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Introduction At the end of the nineteenth century, the British artist, photographer and traveler Frederick W.W. Howell, F.R.G.S., recorded Icelandic and Faroese landscapes, farmsteads, towns and people in a remarkable series of photographs that depicted Iceland and the Faeroe Islands on the edge of modernity. Daniel Willard Fiske, who bequeathed the Fiske Icelandic Collection to Cornell University, purchased over 400 prints from Howell around the turn of the century. Halldór Hermannsson, the collection’s first curator, mounted the prints around 1923 in six albums and supplied the prints with captions. (A small group of photographs includes the work of Henry A.

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This site presents digital reproductions of images from the University Archives and from rare books and manuscripts held by the Cornell University Library. The images are delivered via Luna Insight® image browser . Please adjust your browser to allow pop-up windows before attempting to launch the collection. If you continue to experience technical difficulties, please report your problem to vrhelp-l@cornell.edu . For reference questions, please complete our reference form . For questions or comments about this website, send E-mail to rmcweb@cornell.edu .

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About the Project The Cornell Institute for Resource Information Sciences (IRIS) maintains a large and comprehensive collection of aerial photographs for New York State dating from 1936 through 1995. The archive numbers some 50,000 images that cover 48 counties, many counties of which have at least three years of historic sequence. The photographs are primarily black and white direct contact prints, and in hard copy form they measure from 7” x 9” to 9” x 9” in size; scales vary. Historic aerial photographs are valuable resources for landscape and land use analysis, assessment of environmental impacts, development projects and education.

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About the Project The Cornell University Library New York State Historical Literature Collection consists of digital surrogates for materials that were part of a joint study involving Digital Preservation between Cornell University and the Xerox Corporation . Begun in 1990, a process was developed where brittle and decaying books were digitally scanned, using prototype equipment co-developed by Cornell and the Xerox Corporation (the CLASS scanner) and stored as 600dpi, bitonal TIFF images, compressed with ITU Group 4 compression, on digital platters on an EPOCH "jukebox" digital server. Facsimiles of these books were generated and the books were returned to the shelves.

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About the Journal Medieval Philosophy and Theology is a semi-annual, peer-reviewed, online journal devoted to the publication of original articles in all areas of medieval philosophy, including logic and natural science, and in medieval theology, including Christian, Jewish, and Islamic. Coverage extends from the Patristic period through the neoscholasticism of the seventeenth century. Members of the Editorial Board and the panel of Editorial Advisors represent eleven different countries in Europe and North America, as well as a wide range of academic, disciplinary, and scholarly traditions and approaches. Medieval Philosophy and Theology occasionally publishes review articles and article-length critical discussions of important books in the field.

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About Heiner Müller was born in Eppendorf, eastern Germany, in 1929 and died in Berlin in 1995. He was one of the major East German writers and indisputably the most important German dramatist (some would argue European dramatist) in the latter half of the twentieth century. His 30 plays helped reconfigure the notion of modern theatre in European and Anglo-Saxon venues and a number of his most important works (Hamletmachine, Quartett, Medea Material, The Mission) have been translated and staged in many parts of the world. Alexander Kluge was born in Halberstadt, Germany in 1932 and after earning a law degree has gone on to distinguish himself as a leading writer, cultural theoretician, film maker and public intellectual.

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About the Project Welcome to Cornell University Library's web site on issues of race, ethnicity and religion. The incentive behind the project was provided by the interest expressed in 2004 by University President Jeffrey S. Lehman, the Provost, the Vice Provost, the Cornell University Librarian and the Cornell University Press in collaborating on a web-based project that would facilitate informed study and discussion of issues related to race, ethnicity and religion on the Cornell campus and in the U.S. In its initial pilot phase (Nov.

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About the Project Named after the pioneering critic of the commercialization of mass media, the late Professor Rose Goldsen of Cornell University, the Archive was founded in 2002 by Timothy Murray to house international art work produced on CD-Rom, DVD-Rom, video, digital interfaces, and the internet. Its collection of supporting materials includes unpublished manuscripts and designs, catalogues, monographs, and resource guides to new media art.

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more » Need more help? Browse subjects to find your area of interest. more » Need more help? Contact an expert in your area of study. more » Need help getting around? View D. H. Hill Library Map . Search books, articles, journals, & library website About the SCRC Introduction to the 1994 Architectural Records Survey This booklet is a survey of architectural records held in repositories, government agencies, architectural firms, and private collections throughout North Carolina. The aim of this survey is to begin to unite the scattered architectural collections across the state and to initiate the process for developing a statewide collection strategy and appraisal program for North Carolina architectural records.

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Green 'N' Growing is a resource-based research and educational web site developed by the Special Collections Research Center at the North Carolina State University Libraries. Drawing upon the rich historical records found in the University Archives, the collection provides valuable information about women, children, race relations, education, agriculture, and rural life in North Carolina during the twentieth century. Users will be able to access digital reproductions of over 10,000 items, including photographs and pages from pamphlets, reports, and other materials, that document the history of 4-H and Home Demonstration in North Carolina from the 1900s to the 1970s.

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This animal rights research site was designed by the NCSU Computer Science Senior Design Center students Shane Smith, Brenda Loehfelm, Sherry Pitz, Alan Seales, and Matt Senter, in consultation with the NSCU Libraries’ Special Collections, Digital Library Initiatives, and Systems Departments.

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Note that Albert Einstein is standing to the left of the President. This group shot was taken by Fred Scut of Washington, DC, one of the most prolific of panoramic photographers. The print size is 38" x 10". Records of the Office of the Secretary of Agriculture (16-ES-485) The description was handwritten on the photograph by Mr. Brooks. It was taken by Thompson Photo of Venice, CA, and measures 46" x 10". Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (75-PA-3-7) The photographer and date are unknown. The dimensions of the print are 54" x 10".

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From June through October 1973 and briefly during the spring of 1974, John H. White, a 28-year-old photographer with the Chicago Daily News , worked for the federal government photographing Chicago, especially the city`s African American community. White took his photographs for the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) DOCUMERICA project.

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During the depths of the Great Depression of the 1930s and into the early years of World War II, the Federal government supported the arts in unprecedented ways. For 11 years, between 1933 and 1943, federal tax dollars employed artists, musicians, actors, writers, photographers, and dancers. Never before or since has our government so extensively sponsored the arts. MORE... This link is not functional because your browser does not support JavaScript or Javascript has been disabled. Please use this link to MORE...

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Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President "Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President" February 12, 1998 through September 1, 1999 Garden Room, Truman Library & Museum The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum is one of thirteen Presidential Libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration . 500 W. US Hwy. 24. Independence MO 64050 truman.library@nara.gov ; Phone: 816-268-8200 or 1-800-833-1225; Fax: 816-268-8295.

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Federal Designs: Symbolism Symbols are an important part of America`s design heritage. They establish and reinforce the national identity and patriotism. In some cases, American symbols are based on recognized associations. The ideals of Greek democracy, the power of Imperial Rome, or the refinements of European fashion frequently are reflected in Federal designs. At other times and for other purposes, designers created icons using images unique to this new country, to this new form of government, and to America`s aspirations to world power.

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Inside the National Archives Southeast Region 1. Welcome The Southeast Region of the National Archives holds in trust original records documenting the settlement and development of a unique section of the United States. It maintains historical records from regional offices of Federal agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. These records are the documentary evidence of day-to-day occurrences that have become part of our history. This presentation highlights treasures in the region's holdings. It tells intriguing stories of the people who once inhabited this land. Some documents are about famous people and events.

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A note on the photographs in this exhibition Because of the huge number of images held by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), selecting photographs for this exhibition involved difficult and subjective choices. For the most part, the exhibit concentrates on developments within American society and on activities abroad where Americans were significant participants. The photographs from the White House Photo Office were included because they will become part of the Clinton Presidential Library, and because they allowed the exhibit to round out its coverage of the late 20th century.

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Guns, tanks, and bombs were the principal weapons of World War II, but there were other, more subtle forms of warfare as well. Words, posters, and films waged a constant battle for the hearts and minds of the American citizenry just as surely as military weapons engaged the enemy. Persuading the American public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. The Government launched an aggressive propaganda campaign with clearly articulated goals and strategies to galvanize public support, and it recruited some of the nation's foremost intellectuals, artists, and filmmakers to wage the war on that front.

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The President's Daily Diary: November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969 The secretaries outside the Oval Office prepared President Johnson's Daily Diary. Juanita Roberts, the President's personal secretary, assigned the responsibility of preparing the Diary to secretaries in the office. A particular person would "work" the Diary for a scheduled period. As visits and telephone calls occurred, the secretary "working" the Diary would note them; occasionally the secretary missed noting a call or meeting. White House staff who worked closely with the President frequently entered the Oval Office without the visit being noted in the Diary.

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The National Archives and Records Administration Clifford K. Berryman: Political Cartoonist Extraordinaire In 1886 at the age of 17, Clifford K. Berryman moved from Kentucky to Washington, DC, to work at the U.S. Patent Office, where he used his self-taught talents to draw patent illustrations. He left the Patent Office in 1891 to become a cartoonist’s understudy for the Washington Post. Within five years, Berryman was chief cartoonist, a position he held until 1907 when he became the front-page cartoonist at the Washington Evening Star. Berryman drew political cartoons for the Star until his death in 1949 at the age of 80. Washington political circles embraced Berryman’s cartooning.

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What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

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This web site features approximately 320 digitally rendered images from a collection of over 15,000 photographic prints held by the University Archives of Washington University in St. Louis. This web site consists of five sections, namely: that will be on exhibit in the Department of Special Collections in Olin Library at Washington University in St. Louis from 25 May to 31 July 2001. Last modified: August 3, 2001

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Introduction by Anne Posega With these words Hanmer voiced England's growing national pride in Shakespeare, a pride materially represented by the numerous editions which were produced in the 18th century. Different editors argued for their textual emendations in prefaces, footnotes, and advertisements, and the debate fueled layer after layer of criticism and responses. In a similar way, the illustrations in these editions were themselves transforming, starting with the first illustrated edition in 1709. Edited by Nicolas Rowe and printed for Jacob Tonson, The Works of Mr. William Shakespear, in Six Volumes was the first edition to be "Adorn'd with cuts". The illustrations in this edition were generally theatrical in nature, with many looking like illustrations of a production.

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Overture At many universities, athletics was said to unite the student body, but at Washington before the First World War, dramatics came closest to filling that role ... With no more than occasional help from faculty members, usually in the English Department, and a few theater buffs in the city, students made Washington University the busiest center of theatrical activity in St. Louis --Ralph Morrow, Washington University in St. Louis: A History , p.242. In Curtain Time , the story of student performing arts at the University is told through programs, music scores, photographs, sound recordings, video, and artifacts from the University's historical record.

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Depicting Devotion: Illuminated Books of Hours from the Middle Ages December 5, 2001 - February 16, 2002 Curated by Kevin Kalish, Department of English and Christina Linsenmeyer van Schalkwyk, Department of Music Rarely does the opportunity come to peruse, page by page, through a medieval book or manuscript. This exhibit attempts just that. By following the arrangement of this exhibition, the viewer sees the structure and format of a Book of Hours writ large. Books of Hours, one specimen in the history of Illuminated Manuscripts, exhibit a vivid interplay between image and text.

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In keeping with its designer's intent, Washington University's Benjamin Brown Graham Memorial Chapel serves as a refuge to entertain both the intellectual and spiritual. The physical design of Graham is quite straightforward. The intellectual and spiritual impetus of the design of Graham is not. By sauntering through a forest of historical perspective, we will examine Graham's manner of conception by focusing on two elements: grotesques and glass.

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Collection Description 35,000 Items (164.5 linear feet) Access: Some restrictions. Contact curator. James Ingram Merrill was born in New York City on March 3, 1926, and grew up in Manhattan and Southampton. He was the son of Charles Merrill, co-founder of the brokerage firm Merrill Lynch, and his second wife, Hellen Ingram. He began writing poems at as a child, and at age sixteen, while he was in prep school, his father had a book of them privately printed under the title Jim’s Book . Merrill’s studies at Amherst College were interrupted by service in the U.S. Army from 1944 to 1945. Another book, The Black Swan , was privately printed in 1946 while he was still in college. Following his graduation in 1947, he taught for a year at Bard College.

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Site Search Hours | Site Index email    chat    phone    text My Library Accounts | Interlibrary Loan | Reserves A Description of the Arnold Semeiology Collection Perhaps the most varied and individual collection in the Special Collections of the Washington University Libraries, the Philip Mills Arnold Semeiology Collection now numbers approximately 1600 volumes, extending in time from the Ars Oratoria of Jacopo Publicio (Augsburg, 1490) to Charles Kasiel Bliss's International Semantography (Sydney, 1948-49), and ranging in subject matter from cryptography to the sign language of the deaf.

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This website, dedicated to the work by women artists in the collections of Washington University, was developed in 2001-2002 with the support of a grant from the Sam Fox Arts Center at Washington University in Saint Louis. The project was developed in concert with a course, "L01-3631 Creative Women: Modern Artists and Writers," co-taught in the Spring of 2002 by Elizabeth C. Childs, Associate Professor of Art History and Archaeology, and Helen Power, Senior Lecturer in Women's Studies. Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources in the Department of Art History and Archaeology, supervised the design and implementation of the site in consultation with Professor Childs and Dr. Sabine Eckmann, Curator of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.

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