▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to initiate a search.

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

Organization

Person

City

Country

Province Or State

Biography

The Notable New Yorkers Web site offers audio recordings and transcripts of interviews with ten influential New Yorkers, drawn from the collections of the Oral History Research Office of the Columbia University Libraries . These interviews, conducted by the Office between 1955 and 2001, open an imaginative portal into twentieth-century New York City and the ways in which it has deeply affected the culture and history of the United States and the world beyond.

0
♥ 0
152 reads

Welcome to the Hoagy Carmichael Collection! This multimedia web site is part of an 18-month project to catalog, digitize, and preserve every item in Indiana University's extensive collections pertaining to the life and career of master songwriter Hoagland "Hoagy" Carmichael (1899-1981). Carmichael grew up in Bloomington, Indiana, and graduated from the Indiana University (IU) School of Law. He composed his enduring pop standard, "Star Dust," in Bloomington, and the story of its creation has become an integral part of local history.

0
♥ 0
152 reads

The Encyclopedia of Pennsylvania Biography was published irregularly from 1914 to 1967 by the Lewis Publishing Company. Biographies profile thousands of prominent Pennsylvanians who contributed to the development of the Commonwealth in many fields of endeavor. The online version offered by Penn State contains ONLY the volumes of the Encyclopedia known to be in the public domain (the first 14 volumes published before 1923). Additional volumes are available in the Penn State University Libraries' collection. Search The CAT to determine the location of the print volumes. To locate other libraries that have copies, consult OCLC WorldCat, where you can search many libraries at once for an item and then locate it in a library nearby.

0
♥ 0
133 reads

This exploration of the life of Sir Winston Churchill has been created by the National Library of Scotland and the Churchill Archives Centre, and is based on a major exhibition in the National Library of Scotland in the summer of 1999. It uses original documents and photographs to tell the story of one of the twentieth century's most important figures.

0
♥ 0
134 reads

Robert Burns was born into a farming family at Alloway in Ayrshire in 1759. He died in Dumfries at the early age of 37. Yet in that short time he had taken the Scottish literary world by storm, and had secured a place for himself in history and in legend.

This site is based on material by or relating to 'Scotland's Bard' which is held by the National Library of Scotland (except where otherwise stated).

Special features are pages giving highlights of the Library's significant resources – whether original letters or poems (see Manuscripts page) or important books (see Books page).

0
♥ 0
160 reads

Muriel Spark was identified as a promising and creative writer when her name was still Muriel Camberg and she was still at school. Some of her poems had already been published by the time she won her first poetry prize, at the age of 12.

Dame Muriel – poet, writer of fiction and literary criticism, and biographer – went on to win most of the literary awards going, was never out of print, and was at the top of her profession, internationally, for more than half a century.

Best-known as the author of 'The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie', Muriel decided in the 1940s to keep a record of her professional and personal activities, beginning a personal archive that is now one of the largest and most comprehensive held by the National Library of Scotland.

0
♥ 1
113 reads

This site features a selection of leading Scottish writers, photographed in a 30-year period by Edinburgh publisher and photographer Gordon Wright. It is based on an exhibition held at the National Library of Scotland in 2001.

Gordon Wright's photographs featured in 'The Write Stuff' are in copyright. For permission to use them, and to order print or digital copies, please email Gordon Wright.

Texts by Jennie Renton, editor of 'The Scottish Book Collector'.

0
♥ 0
144 reads

Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh’s New Town in 1850. He died 44 years later on a small Samoan island in the Pacific.

During his short life he travelled the world, defied convention, and made himself one of the most famous writers of the 19th century.

Here we tell Stevenson's story, illustrated with material held in the National Library of Scotland's collections.

You can also see the entire first English edition of Kidnapped – one of his most famous tales – published in 1886.

0
♥ 0
105 reads

In 1603, two very different nations were brought together by the curious fact that they only had one monarch between them.

On the death of England's Queen Elizabeth I without children, the next in line to the throne was the reigning king of Scotland, King James VI. James won the backing of the English establishment as he was a Protestant, he had sons who could be king after him, and his 36-year rule in Scotland had largely been a success.

However, he was also a Scot, who spoke a different language and had a different cultural background. How would he be able to bring the two countries together?

0
♥ 0
135 reads

The aim of the VICTORIAN WOMEN WRITERS' LETTERS PROJECT is to make available through electronic publication the correspondences of early to mid-Victorian British women writers in a form that attempts to capture the multiplexity of epistolary communication.

0
♥ 0
197 reads

Abraham Lincoln Association Serials Between 1940 and 1952, the Abraham Lincoln Association published fifty-two issues of The Abraham Lincoln Quarterly , a journal with original articles regarding all facets of Abraham Lincoln's life and the world in which he lived.  According to ALA President G. W.

0
♥ 0
131 reads

Coming Soon NC Architects and Builders is a growing system. We will post this entry as soon as it is ready. About Copyright This compilation copyright NC State University. We encourage fair use of this site for non-profit research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to US copyright law. Users are free to cite and link to the content without asking for permission. Cite as [Author], "[Title of entry]," North Carolina Architects and Builders: A Biographical Dictionary , Copyright & Digital Scholarship Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, NC. Some materials in NC Architects and Builders are copyrighted by owners other than the NCSU Libraries and NC State University. Please consult copyright information provided with the individual items for details.

0
♥ 0
193 reads

Scope and Content "Picturing Golda Meir" is a collection of images documenting the life of Golda Meir from her childhood in Pinsk, Russia, through her school years in Milwaukee, her pioneer years in Palestine in the 1920s, to the peak of her political career as Prime Minister of Israel (1969 - 1974). The photographs picture the former student of the Milwaukee Normal School in key historical moments, signing Israel's Proclamation of Independence, delivering speeches at the United Nations, conferring with heads of state, and visiting wounded soldiers during the Yom Kippur War. The collection also includes photographs of her private life with family and friends.

0
♥ 0
141 reads

Muriel Simonson at Jackson College 1924-1929: a biographical exhibit Welcome to the online biographical exhibit about Muriel Simonson, who had been an exceptionally talented student of Jackson College, Tufts University, in the 1920s. This exhibit highlights Muriel's academic and athletic achievements and the fact that she was the first undergraduate theater producer (male or female) at Tufts University while also documenting her much-lauded acting and singing. Muriel Simonson's years at Jackson College are presented within the larger institutional, historical, economic, and gender contexts of her time.

0
♥ 0
119 reads

  When Donald Winslow (A34, MA35), contacted the Digital Collections and Archives in 2007, we decided to create an autobiographical online exhibit containing his memories of Tufts. I had just completed an exhibit about Muriel Simonson (A'29) . A few years younger than Muriel, Donald Winslow and John Holmes (A'29) , Muriel's fiancee, were contemporaries at Tufts, with John Holmes first working as assistant in English at Tufts and then returning as instructor of English in 1934 when Donald began his MA in English.

0
♥ 0
175 reads

Holmes was a part of many different and overlapping worlds. His poetry and other literary endeavors constitute one such world, but there were also worlds of family, friends, colleagues, his lifetime relationship with Tufts, as well as the realities of the larger world. These exhibits provide insights into some parts of Holmes' world, primarily through his poetry.

As a teacher and mentor of young poets, Holmes was concerned about imparting the work of writing poetry to his students. Using drafts and notes as well as letters and sketches which are contained in the collection, this exhibit traces the evolution of several poems from first draft to finished product.

5.04
♥ 0
241 reads

was born May 28, 1894 in Sterling, Massachusetts. One of four children, Donald had an older sister and brother, Josephine and Malcolm, and a younger sister Jean. A graduate of Medford High School, class of 1912 and Tufts College, class of 1916, Donald turned his love of modern languages into a profession of school teacher. These two interests led him to France in 1920, onto Germany in 1922, and then back to France. He opened a school in 1924 in St. Cloud outside of Paris and firmly established himself in the realm of international education in France.

0
♥ 0
210 reads

Edward R. Murrow (1908-1965) is best known as a CBS broadcaster and producer during the formative years of U.S. radio and television news programs from the 1930s to the 1950s, when radio still dominated the airwaves although television was beginning to make its indelible mark, particularly in the US. Over the decades, numerous publications have portrayed Murrow as one of the architects of U.S. broadcast news, but in the political climate of recent years, he is increasingly viewed as a defender of rights against McCarthy-type witch hunts. The Life and Work of Edward R. Murrow is an online exhibit featuring Murrow's career from his student days to his work for USIA.

0
♥ 0
150 reads

History of Medicine The Man Stanley Jablonski said that he had a natural curiosity and that he liked to go into depth with things. With such a predisposition it’s no surprise that he developed into an accomplished, some say unequalled, indexer. Born in Poland, Jablonski eventually made his way to America. In 1949 he was hired by Claudius Mayer as an indexer in the Army Medical Library’s Bibliographic Services Division. Though he lacked the advanced education of most of his peers, Stanley excelled at his work and was rewarded with recognition and advancement. He could index medical literature in 10 languages. In 1955 he conceived a project to produce a bibliography of Slavic medical literature produced in the previous decade.

0
♥ 1
139 reads

History of Medicine John Ballard Blake, Ph.D. Historian John Blake made significant contributions to the field of medical history. He was educated at Yale, BA, 1943, with Honors in History, Harvard, MA, 1947, and Ph.D., 1954, in American history. He was among the first generation of historians of medicine to come out of history departments, rather than clinical medicine, and he helped integrate the subject into the broader field of social history. His interests were primarily the history of public health in America and women’s history. His books and articles dealt with public health in 18th and early 19th century Boston, medicine in colonial America, and women and medicine in 19th century America.

0
♥ 0
186 reads

Linus Pauling, an OSU alum (Oregon Agricultural College, class of 1922), was among the most decorated of American scientists. He received his first honorary doctorate from his alma mater in 1933, and in rapid succession was similarly honored by institutions including Oxford University, the University of Chicago, Princeton University, Cambridge University and the Sorbonne. By the time of his death, Pauling had been awarded forty-seven honorary doctorates. Not included in this total is the honorary diploma received in 1962 from Washington High School in Portland, Oregon.

0
♥ 0
196 reads

Introduction In 1999, inspired by the remarkable success of the Human Genome Project, the OSU Libraries Special Collections launched an ambitious undertaking that seeks to closely-document virtually every day of Linus and Ava Helen Pauling's lives. The result is Linus Pauling Day-by-Day, a constantly-expanding resource that provides in-depth description for a substantial portion of the half-million item Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers. This huge amount of data is presented in easy-to-use calendar form. Index pages created for each year of the Day-by-Day calendar provide an overview of the major events in the Paulings' lives, a full accounting of their travel and snapshots from their various adventures at home and abroad.

0
♥ 0
124 reads

About the Ezra Cornell Papers Preface Ezra Cornell referred to himself as a farmer and mechanic who had spent some time working in the telegraph industry. His ambition and imagination, however, were not so prosaic. Skillful work, uncommon tenacity, and fortuitous circumstances resulted in his amassing a fortune. As soon as it became clear that it was a fortune, he promptly rejected conventional practice and sage advice, and directed that those riches be used to found a unique university: a comprehensive and practical institution dedicated to all forms of intellectual endeavor.

0
♥ 1
133 reads

About Wayman Crow The youngest in a family of twelve children, Wayman Crow was born in Hartford, Kentucky, on March 7, 1808. Crow first entered the dry goods business in 1820, when he began a five-year apprenticeship in a general dry goods store in Kentucky. By 1828, he was operating his own dry goods store, and he moved to St. Louis in 1835. In partnership with his cousin, Joshua Tevis of Philadelphia, he established the wholesale dry goods house of Crow & Tevis. In later years, the business would be known as Crow, McCreery & Company Crow, Hargadine & Company, and Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company. In 1840, Crow was elected to the Missouri state senate, on the Whig ticket. He was elected to a second term in the senate in 1850.

0
♥ 0
191 reads

Marking 100 years since H.H. Asquith became Prime Minister 100 years ago H.H. Asquith (1852-1928) became Prime Minister. In continuous office for over eight years from 1908 to 1916, he was at the helm of a government which re-modelled the British political landscape and introduced innovatory social measures. The introduction of old age pensions, national insurance, and employment exchanges, and the reform of the House of Lords, are among the developments chronicled in Asquith's papers and those of his political colleagues held at the Bodleian . Long standing issues such as Irish home rule and women's suffrage also had to be addressed.

0
♥ 0
134 reads

Charles Deering, son of William and Abbey Reed (Barbour) Deering, was born on July 31, 1852, in South Paris, Maine. His father was the founder of Deering, Miliken & Company, and later of Gammon & Deering, manufacturers of harvesters and the predecessor of the Deering Harvester Company, organized in 1880. This latter company merged with International Harvester Company in 1902.

0
♥ 0
207 reads

About Us The University of Idaho Library has grown from a single classroom located in the University Administration Building in 1892, to become the largest library in the state of Idaho. The University of Idaho library houses well over a million books and almost ten thousand periodical subscriptions, in print and online. It has served for over a century as an official regional depository of U.S. federal government publications, making almost two million government documents available to the public.

0
♥ 1
165 reads

UAF is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution. Maintained by UAF-APR-reference-Service@alaska.edu Page last modified Website designed by WebWeavers Technology Group

0
♥ 0
189 reads

S. Charles Lee (1899-1990) graduated from Technical College, Chicago in 1918 and the Armour Institute of Technology in 1921. He relocated to Los Angeles in 1922 where he designed numerous theaters and office buildings (1927-40), developed the Los Angeles International Industrial District (1948) and built several theaters in Mexico City (1942). The Collection contains drawings, renderings, blueprints, photographs, and surveys relating to Lee's professional career including his work as a developer and the most prolific architect of art deco movie palaces in Los Angeles.

0
♥ 1
483 reads

The H.D. Papers are the bequest of Norman Holmes Pearson, H.D.'s literary executor. Most of the material in the H. D. Papers came to the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library after Professor Pearson's death in 1973. Prior to this time, selected groups of materials were given to the library by Professor Pearson and were placed with related documents in other collections; these materials have been retrieved and placed in the H.D. Papers. Materials from other sources are also found in the papers, with specific provenance information on the appropriate folders. Permission from the H.D. Estate is required to publish H.D. materials in any format. To learn more, contact the Curator, Yale Collection of American Literature. Call Number: YCAL MSS 24

0
♥ 1
143 reads