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About the Collection The C. V. Starr East Asian Library's run of Ling long women's magazine is one of the most complete outside China, acquired, we believe, in the late 1930s or early 1940s as part of a concerted effort to enlarge Columbia University's Chinese-language holdings. The collection expanded dramatically in the years between 1938 and 1941 when the holdings more than doubled, thanks to a special grant from the Rockefeller Foundation.

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The public's fascination with the human drama of the courtroom did not begin with Perry Mason or Court TV. Cases involving the relationships between men and women, within or outside the bonds of marriage, have long engaged the popular imagination. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, published accounts of sensational trials provided the public with both entertainment and cautionary tales. Studies in Scarlet presents the images of over 420 separately published trial narratives from the Harvard Law School Library's extensive trial collections.

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W ELCOME to the Hidden History of the Berkeley Campus, a project of the Gay Bears! Collection in The University Archives. This site gathers together information about the history of sexual minorities at Cal -- students, faculty, staff and visitors. It is designed as a gateway for further exploration into one aspect of the long and fascinating story of the University of California, Berkeley. You may browse the content on this site by: Dates Places People and Events Questions, comments and feedback regarding this website are welcome. Please contact us at the Gay Bears! Collection . Unless otherwise specified, all contents copyright the Regents of the University of California. Links to other sites of related interest:

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The website provides a visual record of changes in economic, social, and environmental life in the region as depicted in the evolving technology of photography. The time period covered in the website begins with the announcement in the Pittsburgh Gazette of the invention of a chemical process by Louis Daguerre. This process would later become known to the world as photography and would be used by generations of photographers to explore life and changes in Western Pennsylvania. “Life in Western Pennsylvania 1840-1970” is organized into three major categories:
1) Searchable database 2) Timeline 3) Section on preservation and identification of photographs. There are also sections on student activities, picture puzzles, e-cards, a teacher’s guide, and project documentation.

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Doukhobor Collection of Simon Fraser University About the Collection The Simon Fraser University Library Doukhobor Collection is comprised of over 700 primary source items (totaling over 3,300 images) dating from 1898 to 1975. Among these items are a variety of scanned manuscripts, photographs, books and book chapters, journals, magazine articles, financial documents and interviews. The items in the Collection largely deal with the settlement of the Doukhobors in late 19th - early 20th century Canada. This material represents a significant portion of the manuscripts and photographs but only a fraction of the books and periodicals in the Library's holdings. The collection includes items in both English and Russian.

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About The American Jewess Project Overview: The American Jewess Published between April 1895 and August 1899, The American Jewess was the first English-language publication directed to American Jewish women. Part of the emergence of new public identities for Jewish women, The American Jewess offered an evocative range of features that included demands for synagogue membership for women; health, household and fashion tips; early expressions of American Zionism; short fiction; and reflections on the propriety of women riding bicycles. The American Jewess represented the changing aspirations of America's prosperous and acculturated Jewish women.

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The Western Michigan University Libraries United States Civil War Collection was launched in 2007 with 8 diaries of men with connections to Michigan or the Midwest. In 2009 the Collection expanded to include a selection of letters by Samuel Hodgman from Climax, Michigan, who served with the 7th Michigan Infantry. The addition of the letters was made possible by a donation from the Friends of the Western Michigan University Libraries in honor of Bettina Meyer, retired Associate Dean. The current collection represents diverse military experiences, ranging from a musician to a prisoner of war. The handwritten originals have full transcriptions that are searchable with subjects.

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A London Provisioner's Chronicle, 1550–1563, by Henry Machyn: Manuscript, Transcription, and Modernization is an electronic scholarly edition created by Richard W. Bailey, Marilyn Miller, and Colette Moore. The Chronicle was one of the treasures of the library of the antiquarian Robert Cotton, and it was stored in the same bookcase with the Beowulf manuscript. Its location was in the book press surmounted by a bust of the Roman emperor Vitellius, and it takes its shelf mark in the British Library from that location: Cotton Vitellius F.v. In the terrible fire that did so much damage to this library in the early eighteenth century, the 162 leaves of the diary were badly damaged and portions of the outside margins and the top of the text were charred or burned away.

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About Groves Monographs on Marriage and Family is an edited book series, beginning in 2010, based on the annual Groves Conference on Marriage and Family , an interdisciplinary, interprofessional organization of limited invited membership founded in 1934. Groves Monographs publishes work on the leading edges of theory development and empirical research in the field of family studies. Individual volumes are edited by the chairs of the annual Groves Conferences and include peer-reviewed chapters by the conference presenters and invited authors. Topics are timely and provocative with diverse themes. Subscription Groves Monographs on Marriage and Family is an open-access resource. New issues are announced on the Groves Conference website .

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Volume 15, 2011 : Families & Transitions Michigan Family Review (MFR) is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary publication of the Michigan Council on Family Relations (MiCFR) and focuses on professional application and scholarly inquiry. Traditionally, MFR has been published once a year with each volume highlighting a single theme. MFR provides a forum for a wide range of professionals and others interested in strengthening family life. Readers and contributors include educators at many levels in several fields, social service staff, researchers, attorneys, medical and health personnel, clergy, and public policy makers, as well as practitioners in community and citizen-action groups, and family members themselves.

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About the Collection In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the OSU Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in 2007 and 2008. These interviews help to tell the story of extension in Oregon during the 50 years after World War II. They cover areas including agriculture, 4-H, home economics, energy, community development, Sea Grant, communications, and administration and support. The original interviews and transcripts have been placed in the University Archives. Two additional interviews from the Archives’ collection, conducted in the 1980s and early 1990s, are also included. Interviews are available via the OSU Libraries’ streaming server. Transcripts and photographs are also available online. Interviews

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Database selection The goal of this project is to catalog and digitize each of the 1,780 slides within the Claire Holt collection. Microsoft Excel was selected as the application most suited to cataloguing requirements. Image browser After researching options available for creating and maintaining a widely-accessible virtual collection, Luna Imaging’s In sight® browsing software was selected as the most appropriate way to present the Claire Holt images over the Internet.

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Green 'N' Growing is a resource-based research and educational web site developed by the Special Collections Research Center at the North Carolina State University Libraries. Drawing upon the rich historical records found in the University Archives, the collection provides valuable information about women, children, race relations, education, agriculture, and rural life in North Carolina during the twentieth century. Users will be able to access digital reproductions of over 10,000 items, including photographs and pages from pamphlets, reports, and other materials, that document the history of 4-H and Home Demonstration in North Carolina from the 1900s to the 1970s.

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Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President "Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President" February 12, 1998 through September 1, 1999 Garden Room, Truman Library & Museum The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum is one of thirteen Presidential Libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration . 500 W. US Hwy. 24. Independence MO 64050 truman.library@nara.gov ; Phone: 816-268-8200 or 1-800-833-1225; Fax: 816-268-8295.

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Inside the National Archives Southeast Region 1. Welcome The Southeast Region of the National Archives holds in trust original records documenting the settlement and development of a unique section of the United States. It maintains historical records from regional offices of Federal agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. These records are the documentary evidence of day-to-day occurrences that have become part of our history. This presentation highlights treasures in the region's holdings. It tells intriguing stories of the people who once inhabited this land. Some documents are about famous people and events.

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The President's Daily Diary: November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969 The secretaries outside the Oval Office prepared President Johnson's Daily Diary. Juanita Roberts, the President's personal secretary, assigned the responsibility of preparing the Diary to secretaries in the office. A particular person would "work" the Diary for a scheduled period. As visits and telephone calls occurred, the secretary "working" the Diary would note them; occasionally the secretary missed noting a call or meeting. White House staff who worked closely with the President frequently entered the Oval Office without the visit being noted in the Diary.

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What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Claude C. Matlack Collection documents the formative years of a mountain settlement school in Oneida, Kentucky, and provides a poignant look at life in the Cumberland Mountains of Clay County between 1903 and 1916. The collection also includes pictures taken in the photographer's hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, plus a few scenes from Indiana and Colorado. Claude C. Matlack (1878-1944) was an amateur photographer, working as an engineer for his family's plumbing and lighting business, when he happened to meet a trustee of Oneida Baptist Institute on a train in Eastern Kentucky.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Furnas Family Album (circa 1887 -1910) Collection consists of 365 images, most of which were captured with a 4 x 5 camera. The collection provides a unique, sentimental, and sometimes humorous view into the lives of members and friends of the Furnas family of Louisville, Kentucky, in the early 1900s. In addition to photographs of the family at their home and in rural Marion County, Indiana, it features scenes of Louisville (including local parks, buildings, monuments, and steamboats on the Ohio River) and travels west (to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, Missouri and as far as Spokane, Washington). Walton Furnas co-owned Furnas & Maddox Photographic and Stereoscopic Supplies in Louisville, Kentucky.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Newton Owen Postcard Collection represents nearly a century in the life and travels of an extended Kentucky family. The earliest cards date to the late 19th century, and while the bulk of the collection dates to the period 1900-1940, there are postcards dating to the 1980s as well. It consists of 781 cards, including travel postcards and greeting cards of many different kinds. The Newton Owen Postcard Collection consists of postcards collected by the Bayne, Foell, and Owen families. The Bayne family, consisting of Samuel and Fannie Bayne and their children, Josephine (born 1899), Samuel Junior (born 1901), and Sarah (born 1903).

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Toronto Orphanages and Day Nurseries Introduction In the early half of the nineteenth century, it was common practice for orphaned or deserted children to be bound into apprenticeships. By mid-century, adoption and institutional care began to emerge as alternatives to apprenticeship. Orphanages or children's "homes" and day nurseries provided residential care for children in need. By the 1920s, institutional care was gradually phased out and replaced by programmes of foster care, or "boarding out". Day nurseries evolved as the pre-cursor to daycare centres. Reports and Papers from Toronto's early child care agencies reflect society's evolving attitudes towards childcare and the work ethic from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s.

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Blessed with many ravines, wooded lots and parklands, early Toronto residents were able to enjoy many winter outdoor activies right in their own neighbourhoods. Sleighing, tobogganing, bobsledding, skating, curling, hockey, skiing and snowshoeing were all popular forms of winter recreation. As the city grew and prospered, clubs and associations formed, championships were organized and new facilities were built to meet the demand. Horse drawn sleighs were used to transport goods from farm to city stores in wintertime and wealthy businessmen had them in their stables. Toronto companies would occasionally decide to reward their employees by organizing group horse sleigh rides in High Park. Letter, 29 December 1883 Tobogganing became a popular sport in the late 19th century.

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Gone Fishin’ Torontonians have a long and happy tradition of heading north to cottage country during the long, hot days of summer. In the 1860s the Muskoka Club was established by a group of Toronto adventurers who led annual expeditions to the Muskoka wilderness. By the 1870s several of the members had purchased land on Lake Joseph, and the tradition of summer cottaging was born. In 1898 a group of professors and alumni from the University of Toronto joined together to purchase recreational property in Go Home Bay, on Georgian Bay, held as shares in the Madawaska Club. Many of the cottagers in Go Home are descendants of those first Madawaska Club members.

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Welcome to Local Flavour. This virtual exhibit surveys the various aspects of eating in Toronto over a span of 125 years. To turn the pages of Toronto's, click your mouse near the edge of the page to the right and then drag the mouse across to turn page. Or use the 'Next page' and 'Previous page' buttons at the top to flip through pages. You can also use the 'Go to page...' dropdown menu to quickly jump to any section of the exhibit.

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About Lewiston Orchards Life Lewiston Orchards Life was a neighborhood newsletter published in Lewiston, Idaho during the early 1900s that covered the horticultural and residential events of those living in Lewiston Orchards. Special Collection & Archives at the University of Idaho Library holds fourteen issues as part of their Day Northwest Collection. About Lewiston Orchards Now a residential neighborhood in Lewiston, Idaho, Lewiston Orchards was once a vast commercial garden. The area produced apples, apricots, cherries, berries, plums, pears, quinces, peaches, nuts, lettuce, and grapes in abundance. The ???Orchards??? grew out of an ambitious land development and irrigation project, which was conceived and undertaken by Harry L. Powers at the turn of the 20th century.

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Get to know the people behind the names. Here are some details on specific historical records: U.S. Census Records Learn if ancestors owned homes or were born in other countries. You could get details about their ages, places of birth, ethnic backgrounds, marriages, children, occupations — even the value of their personal estates. U.S. Military Records Find your family’s military heroes from the Revolution- ary War through Vietnam. See enlistment dates, learn about famous battles, locate veteran gravesites and discover personal details like a physical description, signature and more. U.S. Immigration Records Discover your ancestral homeland and recreate family journeys across oceans.

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