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Ralph M. Munroe Family Papers Ralph Middleton "Commodore" Munroe, avid yachtsman, successful businessman, and celebrated patriarch of the Munroe family, made Coconut Grove his home in the late 1800s. Munroe and his family moved to South Florida from Staten Island, New York, to provide a more beneficial environment for his wife, Eva Maelia Hewitt, who suffered from tuberculosis. Unfortunately, both his wife and daughter succumbed to illness and died shortly after their move to Miami. Munroe subsequently split his time between Staten Island and the Grove, often staying at the Peacock family hotel, The Bay View House, later known as the Peacock Inn.

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Alan Crockwell Collection Alan Crockwell, a science teacher at The Carrolton School of the Sacred Heart in Coconut Grove, moved from Buffalo to Miami in 1977. Crockwell co-founded the Miami Memorabilia Collectors Club in 1991. He has published numerous articles on Miami history and its collectibles. The Alan Crockwell Collection contains a variety of materials from different sources that document the history of Miami, Coconut Grove, Coral Gables, and greater Miami-Dade County. Much of the content is related to Ralph Middleton Munroe and his family.

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Composer, arranger, and pianist Aldemaro Romero was an innovator of Venezuelan music, contributing to its increased visibility on the international scene. His musical career started at the age of 10, singing and playing the guitar on the radio program, La Hora Infantil. In 1941, Romero moved to Caracas and started working as a piano accompanist and composer with one of the most famous tropical bands in Venezuela, Alfonso Larrain's orchestra. In 1948, Romero traveled to New York to work as arranger and piano accompanist for the record label RCA Victor. In 1952, he began the famous sequel of recordings titled Dinner in… (Caracas, Rio, Buenos Aires, Columbia and Mexico).

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890-1998) led an extraordinary, long life, and established herself as one of South Florida's premier personalities of the twentieth century. Douglas' importance as a female writer and reporter of both local and national significance is further impacted by her pioneering role as an environmental and political activist. As a writer and reporter she enjoyed a distinguished career first as an assistant editor for the Miami Herald and later as an O. Henry Award winning short story writer and novelist.

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  The Bob Simms Collection documents the life and activities of Robert H. Simms in the black communities of Coconut Grove and Miami. Born in Snow Hill, Alabama in 1927, Bob moved to Florida in 1953 to join the faculty of the George Washington Carver schools in Coconut Grove. In Miami, he served as Executive Director of the Metro Dade Community Relations Board from 1968 to 1983, developed the Miami Inner-City Minority Experience (MICME) for the U.S. Department of Defense in the 1970s, and led efforts to create and implement the Inner City Marine Project (now known as the Mast Academy).

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The Department of Special Collections at the University of Miami has significant holdings of rare and unusual books in the fields of Miami and Florida history, the Caribbean, and Latin and South America. These books cover topics of literature, geography, religion (and in particular missionary history), art, politics, and economics. This collection includes examples of early printing, private press publications, and fine printing. They are supplemented by a rich collection of historical maps, photographs, and archival documents. The personal library of Jackie Gleason focuses on the donor's lifelong interest in parapsychology and his career in television and film.

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Florida Promotional Materials Attracting people to Florida has always been an integral part of the state's developmental goals. The Florida Promotional Materials collection consists of a variety of promotional materials designed to draw tourists and settlers to the state. Included are numerous brochures, maps, and clippings that highlight historical sites such as the Barnacle Museum. Also featured are hotels, important for their historical and practical value, and recreational opportunities.

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Walter Tennyson Swingle Walter Tennyson Swingle (1871 - 1952) was a renowned botantist and one of the twentieth century's foremost authorities on citrus plants. In 1943, after 50 years of service to the United States Department of Agriculture, he was given a position on the faculty of the University of Miami by President Bowman F. Ashe who was impressed with Swingle?s vision of tropical botany. Swingle was given the title Consultant of Tropical Botany and set up the Plant Research Laboratory in the old Botany building in Coral Gables. At UM, Swingle completed his monograph "The Botany of Citrus and its Relatives of the Orange Subfamily" which remains the premier reference for the taxonomy, morphology, and anatomy of these plants.

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Gregory Bush Community Studies Oral Histories Professor Gregory Bush (History Department) and the Institute for Public History (IPH) have recorded a series of interviews around the issue of public spaces in South Florida. Participants, who are representative of the diverse cultural milieu of the region, reflect and provide insights on migration, gentrification, the history of individual neighborhoods, housing, and community services. These voices help to articulate the ongoing discourse on public space as it applies to South Florida?s History of development. The recordings and accompanying transcripts of the oral history collection document the unique experiences of the region?s inhabitants.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Oral History Center at the University of Louisville has long sought to aid in the documentation of the history of Louisville's African American community. This effort was bolstered in the 1970s by funding from the Kentucky Oral History Commission, which supported a number of the interviews included in this first online offering. The African American Oral History Collection includes interviews conducted as part of projects designed to document particular aspects of Louisville's history and/or important local institutions, such as the Red Cross (Community) Hospital and the Louisville Municipal College, as well as projects that sought to document African American life more generally. Most of the interviews were conducted in the late 1970s.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS Biography Orlando Metcalfe Poe was born on the family farm in Navarre, Ohio on March 7, 1832. He attended several public schools and two years in Canton Academy in Canton, Ohio before ultimately attaining his dream – attending the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. Poe excelled particularly in mathematics and graduated sixth in his class of 1856. After graduation, Poe sought to put his engineering skills to work for the military. He moved to Detroit to join the Topographical Engineers. Wartime duties for topographical engineers included surveying positions of the army and its enemy, sketching routes of the enemy and preparing maps of battlefields. In peacetime, they surveyed and charted the nation’s rivers and lakes.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Kornhauser Health Sciences Library History Collections house a valuable body of historical manuscripts documenting the evolution of medical training and health care practices in Kentucky during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including the history of medical and health sciences schools in Louisville and the surrounding region. It is made up of several collections held by the library. Materials include class photographs and related images associated with the Louisville General Hospital School of Nursing, University of Louisville School of Dentistry, and University of Louisville School of Medicine, as well as early medical school catalogs listing students for each session.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Law Library The Law Library is a major regional resource for legal information, serving the university community, the practicing bar, and the general public. Its primary mission is to support the curriculum and the research needs of the faculty and the students of the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. However, as part of an historic and distinguished law school whose roots reach deeply into Kentucky legal history, the Law Library has over the years accumulated rich collections of materials of national and state legal publications, many of which date back to the foundation of the American republic. In addition, through the efforts of Louisville native Louis D.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection Since 2002 the University Libraries have been building a collection of color digital copies of theses and dissertations authored here at the University of Louisville. This effort is in keeping with an international trend of institutions migrating to electronic theses and dissertations (known as ETDs) in order to provide free worldwide access to these titles and to enable graduate students to include digital media in their works. Both the University of Louisville's Graduate School and J.B. Speed School of Engineering incorporated the utilization of digital technologies into their thesis and dissertation guidelines. In July 2006 the Speed School's guidelines were amended so that only an electronic copy will be submitted to the Ekstrom Library.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection University of Louisville students produced their first yearbook, The Colonel , in 1909. The Colonel apparently ceased publication after the 1912 edition, leaving a gap in the documentation of student life until 1922, when its successor, The Kentucky Cardinal , began monthly publication during the school year, with the June edition serving as a de facto yearbook. By 1924, the school year-end annual edition of The Kentucky Cardinal had been renamed The Thoroughbred , a title which lasted until 1972, despite a somewhat sporadic publishing record (no issues were produced in 1932, 1934-1938, 1943, 1945-1946, and 1970-1971).

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Toronto Orphanages and Day Nurseries Introduction In the early half of the nineteenth century, it was common practice for orphaned or deserted children to be bound into apprenticeships. By mid-century, adoption and institutional care began to emerge as alternatives to apprenticeship. Orphanages or children's "homes" and day nurseries provided residential care for children in need. By the 1920s, institutional care was gradually phased out and replaced by programmes of foster care, or "boarding out". Day nurseries evolved as the pre-cursor to daycare centres. Reports and Papers from Toronto's early child care agencies reflect society's evolving attitudes towards childcare and the work ethic from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s.

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About the Collection If you love the performing arts, you'll want to visit the fifth floor of the Toronto Reference Library , home of the Performing Arts Centre . It's a diverse collection of material and services devoted to theatre, music, film, television and dance. This includes the Bill Glassco Collection of original manuscripts from Tarragon's founding director, and early scripts from some of Canada's leading playwrights. To see more of our theatre collection materials online check out these other virtual exhibits: Also, visit the Canadian Theatre Record which contains many items from the Performing Arts Centre. To explore other Toronto Public Library virtual exhibits, click here .

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The Osborne Collection Toronto Public Library’s Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books is one of the world’s foremost historical collections of English-language children’s literature. Located in the Lillian H. Smith branch , the Osborne Collection holds over 80,000 items, including manuscripts, books, book-related art, archives, ephemera and book-related games. Our collection ranges from a 14th-century manuscript of Aesop’s Fables through medieval books of manners, moral tales of the Puritan era, 18th-century chapbooks and hornbooks to Victorian classics of fantasy, adventure, and school stories up to 1910. We also collect modern notable books published after 1910.

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About the collections All images come from the Special Collections Department , Toronto Reference Library, Toronto Public Library. This concludes our virtual exhibition on Fraternal Societies in Canada. Click on the links below to explore some of our recent virtual exhibits:   Or click here to explore all the Toronto Public Library virtual exhibits.  

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Toronto Public Library’s Osborne Collection of Early Children’s Books is one of the world’s foremost historical collections of English-language children’s literature. Located in the Lillian H. Smith branch, the Osborne Collection holds over 80,000 items, including manuscripts, books, book-related art, archives, ephemera and book-related games.
Our holdings

Our collection ranges from a 14th-century manuscript of Aesop’s Fables through medieval books of manners, moral tales of the Puritan era, 18th-century chapbooks and hornbooks to Victorian classics of fantasy, adventure, and school stories up to 1910. We also collect modern notable books published after 1910.

Osborne includes:

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Garden City: Public and Private Gardens in Early Toronto Early Toronto residents, politicians and local entrepreneurs transformed the City by creating public gardens and offering services and supplies to the gardening industry. As a result of their efforts, nineteenth century Toronto emerged as a more liveable community and a popular tourist attraction. By the late 1800s, guidebooks were referring to Toronto as the “Queen City”, the “Holiday City”, and the “ideal summer city”. In the fall and winter, city residents and visitors congregated for social events and recreation in churches, hotel dining rooms and concert halls.

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Sidney Paget: Iconic illustrator of Sherlock Holmes 2010 marks the 150th anniversary of the birth of Sidney Paget (1860-1908), an illustrator closely associated with creating a visual identity for Arthur Conan Doyle’s character Sherlock Holmes. The lean, elegant Holmes Paget presented to readers of the Strand magazine worked beautifully with Conan Doyle???s text, and formed the basis for the image of Holmes that remains popular in the public mind to this day.

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The First Black Doctor in Canada: Anderson Ruffin Abbott   Anderson Ruffin Abbott was the first black Canadian doctor. Abbott and his family had a long history of contributing to the social life and economy of Toronto. Dr. Abbott’s father, Wilson Ruffin Abbott, was born in Richmond, Virginia, to a Scottish-Irish man and a free black woman in 1801. He left home at the age of 15 to work on a Mississippi steamer, and settled in Mobile, Alabama, where he opened a general grocery store. In 1834, the city of Mobile passed a writ requiring all free blacks to provide a bond signed by two white men as a pledge of good behaviour.

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Panorama of the City of Toronto, 1857 Rossin House Hotel In 1857, the roof of the hotel provided the ideal vantage point from which Armstrong, Beere & Hime photographed their Toronto. The Rossin House, on the southeast corner of King and York streets, was the tallest building in the newer commercial district of Toronto when it opened that year. It was one of the city’s pre-eminent hotels, with an 1866 guide claiming: “What the Fifth Avenue Hotel is to New York, and the Windsor is to Montreal, so the celebrated Rossin House is to Toronto.” The Rossin House was destroyed by a fire in 1862, and was rebuilt in 1863.

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Blessed with many ravines, wooded lots and parklands, early Toronto residents were able to enjoy many winter outdoor activies right in their own neighbourhoods. Sleighing, tobogganing, bobsledding, skating, curling, hockey, skiing and snowshoeing were all popular forms of winter recreation. As the city grew and prospered, clubs and associations formed, championships were organized and new facilities were built to meet the demand. Horse drawn sleighs were used to transport goods from farm to city stores in wintertime and wealthy businessmen had them in their stables. Toronto companies would occasionally decide to reward their employees by organizing group horse sleigh rides in High Park. Letter, 29 December 1883 Tobogganing became a popular sport in the late 19th century.

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Royal Visits to Toronto. Toronto has hosted many royal visits. Anniversaries, fundraisers, conferences, athletic competitions and military duty are some of the events and occasions that royalty have celebrated or attended. These visits have included walkabouts and drive-bys that gave the public and media the opportunity to take photographs and catch glimpses of members of the royal family. George VI, visit to Toronto, 22 May 1939, at the King’s Plate, Woodbine (now Greenwood) Race Track, Queen St. E.

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The National Game Long before hockey was played in Canada, the First Peoples of Canada played lacrosse. For them, lacrosse was both a religious ritual and a significant community activity. It prepared young men for war and, in some cases, a game of lacrosse between two tribes could resolve disputes or strengthen alliances. September 6, 1879, page 153 In the 19th century, lacrosse was adopted by the Europeans in Canada. It became an organized sport, where rules were established and clubs formed to embrace the game. Its popularity extended to communities in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Quebec and Ontario.   >> Click on the numbers below to view 6 pages describing the rules of lacrosse.

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Gone Fishin’ Torontonians have a long and happy tradition of heading north to cottage country during the long, hot days of summer. In the 1860s the Muskoka Club was established by a group of Toronto adventurers who led annual expeditions to the Muskoka wilderness. By the 1870s several of the members had purchased land on Lake Joseph, and the tradition of summer cottaging was born. In 1898 a group of professors and alumni from the University of Toronto joined together to purchase recreational property in Go Home Bay, on Georgian Bay, held as shares in the Madawaska Club. Many of the cottagers in Go Home are descendants of those first Madawaska Club members.

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Introduction This virtual exhibit presents a small selection of items taken from the Osborne Collection’s sixtieth anniversary exhibit, When Cinderella Went to the Ball: Five Hundred Years of Fairy Tales , held from September 12 to December 12, 2009. Celebrating one of children’s literature’s most enduringly popular genres, the exhibit progresses from a fifteenth-century Venetian wonder tale ( Historia di Lionbruno , 1476), through “classic” stories and collections by Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm and others, to today’s spin-offs, spoofs and “post-modern” interpretations.

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On July 1st, Canadians from coast to coast will proudly wave the red and white Maple Leaf flag. But how many are aware that the tradition started here, in Toronto? At the time of Confederation in 1867, the maple leaf as a symbol of Canadian patriotism was relatively new. At a public meeting in August, 1860, a group of Toronto citizens, planning for the upcoming Royal Visit of the Prince of Wales, decided to identify themselves as native-born Canadians by wearing a maple leaf. This leather badge was worn at the reception for the Prince of Wales held in Toronto on September 7, 1860. Although the maple leaf had previously been used as a symbol for Canada, this was the first occasion on which it was worn as a national emblem.

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