▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to initiate a search.

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

Organization

Person

City

Country

Province Or State

Text

This exhibit highlights the contributions of the thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during World War II. Documents from the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis form the core of the exhibit. For those who lived through the Second World War, this exhibit may help them recall their experiences. For those who did not, it is hoped they will gain a deeper understanding of the sacrifice and commitment of those Americans who, after almost four years, were "A People at War."

0
♥ 0
324 reads

Guns, tanks, and bombs were the principal weapons of World War II, but there were other, more subtle forms of warfare as well. Words, posters, and films waged a constant battle for the hearts and minds of the American citizenry just as surely as military weapons engaged the enemy. Persuading the American public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. The Government launched an aggressive propaganda campaign with clearly articulated goals and strategies to galvanize public support, and it recruited some of the nation's foremost intellectuals, artists, and filmmakers to wage the war on that front.

0
♥ 2
343 reads

The President's Daily Diary: November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969 The secretaries outside the Oval Office prepared President Johnson's Daily Diary. Juanita Roberts, the President's personal secretary, assigned the responsibility of preparing the Diary to secretaries in the office. A particular person would "work" the Diary for a scheduled period. As visits and telephone calls occurred, the secretary "working" the Diary would note them; occasionally the secretary missed noting a call or meeting. White House staff who worked closely with the President frequently entered the Oval Office without the visit being noted in the Diary.

0
♥ 0
287 reads

    About This Exhibit Tokens and Treasures Gifts to Twelve Presidents   The exhibition "Tokens and Treasures, Gifts to Twelve Presidents" was displayed in the Circular Gallery of the National Archives, March 22, 1996 through February 2, 1997. This exhibit showcases over 200 gifts sent to Presidents Hoover through Clinton.

0
♥ 0
234 reads

Treasures of Congress An exhibit in the National Archives Rotunda, Washington, DC January 21, 2000—February 19, 2001 Few institutions have been as central to the course of American history as the U.S. Congress. Most of the great issues in our national life have been played out there, and many of our most memorable political figures have served in the House of Representatives or the Senate. Congress's pivotal position was built into the American system in 1787.

0
♥ 0
307 reads

Chrysler Cars Information Although both cars have been in the Truman Library collection for years, they had lost much of their original historical integrity, having passed through a series of other owners once the Trumans moved into the White House in 1945. For the past two years, a team of restorers has worked meticulously documenting the existing condition of the cars and establishing a restoration plan. Detailed production records from the Chrysler archives were consulted to determine paint colors and options which were originally included on the cars.

0
♥ 0
278 reads

When Judge John Sirica gaveled the trial of the Watergate seven to order on January 8, 1973, federal investigators had already discovered a covert slush fund used to underwrite nefarious activities against Democrats. The money and the men on trial could be linked to the Committee to Re-elect the President (CRP) at whose head sat the former Attorney General of the United States, and President Nixon’s former law partner, John Mitchell. At the trial, E. Howard Hunt, who had planned the break-in, and four of the burglars pleaded guilty. G. Gordon Liddy, who helped in the planning, and James McCord, the other burglar, refused to cooperate, were convicted of various charges, and sentenced to prison.

0
♥ 0
384 reads

What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

0
♥ 0
376 reads

Elvis Presley met President Richard Nixon in the Oval Office on December 21, 1970. This is the behind-the-scenes story of how and why the meeting occured told through the original photographs, letters and memos created by Presley and the White House staff.

0
♥ 0
301 reads

Introduction by Anne Posega With these words Hanmer voiced England's growing national pride in Shakespeare, a pride materially represented by the numerous editions which were produced in the 18th century. Different editors argued for their textual emendations in prefaces, footnotes, and advertisements, and the debate fueled layer after layer of criticism and responses. In a similar way, the illustrations in these editions were themselves transforming, starting with the first illustrated edition in 1709. Edited by Nicolas Rowe and printed for Jacob Tonson, The Works of Mr. William Shakespear, in Six Volumes was the first edition to be "Adorn'd with cuts". The illustrations in this edition were generally theatrical in nature, with many looking like illustrations of a production.

0
♥ 0
249 reads

Celebrating Women The achievements of women have marked every aspect of Washington University history, in its excellence of teaching, in the depth of its research, and in the lives of so many students. We hope you will enjoy browsing the thematic topics of this online exhibit, which are listed on the right-hand menu. Each section contains multiple pages of information. The exhibit may also be searched by keyword, or you can select "Browse Items" or "Browse Collections" to view lists of materials used in this exhibition. The stories of these accomplishments could fill pages upon pages. This exhibit can only offer a beginning look into this history by highlighting some of these women and their accomplishments.

0
♥ 0
296 reads

Overture At many universities, athletics was said to unite the student body, but at Washington before the First World War, dramatics came closest to filling that role ... With no more than occasional help from faculty members, usually in the English Department, and a few theater buffs in the city, students made Washington University the busiest center of theatrical activity in St. Louis --Ralph Morrow, Washington University in St. Louis: A History , p.242. In Curtain Time , the story of student performing arts at the University is told through programs, music scores, photographs, sound recordings, video, and artifacts from the University's historical record.

0
♥ 0
237 reads

Depicting Devotion: Illuminated Books of Hours from the Middle Ages December 5, 2001 - February 16, 2002 Curated by Kevin Kalish, Department of English and Christina Linsenmeyer van Schalkwyk, Department of Music Rarely does the opportunity come to peruse, page by page, through a medieval book or manuscript. This exhibit attempts just that. By following the arrangement of this exhibition, the viewer sees the structure and format of a Book of Hours writ large. Books of Hours, one specimen in the history of Illuminated Manuscripts, exhibit a vivid interplay between image and text.

0
♥ 0
368 reads

In keeping with its designer's intent, Washington University's Benjamin Brown Graham Memorial Chapel serves as a refuge to entertain both the intellectual and spiritual. The physical design of Graham is quite straightforward. The intellectual and spiritual impetus of the design of Graham is not. By sauntering through a forest of historical perspective, we will examine Graham's manner of conception by focusing on two elements: grotesques and glass.

0
♥ 0
232 reads

Collection Description 35,000 Items (164.5 linear feet) Access: Some restrictions. Contact curator. James Ingram Merrill was born in New York City on March 3, 1926, and grew up in Manhattan and Southampton. He was the son of Charles Merrill, co-founder of the brokerage firm Merrill Lynch, and his second wife, Hellen Ingram. He began writing poems at as a child, and at age sixteen, while he was in prep school, his father had a book of them privately printed under the title Jim’s Book . Merrill’s studies at Amherst College were interrupted by service in the U.S. Army from 1944 to 1945. Another book, The Black Swan , was privately printed in 1946 while he was still in college. Following his graduation in 1947, he taught for a year at Bard College.

0
♥ 0
273 reads

Site Search Hours | Site Index email    chat    phone    text My Library Accounts | Interlibrary Loan | Reserves A Description of the Arnold Semeiology Collection Perhaps the most varied and individual collection in the Special Collections of the Washington University Libraries, the Philip Mills Arnold Semeiology Collection now numbers approximately 1600 volumes, extending in time from the Ars Oratoria of Jacopo Publicio (Augsburg, 1490) to Charles Kasiel Bliss's International Semantography (Sydney, 1948-49), and ranging in subject matter from cryptography to the sign language of the deaf.

0
♥ 0
267 reads

The Printing House of the Family Blaeu: 17th Century Cartographic Printing from the Netherlands During the seventeenth century the people of the seventeen united provinces of the Netherlands experienced a period of tremendous economic prosperity. As a water-logged society with few land-based natural resources of their own, the Dutch developed into a highly efficient maritime culture that feverishly explored the globe to find goods that were in demand on the continental European market. Along with numerous advances in the fields of science, industry, business, and linguistics, the Dutch also became experts at book and cartographic printing.

0
♥ 0
263 reads

Terra Incognita: An Online Exhibition This exhibit features early printed accounts of exploration and cultural encounters between what is known as the Old World or Europe and the New World or the Americas. The people on both sides of these encounters viewed the people they met through the screen of their culture and how they perceived the world, including their myths, legends, and religious beliefs. Both sides often had to reconfigure and rebuild their idea of the world with this new knowledge. The results yielded much knowledge and discovery but also misunderstanding, fear and violent attempts to control various groups.

0
♥ 0
274 reads

About Wayman Crow The youngest in a family of twelve children, Wayman Crow was born in Hartford, Kentucky, on March 7, 1808. Crow first entered the dry goods business in 1820, when he began a five-year apprenticeship in a general dry goods store in Kentucky. By 1828, he was operating his own dry goods store, and he moved to St. Louis in 1835. In partnership with his cousin, Joshua Tevis of Philadelphia, he established the wholesale dry goods house of Crow & Tevis. In later years, the business would be known as Crow, McCreery & Company Crow, Hargadine & Company, and Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company. In 1840, Crow was elected to the Missouri state senate, on the Whig ticket. He was elected to a second term in the senate in 1850.

0
♥ 0
371 reads

Alan Dawson February 2007 The Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC) was formed in March 1889, with the aim to: "encourage mountaineering in Scotland in winter as well as summer; to serve as a bond of union amongst all lovers of mountain climbing; to create facilities for exploring the less known parts of the country; to collect various kinds of information, especially as regards routes, distances, means of access, time occupied in ascents, character of rocks, extent of snow in winter, etc., and in general to promote everything that will conduce to the convenience of those who take a pleasure in mountains and mountain scenery." The printed journal Soon after its formation, the Club began publishing the Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal, following the successful model of the Alpine Journa

0
♥ 0
573 reads

The Red Clydeside period During the period between 1910 and 1932 the city of Glasgow was witness to an unparalleled wave of working class protest and political agitation which challenged the forces of capitalism and also, on occasion, directly challenged the state itself. The events and people who shaped this period forged an enduring legacy which still remains part of the political and social fabric of the city to the present day, and which is known quite simply as Red Clydeside. This turbulent period of industrial, social and political upheaval reinforced Glasgow's reputation as the centre of working class struggle in Britain in the early years of the twentieth century.

0
♥ 0
315 reads

These books have been digitised and converted to web format at the Centre for Digital Library Research . Research is continuing into ebook development and indexing, partly funded by the University of Strathclyde Research and Development Fund.

0
♥ 0
412 reads

Last Updated: 19/03/2004 Disclaimer: This website is best viewed with a monitor resolution of at least 1024x768. eMail: victoriantimes@cdlr.strath.ac.uk Victorian Times is funded by the New Opportunities Fund (NOF) under their digitisation funding strand. � Centre for Digital Library Research, University of Strathclyde, 2003-2009

0
♥ 0
490 reads

March 2002 The Aspect project was set up to create a digital archive of the ephemera - leaflets, flyers, postcards, newsletters - produced by candidates and political parties for the first Scottish parliamentary election in May 1999. The project is funded by the University of Strathclyde's Directorate of Information Strategy The archive is based on the collection of election ephemera held by the Andersonian Library at the University of Strathclyde, which is acknowledged to be an important and unique record of a key event in Scottish history. The creation of a digital archive will significantly improve the accessibility and usability of the information contained within the collection whilst conserving the original materials, which may be subject to deterioration through loss and damage.

0
♥ 0
231 reads

Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Search: Masterpieces of the non-Western book The Bodleian has had unusual opportunities to acquire, through the activities of collectors in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, a wide range of pictorial material produced in and relating to Asia, the Near East, and South Asia. The Hebrew, Islamic, and South Asian collections are particularly rich in fine illustrated and illuminated manuscripts. Islamic Collections The Bodleian’s Islamic collections include many fine examples of Arabic and Persian manuscript ornamentation.

0
♥ 1
269 reads

Home Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts (from 35mm) Browse the collection Around 25,000 images selected mostly from Western illuminated manuscripts (with a few from early printed books) and scanned from the Bodleian's older image library of 35mm slides and

0
♥ 0
312 reads

This exhibition of the ephemera of trade in the British Isles from 1654 to the 1860s draws primarily on the John Johnson Collection of Printed Ephemera in the Bodleian Library. Trade cards and bill headings, in spite their small format, contain a wealth of information both in their textual and iconographic content.

0
♥ 0
427 reads

Arthur Evans Archive (Knossos excavations) The Arthur Evans archive consists of the archaeological records and papers of Sir Arthur Evans (Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum, 1884-1908), which he bequeathed to the Museum on his death in 1941. A large part of these relate to his excavations at the Bronze Age site of Knossos on Crete, carried out between 1900 and 1931. Of particular importance are the series of architectural plans and elevations and archaeological sections, which relate both to the architecture of the site as it was uncovered and to the reconstructions carried out in situ by Evans and his architects. These reveal information not disclosed in the selectively published plans and/or obscured by the restorations.

0
♥ 4
620 reads

Home View Collection Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Bringing Laxton to life A 17th-century survey and map of Laxton, Nottinghamshire.

0
♥ 0
275 reads

The Bodleian Library has unparalleled holdings of over 30,000 ballads in several major collections. Broadside ballads are important source material for:

popular literary history
music history
social history
art history
printing history

The Broadside Ballads project, undertaken with funding from the NFF Specialised Research Collections initiative, aims to make the ballads and ballad sheets available to the research community.

0
♥ 1
313 reads