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About - University of Oregon. Office of the Dean of Personnel Administration. National Japanese American Student Relocation Council Records 1942-1946 The National Japanese American Student Relocation Council was created by university administrators as a means of relocating Japanese American college students to other universities and colleges away from the West coast during World War II, and to prevent these students from being interned in government-run internment camps. At the University of Oregon, Karl Onthank, Dean of Personnel Administration, represented the University in relocating UO Japanese American students. The collection includes correspondence, newsletters, speeches, minutes of meetings, and ephemera.

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About This Collection The Hay Library’s famed collection of manuscripts authored or signed by Lincoln, now comprising nearly 1,100 pieces in all, represents the accumulation of many years of active collecting by private individuals and Friends of the Brown University Library. These materials came to the Library in a number of ways. The original core of the collection included 134 manuscripts by Lincoln and another 183 by close associates of Lincoln. These materials came to the Library in 1923 as part of the Lincoln collection compiled by Charles Woodbury McLellan, one of the five great Lincoln collectors in the early 20th century. Since then, manuscripts have been added both by gift and by purchase. The first major addition to the collection was made by John D.

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Just as programs are sold at sporting events today, broadsides -- styled at the time as "Last Dying Speeches" or "Bloody Murders" -- were sold to the audiences that gathered to witness public executions in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Britain. These ephemeral publications were intended for the middle or lower classes, and most sold for a penny or less. Published in British towns and cities by printers who specialized in this type of street literature, a typical example features an illustration (usually of the criminal, the crime scene, or the execution); an account of the crime and (sometimes) the trial; and the purported confession of the criminal, often cautioning the reader in doggerel verse to avoid the fate awaiting the perpetrator.

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