philip Lampi has collected and are now available in Version 1.0. All other states are still being worked on and elections will be made available as data entry is completed. Some of the states with incomplete election data will be made available in a beta version. Some states might not be available while entry is ongoing.

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Visit Cowpaths (opens a new window)   View all Boston Streets images (Using the Tufts Digital Library)   Browse all Boston city atlases (Using the Tufts Digital Library)     The Project: Boston Streets: Mapping Directory data was developed by the Digital Collections and Archives, Tufts University, with support from a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services . Additional support was provided by Docema, The Bostonian Society , and other anonymous gifts. The Bostonian Society provided more than 3000 images to the project and was also a major partner in developing descriptive cataloging specifications.

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Holmes was a part of many different and overlapping worlds. His poetry and other literary endeavors constitute one such world, but there were also worlds of family, friends, colleagues, his lifetime relationship with Tufts, as well as the realities of the larger world. These exhibits provide insights into some parts of Holmes' world, primarily through his poetry.

As a teacher and mentor of young poets, Holmes was concerned about imparting the work of writing poetry to his students. Using drafts and notes as well as letters and sketches which are contained in the collection, this exhibit traces the evolution of several poems from first draft to finished product.

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was born May 28, 1894 in Sterling, Massachusetts. One of four children, Donald had an older sister and brother, Josephine and Malcolm, and a younger sister Jean. A graduate of Medford High School, class of 1912 and Tufts College, class of 1916, Donald turned his love of modern languages into a profession of school teacher. These two interests led him to France in 1920, onto Germany in 1922, and then back to France. He opened a school in 1924 in St. Cloud outside of Paris and firmly established himself in the realm of international education in France.

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Edward R. Murrow (1908-1965) is best known as a CBS broadcaster and producer during the formative years of U.S. radio and television news programs from the 1930s to the 1950s, when radio still dominated the airwaves although television was beginning to make its indelible mark, particularly in the US. Over the decades, numerous publications have portrayed Murrow as one of the architects of U.S. broadcast news, but in the political climate of recent years, he is increasingly viewed as a defender of rights against McCarthy-type witch hunts. The Life and Work of Edward R. Murrow is an online exhibit featuring Murrow's career from his student days to his work for USIA.

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History of Medicine About a hundred years ago, public health took a visual turn. In an era of devastating epidemic and endemic infectious disease, health professionals began to organize coordinated campaigns that sought to mobilize public action through eye-catching wall posters, illustrated pamphlets, motion pictures, and glass slide projections. Impressed by the images of mass media that increasingly saturated the world around them, health campaigners were inspired to present new figures of contagion, and recycle old ones, using modernist aesthetics, graphic manipulations, humor, dramatic lighting, painterly abstraction, distortions of perspective, and other visual strategies.

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History of Medicine Introduction 引言 Tuberculosis was one of the major epidemic diseases in 20th-century China, along with smallpox, malaria, cholera, schistosomiasis, and other epidemics. Organized efforts to fight the disease began in 1933 when the National Anti-Tuberculosis Association of China was established. From 1950 through 1980, the Chinese government launched anti-tuberculosis campaigns as part of the national public health movement. The Anti-TB Association and the Red Cross played important roles in the health education campaigns. Health posters became an important tool to disseminate health knowledge and methods of prevention and treatment. The campaigns, along with the universal free healthcare, led to a significant decline of tuberculosis.

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Medicine in the Old World arose from many components: the classical Greek tradition, its Christian re-elaboration, the contributions of the Arabic World, and the unique medieval synthesis of them all. By examining significant pages and illuminations from manuscripts and early printed books of the National Library of Medicine, one can see how these cultures contributed to the creation of medical knowledge in Europe.

These pages are a journey through time and space, as medical knowledge moved around and across the Mediterranean Sea. Mare nostrum—Our Sea—divided societies into several groups, but it could be crossed, making cultural contact, trade, and the exchange of ideas possible.

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History of Medicine The Letters  | Life, Family, and Times  | Henkel Family Heritage  | Colophon , , , , U.S. National Library of Medicine, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894 , Last reviewed: 26 July 2011 Last updated: 26 July 2011 First published: 14 June 2010 | : Permanent: Dynamic Content

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History of Medicine Chinese medicinal compounds were recorded as early as the Han dynasty, 2,000 years ago. Beginning in the 1880s, Western companies – notably Bayer, Hoechst (now Aventis), and Eli Lilly – challenged traditional medicine with the resources of modern capitalism. In turn, Chinese companies entered the new commercial markets: the Tianjin Pharmaceutical Factory, founded in 1921, used western methods to produce and market traditional Chinese medicines. The sheets shown here advertise a mix of European and Asian products, using ideal feminine and masculine images as well as the Tian An Men (Gate of Heavenly Peace). Ads for progesterone and methyltestosterone show the appeal of potent over-the-counter hormone therapies. 21 April 2010

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History of Medicine Many histories have been written about medical care during the American Civil War, but the participation and contributions of African Americans as nurses, surgeons and hospital workers have often been overlooked. Binding Wounds, Pushing Boundaries: African Americans in Civil War Medicine looks at the men and women who served as surgeons and nurses and how their work as medical providers challenged the prescribed notions of race and gender. Explore the exhibition online , use the educational resources in the classroom or find out if the traveling exhibition is coming to a local library near you. Find Resources Explore the Exhibition See it Near You 04 October 2010

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History of Medicine EVER SINCE THE INVENTION OF moveable type in the mid-1400s, the public’s appetite for tales of shocking murders —“true crime” —has been an enduring aspect of the market for printed material. For more than five centuries, murder pamphlets have been hawked on street corners, town squares, taverns, coffeehouses, news stands, and book shops. Typically, a local printer would put together a pamphlet that claimed to be a true account of a murder, consisting of a narrative, trial transcript, and/or written confession of the murderer before his or her execution. 13 September 2010

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History of Medicine Public Health And War Public health and war have long been close companions, and maybe strange bedfellows. Starting with the Crimean War, and then the first terrible round of "modern wars" -- the American Civil War, the Franco-Prussian War and World War I -- military officials and civilian leaders called on health professionals and volunteers to help mobilize and protect military forces and civilian populations. Health professionals and volunteers, in turn, viewed war as an opportunity to test and implement their theories, as an opportunity to use newly discovered knowledge and newly invented technologies -- and eagerly jumped on war bandwagons to advance their professional, scientific, political and ideological goals.

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The perspectives of surgeons, physicians, and nurses are richly documented in the history of Civil War medicine, which highlights the heroism and brutality of battlefield operations and the challenges of caring for the wounded during wartime. Yet the experiences of injured soldiers during the conflict and in the years afterwards are less well-known. Life and Limb: The Toll of the Civil War focuses on disabled veterans and their role as symbols of the fractured nation.

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Exhibition Healing Ways Uncover how diverse lifestyles and shared experiences have helped sustain the health and well-being of Native populations for generations. Hōkūle‘a Native Hawaiians owe their existence to the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe. Its resurgence in the last century has led to a cultural revival, inspiring Native Hawaiians of all ages to learn more about, and to value, their traditions. Healing Totem The National Library of Medicine’s healing totem was created by master carver Jewell James, of the Lummi Nation in the Pacific Northwest, to promote good health.

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History of Medicine Introduction The National Library of Medicine's Bathtub Collection is an archive of materials found in the old bindings when rare books in the Library were conserved. The materials found in the bindings include fragments of old printed books or manuscript materials which are often treasures on their own. In the Bathtub Collection, NLM has organized and described these fragments and made them available to scholars. The story of the Bathtub Collection begins in the middle of the last century. In the 1940's, The Army Medical Library, as the National Library of Medicine was then known, began a serious conservation program for its rare book collection. The AML hired Dorothy Schullian as curator of rare books and Jean Eschman, a master bookbinder from Switzerland.

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History of Medicine The tragedy of the AIDS epidemic brought about an outpouring of items, intended to educate the public about the disease and its consequences. Starting in the early 1980s—AIDS was first identified in 1981—the initial response to the disease generated ephemeral public health materials, such as buttons, posters, cards, comic books, and even lunch boxes. Since AIDS was both incurable and invariably fatal, these messages of prevention were the only effective steps that public health officials could take. Produced by government health departments as well as private organizations, these ephemeral objects became an important medium for messages of awareness, prevention, compassion, and responsibility.

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History of Medicine Español - Italiano Healing and faith have always played a role in the lives of the faithful. They are interwoven in the fabric of social history. How we regard illness and healing, and how we cope with them have captured our imagination throughout the ages. The expression of our relationship with illness is wonderfully illustrated in the ex-voto, a devotional painting giving thanks to a saint or deity for a miraculous healing or a blessing. The faithful have always used prayer to invoke the aid of saints as a means to heal the sick and end one's suffering. These devotional paintings are an individual's expression of thanks for the intercession of the divine in a crisis, a snapshot in time of illness and healing.

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History of Medicine Robert Hooke (1635-1703) was a remarkably versatile man — artist, biologist, physicist, engineer, architect, inventor, and more. However, his crowning glory was Micrographia: or Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses , first published 1665. It was a masterpiece — an exquisitely illustrated introduction to the previously unknown microscopic world. This exhibit focuses on Hooke's influences and legacy in print, the pioneering books that stimulated Hooke's research, and the works he left for others — most famously the great Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhœk (1632-1723). August 1 – November 1, 2007.

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History of Medicine Guide to Tropical Disease Motion Pictures and Audiovisuals Introduction The Tropical Disease Motion Picture and Audiovisual Collection is comprised of films, videorecordings, and digital videocasts produced from the 1920s through 2009, with the majority shot prior to the 1960s. All are devoted to health concerns and include material on medicine and public health. Materials range from ideological, documentary, educational, and training films to American war propaganda. The intended audience is diverse and includes military personnel, health professionals, and the general public.

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History of Medicine Charlotte Perkins Gilman writing at her desk, ca. 1916-1922 Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, author and physician, 1906 Charlotte's doctor, nerve specialist Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, had built an eminent medical career working with soldiers injured during the Civil War. He then focused on the treatment of women with nervous exhaustion, devising a “rest cure” in which the patient was not allowed to read, write, feed herself, or talk to others.

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History of Medicine Introduction Malaria was historically a major threat to the health of the Chinese people. In 1950, over 30 million Chinese people suffered from malaria and one percent of them died. The Chinese government launched national campaigns against malaria in the early 1950s. Programs of malaria control were integrated in the general rural development of land reclamation, irrigation construction, and improvement of sanitary conditions for both humans and livestock. While timely treatment of malaria is essential, the anti-malaria campaigns strongly emphasized preventive methods, as "prevention first" was the health policy in the 1950s-1980s.

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