▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to initiate a search.

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

Organization

Person

City

Country

Province Or State

Social Sciences

Edward R. Murrow (1908-1965) is best known as a CBS broadcaster and producer during the formative years of U.S. radio and television news programs from the 1930s to the 1950s, when radio still dominated the airwaves although television was beginning to make its indelible mark, particularly in the US. Over the decades, numerous publications have portrayed Murrow as one of the architects of U.S. broadcast news, but in the political climate of recent years, he is increasingly viewed as a defender of rights against McCarthy-type witch hunts. The Life and Work of Edward R. Murrow is an online exhibit featuring Murrow's career from his student days to his work for USIA.

0
♥ 0
219 reads

History of Medicine EVER SINCE THE INVENTION OF moveable type in the mid-1400s, the public’s appetite for tales of shocking murders —“true crime” —has been an enduring aspect of the market for printed material. For more than five centuries, murder pamphlets have been hawked on street corners, town squares, taverns, coffeehouses, news stands, and book shops. Typically, a local printer would put together a pamphlet that claimed to be a true account of a murder, consisting of a narrative, trial transcript, and/or written confession of the murderer before his or her execution. 13 September 2010

0
♥ 0
216 reads

Exhibition Healing Ways Uncover how diverse lifestyles and shared experiences have helped sustain the health and well-being of Native populations for generations. Hōkūle‘a Native Hawaiians owe their existence to the Hōkūle‘a voyaging canoe. Its resurgence in the last century has led to a cultural revival, inspiring Native Hawaiians of all ages to learn more about, and to value, their traditions. Healing Totem The National Library of Medicine’s healing totem was created by master carver Jewell James, of the Lummi Nation in the Pacific Northwest, to promote good health.

0
♥ 1
179 reads

History of Medicine Robert Hooke (1635-1703) was a remarkably versatile man — artist, biologist, physicist, engineer, architect, inventor, and more. However, his crowning glory was Micrographia: or Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies made by Magnifying Glasses , first published 1665. It was a masterpiece — an exquisitely illustrated introduction to the previously unknown microscopic world. This exhibit focuses on Hooke's influences and legacy in print, the pioneering books that stimulated Hooke's research, and the works he left for others — most famously the great Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhœk (1632-1723). August 1 – November 1, 2007.

0
♥ 1
498 reads

History of Medicine Guide to Tropical Disease Motion Pictures and Audiovisuals Introduction The Tropical Disease Motion Picture and Audiovisual Collection is comprised of films, videorecordings, and digital videocasts produced from the 1920s through 2009, with the majority shot prior to the 1960s. All are devoted to health concerns and include material on medicine and public health. Materials range from ideological, documentary, educational, and training films to American war propaganda. The intended audience is diverse and includes military personnel, health professionals, and the general public.

0
♥ 0
238 reads

History of Medicine Charlotte Perkins Gilman writing at her desk, ca. 1916-1922 Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, author and physician, 1906 Charlotte's doctor, nerve specialist Dr. S. Weir Mitchell, had built an eminent medical career working with soldiers injured during the Civil War. He then focused on the treatment of women with nervous exhaustion, devising a “rest cure” in which the patient was not allowed to read, write, feed herself, or talk to others.

0
♥ 0
254 reads

History of Medicine Rewriting the Book of Nature Charles Darwin and Evolutionary Theory Charles Darwin’s vision—“from so simple a beginning, endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being evolved”—now forms the foundation of the biological sciences. Radical in sweep, Darwin’s idea of naturally innovating and endlessly changing webs of life undercut all previous sciences. Darwin was instantly seen as a potent sign of a new science, a new way of conceiving the world. His theory was an immediate threat not just to those who were wedded to an older conception, but to all who relied on a given and settled order for meaning and for power.

0
♥ 1
200 reads

History of Medicine The Man Stanley Jablonski said that he had a natural curiosity and that he liked to go into depth with things. With such a predisposition it’s no surprise that he developed into an accomplished, some say unequalled, indexer. Born in Poland, Jablonski eventually made his way to America. In 1949 he was hired by Claudius Mayer as an indexer in the Army Medical Library’s Bibliographic Services Division. Though he lacked the advanced education of most of his peers, Stanley excelled at his work and was rewarded with recognition and advancement. He could index medical literature in 10 languages. In 1955 he conceived a project to produce a bibliography of Slavic medical literature produced in the previous decade.

0
♥ 1
197 reads

Exhibition We, the living, instinctively recoil in the presence of death. Whether the deceased is a beloved, a friend, or a stranger, the shock of death's finality registers. When a life is unexpectedly extinguished, we need answers and seek the cause. Today, this need is addressed in police investigations, laboratories, courtrooms, and all of the venues in which scientific medicine interacts with the law—the field of forensics. Visible Proofs is about the history of forensic medicine. Over the centuries, physicians, surgeons, and other professionals have struggled to develop scientific methods that translate views of bodies and body parts into "visible proofs" that can persuade judges, juries, and the public.

0
♥ 0
273 reads

History of Medicine John Ballard Blake, Ph.D. Historian John Blake made significant contributions to the field of medical history. He was educated at Yale, BA, 1943, with Honors in History, Harvard, MA, 1947, and Ph.D., 1954, in American history. He was among the first generation of historians of medicine to come out of history departments, rather than clinical medicine, and he helped integrate the subject into the broader field of social history. His interests were primarily the history of public health in America and women’s history. His books and articles dealt with public health in 18th and early 19th century Boston, medicine in colonial America, and women and medicine in 19th century America.

0
♥ 0
256 reads

History of Medicine Introduction Over the ages, philosophers, theologians, and physicians had accepted insanity disorders within their purview. By the late 18th century, however, the first two had largely withdrawn and physicians, social activists, and the state took responsibility for the care and treatment of the mentally ill. Psychiatry as a medical discipline came into being during the first years of the 19th century. The rapidly growing population of the United States during the 19th century, along with an ever increasing number of immigrants, gave rise to the need for provision for the poor, the sick, and the mentally ill. Publicly supported almshouses and hospitals were established and the special needs of the mentally ill led to the era of asylums.

0
♥ 0
202 reads

The Donald S. Fredrickson Papers Donald Fredrickson (1924-2002) was an American physiologist and biomedical research leader who made significant contributions to medicine over the course of four decades. Fredrickson's system of classification of abnormalities in fat transport was adopted by the World Health Organization as an international standard for identifying increased risks of coronary artery disease linked to the consumption of fats and cholesterol. He also discovered two genetic diseases caused by disorders in lipid metabolism.

0
♥ 0
243 reads

Discover the many ways that women have influenced and enhanced the practice of medicine. The individuals featured here provide an intriguing glimpse of the broader community of women doctors who are making a difference. The National Library of Medicine is pleased to present this exhibition honoring the lives and accomplishments of these women in the hope of inspiring a new generation of medical pioneers. This exhibition at the National Library of Medicine closed on November 19, 2005. Its traveling exhibition itinerary is available online. Please refer to "On Exhibit at NLM" on the Library's home page for information on the current exhibition on display at the Library. Perform your own customized database search to learn about the woman physicians featured in this exhibition.

0
♥ 0
206 reads

History of Medicine Introduction Medicine in the Americas is a digital library project that makes freely available original works demonstrating the evolution of American medicine from colonial frontier outposts of the 17th century to research hospitals of the 20th century. Drawing on the collections of NLM's History of Medicine Division and including works from the United States, Latin America, the Caribbean and Canada, this initial release of Medicine in the Americas encompasses monographs dating from 1610 to 1865. Additional titles, dating up to 1920 and drawing further upon NLM's comprehensive collection of early American printed books and journals, will be available on an ongoing basis in the future.

0
♥ 1
166 reads

Display of Goya Prints Featured at the NLM Thirteen prints by Francisco Goya (1746-1828) , a Spanish painter who stands among the first modern artists, are on display at the National Library of Medicine. Although Goya held a position as court painter to Spain's King Charles IV, he often mocked the powerful in his paintings and satirized Spain's government and church. His depictions of hospital patients, torture chambers, the poor, and people in complex psychological states, transformed the unmentionable into fit subjects for art. Two of the works are first editions created by Goya, while the others are "restrikes" printed by others using Goya's original plates.

0
♥ 0
248 reads

History of Medicine Introduction The history of medicine tells different stories and different truths depending on the questions we ask and the concerns we raise. That's why there is always something new in the past. This exhibition explores some of the multiple meanings people have found in the history of medicine within the United States. We see how, during the last two hundred years, the history of medicine has been created and used as weapon, as inspiration, as edifice, as politics, as profession, and as today's news. Physicians have used medical history to increase their understanding, to unify their profession, to develop a vision of the future of medicine, and to provide better medical care to their patients. History is like a kaleidoscope.

0
♥ 0
158 reads

Exhibition Directors' Statement The exhibition Emotions and Disease was initially developed by the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine, in conjunction with the Third International Congress of the International Society for Neuroimmunomodulation which met at the National Institutes of Health in November 1996. The exhibition was intended to provide historical perspective and context for the scientific discussions and presentations at the Congress and to explain to the general public the meaning and relevance of scientific developments linking neurophysiology to the functioning of our immune systems. Using the historical approach, we could make these sophisticated scientific developments more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

0
♥ 0
173 reads

Last updated: 14 January 2009 The Loss and Recovery of Greek Medicine in the West After the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century, most works of the Greek physicians were lost to Western Europe. In the 14th and 15th centuries, however, Western Europeans began to rediscover Greek scientific and medical texts. This was due in part to the discovery of Arab repositories of learning in Spain and elsewhere during the Crusades as well as the immigration to Italy of Byzantine scholars at the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

0
♥ 1
237 reads

History of Medicine Bacterial Genetics: 1946-58 His inquisitiveness, facility for establishing connections between scientific disciplines, and grasp of institutional strategy led Joshua Lederberg to the forefront of successive advances in science: molecular genetics in the 1940s and 1950s; the search for extraterrestrial life in the 1950s and 1960s; computers and artificial intelligence in the 1960s and 1970s. His discoveries in genetics produced a deeper understanding not only of the biochemical mechanism of inheritance and mutation in microorganisms, but of the evolution of diseases, the causes of drug resistance, and the possibilities of genetic engineering and gene therapy.

0
♥ 0
236 reads

ABOUT e-ASIA The e-Asia project is funded by the University of Oregon Library through the generosity of Nissho Iwai.yella By building a collection of digitized e-books and a database of full text web resources, e-Asia strives to contribute to the research and scholarship of East Asia. While the e-Asia project is based largely on resources held at the University of Oregon Library, its purpose is neither to duplicate nor displace printed traditonal materials. Rather, by providing searchable full text, the digitalization efforts of e-Asia represent a new tool aimed at facilitating the information-gathering process.

0
♥ 0
220 reads

About Scholars' Bank Welcome to Scholars' Bank , an open-access digital repository created to capture, distribute and preserve the intellectual output of the University of Oregon. Scholars' Bank is maintained by the University of Oregon Libraries, under the coordination of Digital Library Services . Using the open-source software DSpace, available from MIT and Hewlett Packard, Scholars' Bank provides stable, long-term storage needed to house the digital products of UO faculty and researchers. If you are interested in starting a community or contributing to an existing community contact a Scholars' Bank representative at scholars@uoregon.edu .

0
♥ 1
209 reads

The Gerald W. Williams Collection In 2007 the OSU Libraries acquired the Gerald W. Williams Collection , consisting of the collected historic photographs, personal papers, and research library of Gerald "Jerry" Williams, former national historian for the U.S. Forest Service. Williams, a native Oregonian, spent much of his Forest Service career in the Pacific Northwest, prior to being appointed national historian in 1998. This digital collection includes some of the best imagery from the Williams Collection, including photos of the WWI era Spruce Production Division , logging photos of northwest Oregon taken by John Fletcher Ford , photos of Celilo Falls taken in 1956 by Jack Williams, and photos of depression era Civilian Conservation Corps camps and activities.

0
♥ 0
186 reads

About - University of Oregon. Office of the Dean of Personnel Administration. National Japanese American Student Relocation Council Records 1942-1946 The National Japanese American Student Relocation Council was created by university administrators as a means of relocating Japanese American college students to other universities and colleges away from the West coast during World War II, and to prevent these students from being interned in government-run internment camps. At the University of Oregon, Karl Onthank, Dean of Personnel Administration, represented the University in relocating UO Japanese American students. The collection includes correspondence, newsletters, speeches, minutes of meetings, and ephemera.

0
♥ 1
172 reads

Linus Pauling, an OSU alum (Oregon Agricultural College, class of 1922), was among the most decorated of American scientists. He received his first honorary doctorate from his alma mater in 1933, and in rapid succession was similarly honored by institutions including Oxford University, the University of Chicago, Princeton University, Cambridge University and the Sorbonne. By the time of his death, Pauling had been awarded forty-seven honorary doctorates. Not included in this total is the honorary diploma received in 1962 from Washington High School in Portland, Oregon.

0
♥ 0
264 reads

Introduction In 1999, inspired by the remarkable success of the Human Genome Project, the OSU Libraries Special Collections launched an ambitious undertaking that seeks to closely-document virtually every day of Linus and Ava Helen Pauling's lives. The result is Linus Pauling Day-by-Day, a constantly-expanding resource that provides in-depth description for a substantial portion of the half-million item Ava Helen and Linus Pauling Papers. This huge amount of data is presented in easy-to-use calendar form. Index pages created for each year of the Day-by-Day calendar provide an overview of the major events in the Paulings' lives, a full accounting of their travel and snapshots from their various adventures at home and abroad.

0
♥ 0
176 reads

About Oregon Maps The University of Oregon Libraries and the Oregon State University Libraries present the Oregon Maps online collection in celebration of Oregon's sesquecentennial. Whether traveling city streets and country roads, or observing forests and farms from an airplane window, the patterns of the landscape have come to resemble the maps we draw. As European settlers populated Oregon, Western traditions of cartography came as well. One hundred and fifty years later, the Jeffersonian survey grid is imprinted in everyone's mind as most of Oregon's roads and property boundaries have been drawn on top of our Public Land Survey System. Maps are not simple representations of the world.

0
♥ 0
184 reads

About the Collection In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the OSU Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in 2007 and 2008. These interviews help to tell the story of extension in Oregon during the 50 years after World War II. They cover areas including agriculture, 4-H, home economics, energy, community development, Sea Grant, communications, and administration and support. The original interviews and transcripts have been placed in the University Archives. Two additional interviews from the Archives’ collection, conducted in the 1980s and early 1990s, are also included. Interviews are available via the OSU Libraries’ streaming server. Transcripts and photographs are also available online. Interviews

0
♥ 0
239 reads

About The Oregon Daily Emerald (ODE) Archives is a full text searchable database of past ODE issues. The current collection began with issues in September 2005. At this time, there are no plans to digitize older issues of the Oregon Daily Emerald. An Oregon Daily Emerald Photograph Archives is coming soon. ODE Photographs can be purchased from ODE at http://reprints.dailyemerald.com . All material is copyrighted by Oregon Daily Emerald Publishing Co., Inc. Visit the Oregon Daily Emerald website. Last revision: 10/09/2011 1501 Kincaid Street, Eugene, OR 97403-1299 | T: (541) 346-3053 | F: (541) 346-3485

0
♥ 0
198 reads

Oregon Explorer is a comprehensive digital library of Oregon's natural resources. This state-of-the-art, Web-based resource uses advanced information technology to access and integrate data from state and federal agencies, local governments, university scientists, citizens, and K-12 educators and students. It supports informed decisions and actions by people concerned with Oregon's natural resources and environment.

Through a series of geographic, data and topic-based Web portals, Oregon Explorer helps users:

7.04
♥ 1
412 reads

FAQ Local and Regional Documents Archive About This Project The Local and Regional Documents Archive is a service of the University of Oregon Libraries. The project seeks to serve the citizens of Oregon and researchers around the world by providing a central repository and archive of significant documents produced by local governments and regional offices of United States federal government agencies within the state. Governments and agencies represented in the database include: Among the types of documents included in the archives are local planning documents, city development codes, sub-area plans, documents required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), land management planning documents, resource management plans, and environmental opinions.

0
♥ 0
164 reads