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What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

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Elvis Presley met President Richard Nixon in the Oval Office on December 21, 1970. This is the behind-the-scenes story of how and why the meeting occured told through the original photographs, letters and memos created by Presley and the White House staff.

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This web site features approximately 320 digitally rendered images from a collection of over 15,000 photographic prints held by the University Archives of Washington University in St. Louis. This web site consists of five sections, namely: that will be on exhibit in the Department of Special Collections in Olin Library at Washington University in St. Louis from 25 May to 31 July 2001. Last modified: August 3, 2001

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Introduction by Anne Posega With these words Hanmer voiced England's growing national pride in Shakespeare, a pride materially represented by the numerous editions which were produced in the 18th century. Different editors argued for their textual emendations in prefaces, footnotes, and advertisements, and the debate fueled layer after layer of criticism and responses. In a similar way, the illustrations in these editions were themselves transforming, starting with the first illustrated edition in 1709. Edited by Nicolas Rowe and printed for Jacob Tonson, The Works of Mr. William Shakespear, in Six Volumes was the first edition to be "Adorn'd with cuts". The illustrations in this edition were generally theatrical in nature, with many looking like illustrations of a production.

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Celebrating Women The achievements of women have marked every aspect of Washington University history, in its excellence of teaching, in the depth of its research, and in the lives of so many students. We hope you will enjoy browsing the thematic topics of this online exhibit, which are listed on the right-hand menu. Each section contains multiple pages of information. The exhibit may also be searched by keyword, or you can select "Browse Items" or "Browse Collections" to view lists of materials used in this exhibition. The stories of these accomplishments could fill pages upon pages. This exhibit can only offer a beginning look into this history by highlighting some of these women and their accomplishments.

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Overture At many universities, athletics was said to unite the student body, but at Washington before the First World War, dramatics came closest to filling that role ... With no more than occasional help from faculty members, usually in the English Department, and a few theater buffs in the city, students made Washington University the busiest center of theatrical activity in St. Louis --Ralph Morrow, Washington University in St. Louis: A History , p.242. In Curtain Time , the story of student performing arts at the University is told through programs, music scores, photographs, sound recordings, video, and artifacts from the University's historical record.

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Depicting Devotion: Illuminated Books of Hours from the Middle Ages December 5, 2001 - February 16, 2002 Curated by Kevin Kalish, Department of English and Christina Linsenmeyer van Schalkwyk, Department of Music Rarely does the opportunity come to peruse, page by page, through a medieval book or manuscript. This exhibit attempts just that. By following the arrangement of this exhibition, the viewer sees the structure and format of a Book of Hours writ large. Books of Hours, one specimen in the history of Illuminated Manuscripts, exhibit a vivid interplay between image and text.

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Terra Incognita: An Online Exhibition This exhibit features early printed accounts of exploration and cultural encounters between what is known as the Old World or Europe and the New World or the Americas. The people on both sides of these encounters viewed the people they met through the screen of their culture and how they perceived the world, including their myths, legends, and religious beliefs. Both sides often had to reconfigure and rebuild their idea of the world with this new knowledge. The results yielded much knowledge and discovery but also misunderstanding, fear and violent attempts to control various groups.

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About Wayman Crow The youngest in a family of twelve children, Wayman Crow was born in Hartford, Kentucky, on March 7, 1808. Crow first entered the dry goods business in 1820, when he began a five-year apprenticeship in a general dry goods store in Kentucky. By 1828, he was operating his own dry goods store, and he moved to St. Louis in 1835. In partnership with his cousin, Joshua Tevis of Philadelphia, he established the wholesale dry goods house of Crow & Tevis. In later years, the business would be known as Crow, McCreery & Company Crow, Hargadine & Company, and Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company. In 1840, Crow was elected to the Missouri state senate, on the Whig ticket. He was elected to a second term in the senate in 1850.

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This website, dedicated to the work by women artists in the collections of Washington University, was developed in 2001-2002 with the support of a grant from the Sam Fox Arts Center at Washington University in Saint Louis. The project was developed in concert with a course, "L01-3631 Creative Women: Modern Artists and Writers," co-taught in the Spring of 2002 by Elizabeth C. Childs, Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology, and Helen Power, Senior Lecturer in Women's Studies. Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, supervised the design and implementation of the site in consultation with Professor Childs and Dr. Sabine Eckmann, Curator of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.

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This collection is part of the Glasgow Digital Library and is maintained by the Centre for Digital Library Research at the University of Strathclyde . The resource was developed as part of the Resources for Learning project funded by the New Opportunities Fund digitisation programme. Further resources and 70,000 objects can be found on the RLS site .

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Voyage of the Scotia 1902-04 The material for Voyage of the Scotia 1902-04 was supplied by the Royal Scottish Geographical Society unless stated otherwise, and was edited and converted to web format at the Centre for Digital Library Research . This resource was developed as part of the Resources for Learning project funded by the New Opportunities Fund digitisation programme. Further resources and 70,000 objects can be found on the RLS site .

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The Mitchell Library is one of the largest public reference libraries in Europe. To make its resources more accessible, a selection of photographs and other images of the city has been digitised. This project has been partly funded by the Scottish Office Challenge Fund. These images are just a small selection from those held in Archives and Special Collections in the Mitchell Library (on Level 2) and also from the city's museums. Private owners of images have also kindly lent them for copying. The selected material is of local and historical interest, featuring Glasgow's buildings and streets as well as showing Glasgow's people going about their daily lives.

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The Red Clydeside period During the period between 1910 and 1932 the city of Glasgow was witness to an unparalleled wave of working class protest and political agitation which challenged the forces of capitalism and also, on occasion, directly challenged the state itself. The events and people who shaped this period forged an enduring legacy which still remains part of the political and social fabric of the city to the present day, and which is known quite simply as Red Clydeside. This turbulent period of industrial, social and political upheaval reinforced Glasgow's reputation as the centre of working class struggle in Britain in the early years of the twentieth century.

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August 2003 James Maxton was one of the leading figures of the Independent Labour Party (ILP) in Glasgow and a key political figure during the Red Clydeside period. Like many of his colleagues in the ILP, Maxton was a pacifist and campaigned against Britain's involvement in the first world war and against the introduction of conscription. Maxton was imprisoned in 1916 for delivering pro-strike speeches at a demonstration to oppose the Munitions Act. Maxton was elected MP for Bridgeton in 1922 and devoted much of his political life to alleviating poverty within the city of Glasgow. Maxton attempted on several occasions to steer the Parliamentary Labour Party in the direction of a strictly socialist programme of policies.

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Last Updated: 19/03/2004 Disclaimer: This website is best viewed with a monitor resolution of at least 1024x768. eMail: victoriantimes@cdlr.strath.ac.uk Victorian Times is funded by the New Opportunities Fund (NOF) under their digitisation funding strand. � Centre for Digital Library Research, University of Strathclyde, 2003-2009

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March 2002 The Aspect project was set up to create a digital archive of the ephemera - leaflets, flyers, postcards, newsletters - produced by candidates and political parties for the first Scottish parliamentary election in May 1999. The project is funded by the University of Strathclyde's Directorate of Information Strategy The archive is based on the collection of election ephemera held by the Andersonian Library at the University of Strathclyde, which is acknowledged to be an important and unique record of a key event in Scottish history. The creation of a digital archive will significantly improve the accessibility and usability of the information contained within the collection whilst conserving the original materials, which may be subject to deterioration through loss and damage.

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Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Search: About Click on the stripes below to read more Prototypography (the use of both woodblock and movable type) The images of these items are presented in context, showing, for instance, a handwritten interleaved German translation of the Apocalypse (BB-2) and the incorporation of snippets of woodcut printing into the marginal decoration of a manuscript book (XYL-28). Evidence of paper watermarks gathered by scholars has been included in the form of images made by beta-radiography.

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Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Search: Early Printing in Europe: examples and evidence in Bodleian collections The Bodleian’s collections of early printed books contain over 6000 incunables (books printed before 1500). The stories these collections tell cross many centuries and continents. Technological and business innovation in 15th-century Germany launched a printing trade that supplanted manuscript copies of many scholarly and religious works, and made possible new forms of text and illustrative practices.

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Home Greek Collection Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Greek Manuscripts at Oxford Browse the collection online.

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Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Search: Masterpieces of the non-Western book The Bodleian has had unusual opportunities to acquire, through the activities of collectors in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, a wide range of pictorial material produced in and relating to Asia, the Near East, and South Asia. The Hebrew, Islamic, and South Asian collections are particularly rich in fine illustrated and illuminated manuscripts. Islamic Collections The Bodleian’s Islamic collections include many fine examples of Arabic and Persian manuscript ornamentation.

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Home Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts (from 35mm) Browse the collection Around 25,000 images selected mostly from Western illuminated manuscripts (with a few from early printed books) and scanned from the Bodleian's older image library of 35mm slides and

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This exhibition of the ephemera of trade in the British Isles from 1654 to the 1860s draws primarily on the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera in the Bodleian Library. Trade cards and bill headings, in spite their small format, contain a wealth of information both in their textual and iconographic content.

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Arthur Evans Archive (Knossos excavations) The Arthur Evans archive consists of the archaeological records and papers of Sir Arthur Evans (Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, 1884-1908), which he bequeathed to the Museum on his death in 1941. A large part of these relate to his excavations at the Bronze Age site of Knossos on Crete, carried out between 1900 and 1931. Of particular importance are the series of architectural plans and elevations and archaeological sections, which relate both to the architecture of the site as it was uncovered and to the reconstructions carried out in situ by Evans and his architects. These reveal information not disclosed in the selectively published plans and/or obscured by the restorations.

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About About the Collection The John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera offers a fresh view of British history through primary, uninterpreted printed documents which, produced for short-term use, have survived by chance. The Collection is strongest in the 18th to early 20th centuries but also contains earlier documents. Physically arranged in some 700 subject headings, it is searchable in myriad ways through detailed cataloguing, selective OCR and digitisation. The John Johnson Collection is one of the Special Collections of the Bodleian Library and it is part of the department of Rare Books and Printed Ephemera .

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The Bodleian Library has unparalleled holdings of over 30,000 ballads in several major collections. Broadside ballads are important source material for:

popular literary history
music history
social history
art history
printing history

The Broadside Ballads project, undertaken with funding from the NFF Specialised Research Collections initiative, aims to make the ballads and ballad sheets available to the research community.

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Marking 100 years since H.H. Asquith became Prime Minister 100 years ago H.H. Asquith (1852-1928) became Prime Minister. In continuous office for over eight years from 1908 to 1916, he was at the helm of a government which re-modelled the British political landscape and introduced innovatory social measures. The introduction of old age pensions, national insurance, and employment exchanges, and the reform of the House of Lords, are among the developments chronicled in Asquith's papers and those of his political colleagues held at the Bodleian . Long standing issues such as Irish home rule and women's suffrage also had to be addressed.

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Writing Blanks, Board Games and other Educational Games of the 18th and 19th centuries from the John Johnson and Harding Collections Since the acquisition of the Opie Collection, the Bodleian has become a centre for studies in juvenilia; this has led to increased interest in the games in the John Johnson Collection, with concomitant preservation and handling problems. Many of these games are housed in drawers, others in large folders. Because of their size they are vulnerable. They are also rare. The aim of the project was to digitise a large proportion of this material, and to make it available to the international research community both through the John Johnson Collection online catalogue and through the ODL website.

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About Us Parliament Week (31 October - 6 November 2011) Crossing Borders: Hebrew Manuscripts as a Meeting-place of Cultures The Bodleian Library�s winter exhibition tells the story of how together Jews, Christians and Muslims have contributed to the development of the book. Crossing Borders: Hebrew Manuscripts as a Meeting-place of Cultures draws on the Bodleian�s Hebrew holdings, one of the largest and most important collections of Hebrew manuscripts in the world. Covering a time span of 300 years between the thirteenth century and fifteenth century, the exhibition brings to light different aspects of Jewish life in a non-Jewish medieval society.

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Posters from the Conservative Party Archive representing election publicity throughout the 20th century up to recent times. Conservative Party Archive: Poster Collection
All images are copyright the Bodleian Library and are free for private use and teaching provided you acknowledge the source. A full copyright statement and a permissions form for all other uses, including publication, are available here. Higher resolution images are available via the Bodleian Library Imaging Services.

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