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History of the Susan H. Douglas Collection The central goal of the project is to preserve, digitize, and catalog all items in the Susan H. Douglas Collection of Political Americana. Acquired from an individual collector between 1957 and 1961, the Douglas collection includes approximately 5,500 items of American political campaign memorabilia and commemorative items dating to between 1789 and 1960.  Mrs. Douglas characterized them as: ballots, bric-a-brac (larger three-dimensional objects), broadsides, buttons, cartoons, maps and charts, pamphlets, paper miscellaneous, parade items, posters, prints, ribbons, sheet music, songbooks, textiles, trinkets, and wearing apparel.

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Database selection The goal of this project is to catalog and digitize each of the 1,780 slides within the Claire Holt collection. Microsoft Excel was selected as the application most suited to cataloguing requirements. Image browser After researching options available for creating and maintaining a widely-accessible virtual collection, Luna Imaging’s In sight® browsing software was selected as the most appropriate way to present the Claire Holt images over the Internet.

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The story of American agriculture is captured in a broad band of documentary resources ranging from the memoirs and transactions of early agriculture societies to newspapers and almanacs; family, community, and corporate archives; and state and county extension service publications. The evolution of farm and rural life and agricultural economy is chronicled in the agriculture periodical press and the numerous local, regional, and national farm journals that exhorted, informed, and shaped the opinions, values, and concerns of early farm families. Journals such as Country Life in America , Cappers' Farmer , and Farm and Family have much to tell historians about the daily activities, issues, and practices of the time.

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About Introduction The Cornell University Library and the Cornell Daily Sun are collaborating on an ambitious new digitization project to provide online access to the Sun's historical files. All of the original newspapers will be scanned and made available on a web site maintained by the Cornell University Library. For more than 120 years, the Sun has provided news, information, and entertainment to the entire Cornell community. Accounts of campus events and activities, sports reporting, and editorial commentary all contribute to make the Sun one of the most important sources of information on the history of the university.

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About The Cornell East Asia Book Series (CEAS), published by the East Asia Program, is well known within the scholarly community for publishing quality books at affordable prices. We have a well-maintained website , and distribute our own books to the academic community and the public at large via mail-order and a secure online bookstore. We have published many books of lasting historical and literary value since the series was founded in 1972, when the publication was called the Cornell University East Asia Papers and the program was called the China-Japan Program. Some of these titles have gone out of print, mostly due to financial limitations. Here we are making available the best of our out-of-print collection. Most books are text-only, some include pictures and maps.

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242 reads

Cornell Modern Indonesia Collection Professor George Kahin's introduction to the first "Interim Report" describes the concerns and intentions of CMIP's editors. Prof. Kahin noted that, "With respect to much of the research carried out in post-revolutionary Indonesia, there has been a lag of two to three or more years between the termination of field work and the first publication describing the results of this work" and " ... the delay has been particularly regrettable inasmuch as the extent of research [on Indonesia] being undertaken is so limited." For this reason, the editors proposed to invite researchers to make their findings available in a provisional form, as CMIP "Interim Reports," or working papers, before the publication of their finished books.

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About GloPAD GloPAD (Global Performing Arts Database) records include authoritative, detailed, multilingual descriptions of digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects related to the performing arts around the world, plus information about related pieces, productions, performers, and creators. GloPAD is in a continual process of development: we have recently merged two related databases, restructured GloPAD to support our newly developed metadata standards, and redesigned the user interface. Approximately 4,500 objects are currently available, with new records added and older records revised on a daily basis.

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A Digital Collection of Cornell's University Archives The Cornell University Digital Archives is a collection of publications from the Cornell University Archives, comprising of a total of 26,481 pages dealing with the history of Cornell University. These materials date from 1868 until 1945 and involve a number of different publications including annual reports, class books and University registers. For a a complete listing of our digital collection click on the browse link.

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about the project introduction The Cornell Historic Math Monograph Collection consists of digital surrogates for materials that were part of a joint study involving Digital Preservation between Cornell University and the Xerox Corporation. Begun in 1990, a process was developed where brittle and decaying books were digitally scanned, using prototype equipment co-developed by Cornell and the Xerox Corporation (the CLASS scanner) and stored as 600dpi, bitonal TIFF images, compressed with ITU Group 4 compression, on digital platters on an EPOCH "jukebox" digital server. Facsimiles of these books were generated and the books were returned to the shelves. The images were available online using specially developed clients in Unix, MAC and PC platforms.

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The Cornell University Witchcraft Collection Part of Cornell University Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell's Witchcraft Collection contains over 3,000 titles documenting the history of the Inquisition and the persecution of witchcraft, primarily in Europe. How to Find Materials The Witchcraft Collection is open to the public. To schedule a research visit or ask a question, please fill out our reference form . Terms of access and research policies are described on the Division’s Registration & Guidelines for Use and Reproductions & Permissions pages. See our Digital Witchcraft Collection to view 104 English language books from Cornell’s Witchcraft Collection.

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Introduction Cornell University has a number of  collections of cuneiform tablets, donated to the university over the past century. These tablets are made of clay and inscribed with signs that modern scholars call cuneiform ("wedge or cone shaped"). They come from an area that is called Mesopotamia, which today roughly equals the territory of modern Iraq. These written documents date from the beginnings of writing, ca. 3350 B.C.E. until the end of the cuneiform tradition, sometime towards the end of the second century C.E. The largest collection of cuneiform tablets at Cornell is housed in the Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen Ancient Near Eastern Studies Seminar in the  Department of Near Eastern Studies (NES) and currently consists of ca.

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About the Ezra Cornell Papers Preface Ezra Cornell referred to himself as a farmer and mechanic who had spent some time working in the telegraph industry. His ambition and imagination, however, were not so prosaic. Skillful work, uncommon tenacity, and fortuitous circumstances resulted in his amassing a fortune. As soon as it became clear that it was a fortune, he promptly rejected conventional practice and sage advice, and directed that those riches be used to found a unique university: a comprehensive and practical institution dedicated to all forms of intellectual endeavor.

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About While most research on the very early period of the reform era focuses on New England or New York City, Friend of Man illustrates that reform was thriving in Central New York as well. In this periodical, one meets a small, but vocal group of people from both races and all walks of life, intent on changing America. Scholars studying social reform in New York State will be interested in Friend of Man 's revelations about the regional interconnectedness of reform, especially in areas such as Utica, Rochester, Buffalo, Albany, and New York City.

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About the Project A first segment of this proposed collection includes documents that pertain to the legacy of Marx and Freud (but also Lenin and Lacan) in Latin America. In particular, the complete collection of the journal Los Libros in Argentina, which played a key role in intellectual life, and still continues to do so today, even though very few people in the world have access to it now. This journal, which was closed by the military Junta in 1976, combined literary and cultural analysis with an increasingly political interrogation of events both in Argentina and abroad.

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About This Collection In 1925, a Cornell professor of apiculture named Everett Franklin Phillips set out to create a major repository of literature on bees and beekeeping. He envisioned this library as an "accessible storehouse of our knowledge of bees and beekeeping." By 1926, Phillips had persuaded over 223 people from twenty-nine states and twenty-six foreign countries to donate thousands of books and pamphlets, and the E.F. Phillips Beekeeping Collection at Cornell was born. Perhaps Phillips' biggest coup was his ingenious plan for raising the money necessary for creating the library's endowment: he convinced hundreds of New York state beekeepers to set aside one of their hives for the library.

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What is Home Economics? The term "home economics" may call up stereotypical images of girls busily sewing and cooking in 1950s classrooms, images that have led many people to view this field as fundamentally narrow, dull, and socially conservative. In the 1960s and 1970s, the women's movement was often critical of home economics, seeing it as a discipline that worked to restrict girls and women to traditional domestic and maternal roles.

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American Indian History and Culture The Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections features significant original materials on the history of native peoples of the Western hemisphere. Thousands of rare books document Indian life-ways, and manuscript materials provide documentation of the work of anthropologists, collectors, and ethnologists. The centerpiece of Cornell's American Indian holdings is the Huntington Free Library Native American Collection , a spectacular gathering of more than 40,000 volumes on the archaeology, ethnology and history of the native peoples of the Americas from the colonial period to the present.

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223 reads

About the Project The Cornell University Library New York State Historical Literature Collection consists of digital surrogates for materials that were part of a joint study involving Digital Preservation between Cornell University and the Xerox Corporation . Begun in 1990, a process was developed where brittle and decaying books were digitally scanned, using prototype equipment co-developed by Cornell and the Xerox Corporation (the CLASS scanner) and stored as 600dpi, bitonal TIFF images, compressed with ITU Group 4 compression, on digital platters on an EPOCH "jukebox" digital server. Facsimiles of these books were generated and the books were returned to the shelves.

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194 reads

Due to Cornell's longstanding ties with Liberia, specifically through Professor Milton Konvitz's 20 years with the Liberian Law Codification Project and Professor Jane Hammond's work organizing the National Law Library , the Cornell Law Library has an extensive collection of Liberian materials, some of which are unique due to the destruction of the National Liberian Library during the civil war. With the end of hostilities in Liberia and as the country begins the process of rebuilding, scholarly interest in Liberia's past, present, and future has increased.

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About the Project Introduction aking of America (MOA) represents a major collaborative endeavor to preserve and make accessible through digital technology a significant body of primary sources related to development of the U.S. infrastructure. Funded originally by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , MOA sought to involve research institutions and national consortia to develop common protocols and consensus for the selection, conversion, storage, retrieval, and use of digitized materials on a large, distributed scale. The initial phase of the project, begun in the fall of 1995, focused on developing a collaborative effort between Cornell University and the University of Michigan .

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About the Project Welcome to Cornell University Library's web site on issues of race, ethnicity and religion. The incentive behind the project was provided by the interest expressed in 2004 by University President Jeffrey S. Lehman, the Provost, the Vice Provost, the Cornell University Librarian and the Cornell University Press in collaborating on a web-based project that would facilitate informed study and discussion of issues related to race, ethnicity and religion on the Cornell campus and in the U.S. In its initial pilot phase (Nov.

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Welcome to the Regmi Research Series Collection Mahesh Chandra Regmi, Nepal's leading historian and archivist, who died in July 2003, was born in Kathmandu in December 1929 to a family of musicians; Regmi opened the Regmi Research Centre in 1959. As the renowned University of California scholar Leo Rose remarked in the mid- 1970s, Regmi's decision to start a private research centre, "was almost inconceivable in Nepal at that time", especially because there were no "assured sources of financial support from either the government of Nepal, a Nepali educational institution, or a foreign foundation". Regmi's initiative, Rose continued, "was indicative not only of a proclivity for entrepreneurship rare in Nepal but also of an independence of mind and a dedication to scholarship". Father Dr.

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About the Project Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD-Rom, DVD-Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

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The Saganet is a cooperative project by The National and University Library of Iceland and Cornell University with the association of the Árni Magnússon Institute to give access via the Internet to digital images of about 240.000 manuscript pages and 153.000 printed pages. The Saganet was opened on July 1, 2001 but work started on July 1, 1997.

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Collection Description See Also: Collection Description Cornell's Anti-Slavery and Civil War Collections The Cornell University Library owns one of the richest collections of anti-slavery and Civil War materials in the world, thanks in large part to Cornell's first President, Andrew Dickson White, who developed an early interest in both fostering, and documenting the abolitionist movement and the Civil War. Even before his arrival at Cornell, White used his lectures at the University of Michigan to respond to the issues of the War by pointing out to his students as many examples as he could of societies that valued the rights of free men over the shallow benefits of slavery. A.D.

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About the Project In 1950, when the Cornell Southeast Asia Program was established, scholarly publishing on the region was undeveloped. Members of the Program recognized that if students were to be trained, they had to have materials to read, and so the Data Papers series was initiated. In this series, one finds materials to interest linguists, anthropologists, archaeologists, political scientists, social scientists, and researchers looking for bibliographic guides to the holdings of Cornell's famous Echols Collection. The various dictionaries included here (the Akha-English Dictionary , Yao-English Dictionary , and the two-volume Dictionary of Cebuano Visayan ) are of great and continuing interest to scholars and speakers of those languages.

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Historical Context The Visions collection includes the written and photographed experiences of Europeans and Americans who traveled to Southeast Asia during the period of imperialism. The peoples of Southeast Asia experienced waves of colonization beginning in 1511 when the Portuguese took Melaka, a strategic and thriving port city on the Malay Peninsula. The Spanish established a colony in the Philippines which they ruled from the 1560s until 1899 when the United States ousted the Spanish and governed the colony until Philippine independence in 1946. The Dutch gradually conquered the areas known today as Indonesia beginning in 1596 and ending after WWII.

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About the Stevens Family Papers This is a collection of correspondence and other papers relating to Robert S. Stevens' work as manager of the Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railway and the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad, and to his investments in Kansas lands. This collection is dated from 1805 - 1899. For more information, go to the Guide to the Stevens Family Papers . For additional information about Cornell University Library's Archival Guides, go to the Guides for Archival and Manuscript Collections . For reference questions, please complete our reference form . For feedback about this website, contact rmcweb@cornell.edu .

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The USDA Economics, Statistics and Market Information System (ESMIS) is a collaborative project between Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University and several agencies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
The system contains nearly 2500 reports and datasets. These materials cover U.S. and international agriculture and related topics. Available titles include both current and historical data. Many of the current titles are available via email subscription.
Using the navigational panel which appears on the left side of every page on this system you may search for titles, browse all of the titles from an agency, or browse for titles by subject. The help link in the navigation bar may be used to obtain help from any page.

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Cornell Vicos Collection About the Vicos Collection The Program represents an optimistic view of both the possibilities for and the benefits of change. The contemporary North American view emphasized the importance of agricultural productivity as a means to improve closed, ignorant, impoverished communities such as Vicos. In addition, the social science of the time stressed the essential relationship between economic development national integration. The Vicosinos would exercise the duties of citizenship in exchange for the rights that the Peruvian nation afforded them. Evaluations of the Cornell-Peru Program describe it as a qualified success.

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