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History of Medicine Introduction This Guide to Collections relating to the History of Artificial Organs is a review of materials located in known repositories as well as private and corporate holdings worldwide. This guide is an introduction, not an inventory, to the papers, records, films, tapes, interviews and artifacts relevant to the history of artificial organ developments. Purpose of the Guide This Guide is intended to serve many purposes. It marks an essential first step towards preserving the documentary history of artificial organ developments in the United States and abroad. It is intended to bring attention to the need to preserve recent medical science history before documents and devices are lost.

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History of Medicine Introduction This guide describes the modern manuscript collections concerning Nursing, Midwifery and Obstetrics found in the History of Medicine Division. These collections include lecture notes on midwifery, records of nursing schools and associations, and the correspondence and personal papers of persons involved in the fields of Nursing and Midwifery. Persons mentioned include Francis Henry Ramsbotham and James Young Simpson. A majority of the collections are dated from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, although there are several collections from the eighteenth century. Subjects are listed alphabetically with an index of terms. Brief descriptions include author of collection, physical description, and call number.

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History of Medicine INTRODUCTION Tropical medicine began in the nineteenth century when doctors diagnosed infectious diseases in soldiers and colonists who had lived in tropical areas. In 1877, English scientist Sir Patrick Manson proved that mosquitoes spread elephantiasis to humans and he later theorized that the same was true with malaria. This was an enormous step in tropical medicine and the understanding of tropical diseases, leading to advances in prevention methods. The field of tropical medicine consists of the study, treatment, and prevention of tropical diseases. Tropical diseases can be defined as those that are mainly of parasitic origin and are common in tropical or subtropical areas.

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History of Medicine Instruction in Surgery. Five physicians and their colleagues in the surgical amphitheatre of the Massachusetts General Hospital watch as the anesthetist administers ether to a patient who is about to have surgery. This illustration appeared in an 1889 issue of Harper's Weekly . The National Library of Medicine was originally established 150 years ago, in 1836, as the Library of the Army Surgeon General's Office. Perhaps the key event in the library's history occurred in 1865, when Dr. John Shaw Billings became director. For the next 30 years he worked tirelessly to expand the library's holdings and open it as a source of biomedical information for all physicians.

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History of Medicine Home > History Home > Lesser Home This is my fourth exhibit over the last 20 years in a series presenting medicine and social healing in our century. When I reviewed my first book, from which the first exhibit was taken (auditing medical school at UCLA, with the Class of '71), and the second, about medical education in its entirety (from the student's first days until a physician's first professional experiences, in the '80's), I realized that another look was timely. I have always focused on the motivations of health care practitioners, as well as their human endeavors. I admire those who study and train to help others at this high level of knowledge and skill, which takes years to achieve and much personal sacrifice.

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History of Medicine Cesarean Section - A Brief History Preface Cesarean section has been part of human culture since ancient times and there are tales in both Western and non-Western cultures of this procedure resulting in live mothers and offspring. According to Greek mythology Apollo removed Asclepius, founder of the famous cult of religious medicine, from his mother's abdomen. Numerous references to cesarean section appear in ancient Hindu, Egyptian, Grecian, Roman, and other European folklore. Ancient Chinese etchings depict the procedure on apparently living women. The Mischnagoth and Talmud prohibited primogeniture when twins were born by cesarean section and waived the purification rituals for women delivered by surgery.

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History of Medicine Introduction This exhibit [and accompanying brochure] highlight the joint observance of the 500th anniversary of the birth of Paracelsus by three American medical libraries -- The Hahnemann University Library, The National Library of Medicine, and The Washington University Medical Library (St. Louis). It has been prepared to accompany the special exhibits which, along with lectures and other programs, are being organized at these libraries. The intent of the various events is to celebrate as well as to explain the contributions of this major Renaissance figure, especially those in medicine, chemistry, and pharmacy.

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History of Medicine In 1816, an Englishwoman still in her teens, Mary Shelley, conceived the story of a scientist obsessed with creating life. Shelley's scientist, Victor Frankenstein, succeeds. But while Frankenstein's creature can think and feel, he is monstrous to the eye. Spurned by all, including Victor Frankenstein himself, the embittered creature turns into a savage killer. In 1818, Shelley's story was published as Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus . This story — both in the original novel and shaped into new forms, such as plays, films, and comics — has captivated people ever since, exposing hidden, sometimes barely conscious fears of science and technology.

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This on-line version of Here Today, Here Tomorrow... presents a variety of printed medical ephemera from the collections of William H. Helfand and the National Library of Medicine. The exhibit was held at the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, May 22 through September 11, 1995.

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Islamic Culture and the Medical Arts Preface On the 30th of November 1094 AD (or to be more precise, the 19th of the month Dhu al-Qa`dah in the year 487 of the Muslim era), a scribe in Baghdad completed a copy of an Arabic treatise by one of the most important medieval physicians and clinicians -- Abu Bakr Muhammad ibn Zakariya' al-Razi, who worked in Baghdad in the previous century and was later known to Europe as Rhazes. This manuscript is the oldest volume in the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the third oldest Arabic manuscript on any medical topic known to be preserved today.

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History of Medicine Early United States Government Interest in Native American Health Although U.S. Army surgeons treated Native American victims of smallpox near the opening of the 19th-century, government concern for Native American health at this time was manifest more in counting the numbers of people who died from this and other diseases, and estimating how many were left, than in providing institutional remedies. Jedidiah Morse's report indicates this interest: Determining where "Indians" were in North America and how many they were. The report is addressed to the Secretary of War. Indian affairs were administered by the War Department until 1849. The U.S.

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Images From the History of the Public Health Service A Photographic Exhibit Table of Contents Disease Control and Prevention About this exhibit The original work is dedicated to the memory of Ronald J. Kostraba (1942-1991) of the OASH Administrative Services Center, whose dedication to design excellence, tireless research and planning produced this exhibit. The online version was prepared by David Harding under the supervision of R. P. C. Rodgers, M.D. It is organized according to the pagination of the original printed document. Minor factual and spelling corrections have been made to the original text.

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About - Doris Ulmann Photographs About the Doris Ulmann Collection Doris Ulmann (1882-1934) was born and educated in New York City. A graduate of the school of the Ethical Culture Society, a socially liberal organization that championed individual worth regardless of ethnic background or economic condition. Ulmann continued her education at the Columbia University Teacher's College, where she met and studied with photographer Clarence H. White. White was a founding member of Alfred Stieglitz's Photo-Secession and a leader in the Pictorialist movement. When her teacher founded the Clarence H.

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ABOUT e-ASIA The e-Asia project is funded by the University of Oregon Library through the generosity of Nissho Iwai.yella By building a collection of digitized e-books and a database of full text web resources, e-Asia strives to contribute to the research and scholarship of East Asia. While the e-Asia project is based largely on resources held at the University of Oregon Library, its purpose is neither to duplicate nor displace printed traditonal materials. Rather, by providing searchable full text, the digitalization efforts of e-Asia represent a new tool aimed at facilitating the information-gathering process.

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& Welcome to the Fine Arts Print Collection website, a collaborative venture of the , and the . The Print Collection is part of the Fine Art Collection, owned by the Department of Art and managed by the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University. Web and software support has been provided by the staff of the Valley Library. Use the Search or Browse features to view items in the collection. Throughout your search, you can get help with search functions by clicking the help link in the top navigation bar. Customize options for search results, My Favorites, Compare and Slideshow views. View, compare, delete and move collection items you have saved to My Favorites within CONTENTdm.

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African Political Ephemera and Realia Project Search Browse The African Political Ephemera and Realia Project is an online collection of ephemeral material - pamphlets, t-shirts, cloths, posters, to name just a few examples - that documents the material culture of politics in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ephemeral political material often does not find its way into institutional collections either because the material is discarded before it draws the attention of collectors, because it is too popular and mass-produced to merit consideration as art, or because it does not fit easily (either physically or intellectually) into the book- and manuscript-based realm of libraries.

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About - Artists' Books at the University of Oregon Libraries Artists' books have been described as the "quintessential 20th century art form" (Drucker, Johanna. The Century of Artists Books. New York: Granary Books, 1994), and indeed, though there were many predecessors to the contemporary artist's book, the form was really born in the late '50s and early '60s. The collection at the Architecture and Allied Arts Library, which is supported and extended by artists' books in Knight Library's Special Collections, spans the history of these works of art in book form from 1957 to books by artists today with special emphasis on artists working in the Pacific Northwest.

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The Collection The 102 photographs in this collection document the activities of Oregon's Bracero workers - their cultivation and harvesting work in the fields and orchards as well as the farm labor camps in which they lived. Most of the photographs were taken by Oregon State College Extension staff members as part of a larger effort to document the various groups that contributed to alleviate the state's severe shortage of farm labor. Extension photographers included John Burtner, Fred Shideler, Robert Fowler, and Harry Whitten.

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About - Building Oregon Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest provides approximately 20,000 images and documentation about the architectural heritage of the Pacific Northwest with special emphasis on Oregon’s historic sites and built environment. A significant number of images come from slides donated to the University of Oregon Libraries, including the collections of architectural historian Marion Dean Ross , preservationist Michael Shellenbarger, and architect C. Gilman Davis. As a result of continuing collaboration with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office , many documents in the collection represent works listed on the National Register of Historic Places .

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About Scholars' Bank Welcome to Scholars' Bank , an open-access digital repository created to capture, distribute and preserve the intellectual output of the University of Oregon. Scholars' Bank is maintained by the University of Oregon Libraries, under the coordination of Digital Library Services . Using the open-source software DSpace, available from MIT and Hewlett Packard, Scholars' Bank provides stable, long-term storage needed to house the digital products of UO faculty and researchers. If you are interested in starting a community or contributing to an existing community contact a Scholars' Bank representative at scholars@uoregon.edu .

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The three sections of It's in the Blood! A Documentary History of Linus Pauling, Hemoglobin and Sickle Cell Anemia work together to provide an unusually rich source of information on Pauling's work in blood biochemistry and molecular disease. Navigate between the sections by using either the links on the site's home page or the links at the top of any page within the site. Narrative - The first section tells the story of Linus Pauling's research into the nature of human blood.

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Linus Pauling and The Nature of the Chemical Bond: A Documentary History is comprised of three large sub-sections, each of which tells the story of the elucidation of chemical bond theory in a different way. Navigation between sub-sections may be achieved either through use of the links provided on the site homepage or through use of the links located in the header of each page within the site. Narrative - The first section - a forty-nine "chapter" Narrative - recounts the early years of chemical bond investigation primarily focusing on chemist Linus Pauling’s (1901-1994) research, which he later proclaimed as being his most important contribution to science.

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The Gerald W. Williams Collection In 2007 the OSU Libraries acquired the Gerald W. Williams Collection , consisting of the collected historic photographs, personal papers, and research library of Gerald "Jerry" Williams, former national historian for the U.S. Forest Service. Williams, a native Oregonian, spent much of his Forest Service career in the Pacific Northwest, prior to being appointed national historian in 1998. This digital collection includes some of the best imagery from the Williams Collection, including photos of the WWI era Spruce Production Division , logging photos of northwest Oregon taken by John Fletcher Ford , photos of Celilo Falls taken in 1956 by Jack Williams, and photos of depression era Civilian Conservation Corps camps and activities.

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About - Historic Sheet Music The Oregon Music Collection The Oregon Music Collection brings together 55 pieces of music about Oregon or by Oregonians, published between 1880 and 1921. These represent holdings in the Oregon Collection of the University of Oregon’s Special Collections & University Archives and in the Historic Sheet Music Collection in the Music Services Department. Many of the songs and pieces are about or dedicated to specific Oregon events and places, including student songs from the University of Oregon and the Oregon Agricultural College (now Oregon State), the Portland Rose Festival, the Pendleton Round Up, the 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exhibition, Oregon regiments in the Spanish-American War, and the Willamette and Columbia rivers.

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About Historic Oregon Newspapers Welcome to Historic Oregon Newspapers. On this site you can search and access complete content for historic Oregon newspapers that have been digitized as part of the Oregon Digital Newspaper Program (ODNP) . Soon you will also be able to read historic essays about each of the featured newspapers and view sample lesson plans to help K-12 Educators integrate historic newspapers into their classroom strategies. We hope to keep adding new titles and more pages, so please check back periodically for content updates. The ODNP was also created to help facilitate the digitization of Oregon newspapers by outside organizations/individuals and include in this open state-wide resource for Historic Oregon Newspapers online.

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About - Historical Photographs Working in concert with Metadata Services and Digital Projects , staff in Special Collections & University Archives selected several representative photographic collections for digitization and online display. Selection criteria were based on several factors, including the historic content of the photographs, the pure visual appeal of individual images, and finally, research requests from the past. The larger goal of the University of Oregon Photograph Collection is to make the public aware of the quality and depth of the photograph collections owned by Special Collections & University Archives and to encourage further research on the original photographic materials.

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About - University of Oregon. Office of the Dean of Personnel Administration. National Japanese American Student Relocation Council Records 1942-1946 The National Japanese American Student Relocation Council was created by university administrators as a means of relocating Japanese American college students to other universities and colleges away from the West coast during World War II, and to prevent these students from being interned in government-run internment camps. At the University of Oregon, Karl Onthank, Dean of Personnel Administration, represented the University in relocating UO Japanese American students. The collection includes correspondence, newsletters, speeches, minutes of meetings, and ephemera.

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Leslie Jones worked for the Boston Herald-Traveler newspaper between the years 1917 and 1956. He was educated at the Farm and Trade School on Thompson Island. Jones first worked as a pattern-maker, but had long held an interest in photography. While working in a Boston factory, he continued developing himself as a freelance photographer. It was not until Jones unfortunately lost two of his fingers to the factory machinery, however, which led him to convert this avocation into his profession. He joined the Boston Herald-Traveler staff in 1917.

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About - Lesbian Intentional Communities: Ruth Mountaingrove Photographs The Ruth Mountaingrove Papers include textual and graphical materials. The collection is currently arranged into four series, beginning with correspondence, diaries, ephemera and finally, photographs. The photograph series (Series IV) is currently the only series within this collection that is processed and available for research use. Ruth's photographs depict her life on lesbian land, and as a member of the national feminist/lesbian network.

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