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Arts & Humanities

& Welcome to the Fine Arts Print Collection website, a collaborative venture of the , and the . The Print Collection is part of the Fine Art Collection, owned by the Department of Art and managed by the Fairbanks Gallery at Oregon State University. Web and software support has been provided by the staff of the Valley Library. Use the Search or Browse features to view items in the collection. Throughout your search, you can get help with search functions by clicking the help link in the top navigation bar. Customize options for search results, My Favorites, Compare and Slideshow views. View, compare, delete and move collection items you have saved to My Favorites within CONTENTdm.

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African Political Ephemera and Realia Project Search Browse The African Political Ephemera and Realia Project is an online collection of ephemeral material - pamphlets, t-shirts, cloths, posters, to name just a few examples - that documents the material culture of politics in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ephemeral political material often does not find its way into institutional collections either because the material is discarded before it draws the attention of collectors, because it is too popular and mass-produced to merit consideration as art, or because it does not fit easily (either physically or intellectually) into the book- and manuscript-based realm of libraries.

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About - Artists' Books at the University of Oregon Libraries Artists' books have been described as the "quintessential 20th century art form" (Drucker, Johanna. The Century of Artists Books. New York: Granary Books, 1994), and indeed, though there were many predecessors to the contemporary artist's book, the form was really born in the late '50s and early '60s. The collection at the Architecture and Allied Arts Library, which is supported and extended by artists' books in Knight Library's Special Collections, spans the history of these works of art in book form from 1957 to books by artists today with special emphasis on artists working in the Pacific Northwest.

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The Collection The 102 photographs in this collection document the activities of Oregon's Bracero workers - their cultivation and harvesting work in the fields and orchards as well as the farm labor camps in which they lived. Most of the photographs were taken by Oregon State College Extension staff members as part of a larger effort to document the various groups that contributed to alleviate the state's severe shortage of farm labor. Extension photographers included John Burtner, Fred Shideler, Robert Fowler, and Harry Whitten.

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About - Building Oregon Building Oregon: Architecture of Oregon and the Pacific Northwest provides approximately 20,000 images and documentation about the architectural heritage of the Pacific Northwest with special emphasis on Oregon’s historic sites and built environment. A significant number of images come from slides donated to the University of Oregon Libraries, including the collections of architectural historian Marion Dean Ross , preservationist Michael Shellenbarger, and architect C. Gilman Davis. As a result of continuing collaboration with the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office , many documents in the collection represent works listed on the National Register of Historic Places .

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About - Historic Sheet Music The Oregon Music Collection The Oregon Music Collection brings together 55 pieces of music about Oregon or by Oregonians, published between 1880 and 1921. These represent holdings in the Oregon Collection of the University of Oregon’s Special Collections & University Archives and in the Historic Sheet Music Collection in the Music Services Department. Many of the songs and pieces are about or dedicated to specific Oregon events and places, including student songs from the University of Oregon and the Oregon Agricultural College (now Oregon State), the Portland Rose Festival, the Pendleton Round Up, the 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exhibition, Oregon regiments in the Spanish-American War, and the Willamette and Columbia rivers.

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About - Historical Photographs Working in concert with Metadata Services and Digital Projects , staff in Special Collections & University Archives selected several representative photographic collections for digitization and online display. Selection criteria were based on several factors, including the historic content of the photographs, the pure visual appeal of individual images, and finally, research requests from the past. The larger goal of the University of Oregon Photograph Collection is to make the public aware of the quality and depth of the photograph collections owned by Special Collections & University Archives and to encourage further research on the original photographic materials.

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Leslie Jones worked for the Boston Herald-Traveler newspaper between the years 1917 and 1956. He was educated at the Farm and Trade School on Thompson Island. Jones first worked as a pattern-maker, but had long held an interest in photography. While working in a Boston factory, he continued developing himself as a freelance photographer. It was not until Jones unfortunately lost two of his fingers to the factory machinery, however, which led him to convert this avocation into his profession. He joined the Boston Herald-Traveler staff in 1917.

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About - Lesbian Intentional Communities: Ruth Mountaingrove Photographs The Ruth Mountaingrove Papers include textual and graphical materials. The collection is currently arranged into four series, beginning with correspondence, diaries, ephemera and finally, photographs. The photograph series (Series IV) is currently the only series within this collection that is processed and available for research use. Ruth's photographs depict her life on lesbian land, and as a member of the national feminist/lesbian network.

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About the Collection In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the OSU Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in 2007 and 2008. These interviews help to tell the story of extension in Oregon during the 50 years after World War II. They cover areas including agriculture, 4-H, home economics, energy, community development, Sea Grant, communications, and administration and support. The original interviews and transcripts have been placed in the University Archives. Two additional interviews from the Archives’ collection, conducted in the 1980s and early 1990s, are also included. Interviews are available via the OSU Libraries’ streaming server. Transcripts and photographs are also available online. Interviews

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About - Northwest Folklife Digital Collection The Archives of Northwest Folklore recently partnered with the UO Libraries to begin the development of a digital library collection of folklore materials drawn from fieldwork collections in the Archives of Northwest Folklore. The project team decided to begin with the Oregon Arts Commission's Folk Art of the Oregon Country project records, a collection of 7,000 slides that document folk artists and folk art in cultural communities across Oregon in 1979. Archives of Northwest Folklore student archivists and volunteers have scanned 2,500 slides using equipment in the UO Libraries’ Visual Resources Center.

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About - Oregon Percent for Art Background When an artist applies for a Percent for Art award, the Oregon Arts Commission (OAC) requires that (s)he submit slides, 8 x 10 black and white prints or 35mm negatives of their artwork, along with textual documentation describing the materials used in creating the work. In addition, some artists choose to submit illustrative proposals or project mockups. Many applicants also provide an artist statement as well as an exhibition list or resume. These materials are then reviewed for artist merit and suitability to the facility.

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About - Picturing the Cayuse, Walla Walla, and Umatilla Tribes Major Lee Moorhouse of Pendleton, Oregon was an Indian Agent for the Umatilla Indian Reservation and a photographer. From 1888 to 1916 he produced over 9,000 images which document urban, rural, and Native American life in the Columbia Basin, and particularly Umatilla County, Oregon. So extensive and revealing are Moorhouse's images that his collection is one of the preeminent social history collections for Oregon. Special Collections & University Archives of the University of Oregon Libraries has a collection of 7000 images by Major Moorhouse.

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About Scholars' Bank Welcome to Scholars' Bank , an open-access digital repository created to capture, distribute and preserve the intellectual output of the University of Oregon. Scholars' Bank is maintained by the University of Oregon Libraries, under the coordination of Digital Library Services . Using the open-source software DSpace, available from MIT and Hewlett Packard, Scholars' Bank provides stable, long-term storage needed to house the digital products of UO faculty and researchers. If you are interested in starting a community or contributing to an existing community contact a Scholars' Bank representative at scholars@uoregon.edu .

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  browse through the collection without a specific search   search multiple fields at one time and limit search results   view collection items you have saved to your own favorites page   ask an archivist about this site or any aspect of OSU archives   Click on the highlighted areas.

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The University Archives Photograph Collection contains modern and vintage photographic prints related to the University of Oregon. The photographs depict a variety of buildings, historic scenes, events, students, faculty and staff, and scenes of campus life.

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The Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections , Cornell University Library , is home to the Andrew Dickson White Architectural Photographs Collection of approximately 13,000 nineteenth- and early twentieth-century photographs of architecture, decorative arts and sculpture. White (1832-1918), the first president of Cornell University, established the collection by donating several thousand images from his personal architectural library.

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About the Project This digital collection references the canonical works or &#8220major moments&#8221 that have come to be regarded as important in the study of South Asian architectural traditions. Images of rites, festivals and customary practices enrich and clarify the material record and situate canonical architecture in broader understandings of landscape experience and artistic production. A sub collection of images from 89 Aiyanar temples in Tamil Nadu, South India is one special aspect of this database. It draws on Robert MacDougall&#8217s unfinished study of a folk tradition. Another unique aspect of the database is a collection of images of domestic architecture and community life in Sri Lanka.

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The Billie Jean Isbell Andean Collection This collection of materials is derived from my years of research in the Andes, primarily in the southern Andean department of Ayacucho and specifically in the village of Chuschi, Peru and the surrounding region of the River Pampas Valley in the province of Cangallo. I began research for an undergraduate honors' thesis in 1967 and the earliest images are from that date and continue through 2002. Included in this collection are approximately 1500 photographs, thirteen songs, my ethnography, To Defend Ourselves: Ecology and Ritual in an Andean Village , as well as selected publications. - Billie Jean Isbell, 2005 Visit Professor Isbell's latest project:

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Database selection The goal of this project is to catalog and digitize each of the 1,780 slides within the Claire Holt collection. Microsoft Excel was selected as the application most suited to cataloguing requirements. Image browser After researching options available for creating and maintaining a widely-accessible virtual collection, Luna Imaging’s In sight® browsing software was selected as the most appropriate way to present the Claire Holt images over the Internet.

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The story of American agriculture is captured in a broad band of documentary resources ranging from the memoirs and transactions of early agriculture societies to newspapers and almanacs; family, community, and corporate archives; and state and county extension service publications. The evolution of farm and rural life and agricultural economy is chronicled in the agriculture periodical press and the numerous local, regional, and national farm journals that exhorted, informed, and shaped the opinions, values, and concerns of early farm families. Journals such as Country Life in America , Cappers' Farmer , and Farm and Family have much to tell historians about the daily activities, issues, and practices of the time.

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About The Cornell East Asia Book Series (CEAS), published by the East Asia Program, is well known within the scholarly community for publishing quality books at affordable prices. We have a well-maintained website , and distribute our own books to the academic community and the public at large via mail-order and a secure online bookstore. We have published many books of lasting historical and literary value since the series was founded in 1972, when the publication was called the Cornell University East Asia Papers and the program was called the China-Japan Program. Some of these titles have gone out of print, mostly due to financial limitations. Here we are making available the best of our out-of-print collection. Most books are text-only, some include pictures and maps.

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Cornell Modern Indonesia Collection Professor George Kahin's introduction to the first "Interim Report" describes the concerns and intentions of CMIP's editors. Prof. Kahin noted that, "With respect to much of the research carried out in post-revolutionary Indonesia, there has been a lag of two to three or more years between the termination of field work and the first publication describing the results of this work" and " ... the delay has been particularly regrettable inasmuch as the extent of research [on Indonesia] being undertaken is so limited." For this reason, the editors proposed to invite researchers to make their findings available in a provisional form, as CMIP "Interim Reports," or working papers, before the publication of their finished books.

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About GloPAD GloPAD (Global Performing Arts Database) records include authoritative, detailed, multilingual descriptions of digital images, texts, video clips, sound recordings, and complex media objects related to the performing arts around the world, plus information about related pieces, productions, performers, and creators. GloPAD is in a continual process of development: we have recently merged two related databases, restructured GloPAD to support our newly developed metadata standards, and redesigned the user interface. Approximately 4,500 objects are currently available, with new records added and older records revised on a daily basis.

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The Cornell University Witchcraft Collection Part of Cornell University Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell's Witchcraft Collection contains over 3,000 titles documenting the history of the Inquisition and the persecution of witchcraft, primarily in Europe. How to Find Materials The Witchcraft Collection is open to the public. To schedule a research visit or ask a question, please fill out our reference form . Terms of access and research policies are described on the Division’s Registration & Guidelines for Use and Reproductions & Permissions pages. See our Digital Witchcraft Collection to view 104 English language books from Cornell’s Witchcraft Collection.

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A native Ithacan and the nation's most notable ornithological painter since Audubon. Cornell University holds a large collection of his bird illustrations, as well as his personal papers. You will find here a database with 2500 of these illustrations, as well as an exhibit based on the journal he kept during the 1899 Harriman Alaska expedition. Site design by John Greek. Most recent site update: October 8, 2001.

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The Johnson Museum has one of the finest collections of art in New York State and is recognized as one of the most important university museums in the country. Spanning the history of art, the Museum's collections are especially strong in Asian art, nineteenth- and twentieth-century American art, and the graphic arts.

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About the Project A first segment of this proposed collection includes documents that pertain to the legacy of Marx and Freud (but also Lenin and Lacan) in Latin America. In particular, the complete collection of the journal Los Libros in Argentina, which played a key role in intellectual life, and still continues to do so today, even though very few people in the world have access to it now. This journal, which was closed by the military Junta in 1976, combined literary and cultural analysis with an increasingly political interrogation of events both in Argentina and abroad.

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What is Home Economics? The term "home economics" may call up stereotypical images of girls busily sewing and cooking in 1950s classrooms, images that have led many people to view this field as fundamentally narrow, dull, and socially conservative. In the 1960s and 1970s, the women's movement was often critical of home economics, seeing it as a discipline that worked to restrict girls and women to traditional domestic and maternal roles.

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Home economics at Cornell began as part of the Extension Service in 1900, with the Farmers’ Wives Reading Course, supported by Liberty Hyde Bailey (Dean of the College of Agriculture) and implemented by Martha Van Rensselaer. In 1903-1904, Van Rensselaer, Bailey, and Anna Botsford Comstock gave three courses within the College of Agriculture relating to home and family life. In 1907, Bailey decided to create a Department of Home Economics, headed by Martha Van Rensselaer and Flora Rose, who were appointed to professorships (the first for women at Cornell) in 1911. The department became a school in 1919, and, in 1925, the first state-chartered College of Home Economics in the country. Martha Van Rensselaer and Flora Rose were named co-directors.

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