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Category: Text, Yale University

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This collection draws together images from The Medieval Book, the catalogue of an exhibition held at the Beinecke Library in 1988 and curated by Vice-Provost Barbara Shailor. A celebration of the Beinecke Library?s extraordinary collection of medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, the exhibition examined the development, construction, and function of the book in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The manuscript collections have been described extensively in the Catalogue of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University , volumes 1-3 of which were edited by Barbara Shailor, and volume 4 of which was edited by Robert Babcock, Lisa Davis, and Philip Rusche.

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345 reads

The Beinecke Library digitized 10,705 slides taken from a microfilm of F. T. Marinetti's seven Libroni or scrapbooks, compiled by Marinetti between 1905 and 1944, the year of his death. These scrapbooks contain thousands of newspaper clippings, journal articles, cartoons, drawings, photographs, manuscript items and other printed ephemera, which document Futurism and the avant-garde. The slides were acquired by the Library in 1999, along with a detailed listing of virtually every item depicted. That detailed listing is the source of the bibliographic data currently linked to each image. The Libroni database contains bibliographic errors, items lacking description, and image legibility and sequencing problems.

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445 reads

The Collection Cite as: Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Papers. General Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University Related: Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's Libroni 10,705 slides taken from a microfilm of F. T. Marinetti's seven Libroni or scrapbooks, compiled by Marinetti between 1905 and 1944, the year of his death. Share |

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975 reads

A writer, social activist, and arts aficionado, Mabel Dodge Luhan is celebrated less for her artistic accomplishments than for her key role in building artistic communities, supporting artists, and generating interest in modern art forms. A Buffalo, New York, native, she lived at the turn of the twentieth century in Florence, Italy, where she was a prominent figure among American expatriates and visitors that included Gertrude Stein, Carl Van Vechten, and Hutchins and Neith Boyce Hapgood. Returning to the United States in the 1910s, Mabel Dodge settled in Greenwich Village, where she helped organize the groundbreaking Armory show of Postimpressionist art and hosted perhaps the most important New York City salon of the period.

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For the last decade of the nineteenth century and at least the first two decades of the twentieth, Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) was one of the most popular writers in the English language, in both prose and verse. He was among the last British poets to command a mass audience, appealing to readers of all social classes and ages. Although his few novels, except Kim , were only a mixed success, in the medium of the short story Kipling extended the range of English fiction in both subject matter and technique and perhaps did more than any other author in the English language to blur the division between popular and high art. Rudyard Kipling: The Books I Leave Behind , an exhibition held in 2007, was the first comprehensive show to be presented anywhere in over fifty years.

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[Autographed letter signed] 1905 July 12, Wyncote, Pennsylvania [from] Ezra Pound These materials may be under copyright. To learn more, contact the Curator, Yale Collection of American Literature. Call Number: YCAL MSS 175 Related Collections Ezra Pound Papers, YCAL MSS 43 William Carlos Williams papers, YCAL MSS 116 H. D. Papers, YCAL MSS 24 Bryher papers, GEN MSS 97

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421 reads

From the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries, the royal and aristocratic courts behind Europe’s most illustrious festivals printed elaborate, illustrated volumes to record the celebrations that they organized to mark births, deaths, betrothals, weddings, coronations, and visits. Often circulated for the benefit of rival noble families and in the interests of self promotion, festival books are fascinating witnesses to aristocratic culture and art during the Early Modern period.

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258 reads

was adapted into a Hollywood film starring Audrey Hepburn in 1959. Though she was best known during her lifetime for this remarkably successful book, Hulme was more than a one-novel writer; she was the author of nine well-received books of fiction and nonfiction, some of which earned national awards and recognition. For a time, Hulme considered writing her own autobiography.

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Gift of Langston Hughes and bequest of the estate of Langston Hughes, ca. 1940-67. These materials may be under copyright. Permission from the Langston Hughes Estate is required to publish materials by Langston Hughes in any format. Contact information for the Estate may be found in the WATCH File . To learn more, contact the appropriate curator. Call Number: JWJ MSS 26

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The H.D. Papers are the bequest of Norman Holmes Pearson, H.D.'s literary executor. Most of the material in the H. D. Papers came to the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library after Professor Pearson's death in 1973. Prior to this time, selected groups of materials were given to the library by Professor Pearson and were placed with related documents in other collections; these materials have been retrieved and placed in the H.D. Papers. Materials from other sources are also found in the papers, with specific provenance information on the appropriate folders. Permission from the H.D. Estate is required to publish H.D. materials in any format. To learn more, contact the Curator, Yale Collection of American Literature. Call Number: YCAL MSS 24

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327 reads

Witold Gombrowicz (1904-1969), was a Polish novelist and playwright. His novels and plays include Ferdydurke (1937), Trans-Atlantyk (1953), Ślub (1953), Kosmos (1965), and Pornografia (1966). Considered one of Poland's foremost literary figures of the twentieth century, Gombrowicz's novels and plays have been translated into many languages. The Collection The archive consists of correspondence, writings, personal papers, photographs, audiovisual material and memorabilia documenting Gombrowicz’s life and literary activity chiefly during the last two decades of his life (1949-69). Currently, only a portion of the Archive is available online.

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367 reads

In the autumn of 1609, the Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei turned his telescope to the heavens, deciphering the cratered face of the moon, the four satellites of Jupiter, and other previously opaque features of the heavens. When, in 1610, Galileo published his Sidereus Nuncius, or Starry Messenger, the German astronomer Johannes Kepler responded with enthusiasm, praising the significance of Galileo’s observations with his own Dissertatio cum Nuncio Sidereo, or, Conversations with the Starry Messenger (1610). To whom else did the stars speak in the early modern period?

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356 reads

1 July 1944 Richard Wright (1908-1960) is perhaps best known for his critically-acclaimed collection Uncle Tom’s Children: Four Novellas (1938), his groundbreaking novel Native Son (1940) and his autobiography, first published as Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth (1945). Black Boy was the on the bestseller list from April 29 to June 6 of that year, despite being denounced as obscene in the U.S. Senate by Democrat Theodore Bilbo of Mississippi, and it solidified Wright’s reputation, at the time, as the most famous black author in America.

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1,214 read

Jonathan Edwards, among the foremost theologians and philosophers of his time, was born in East Windsor, Connecticut, on October 5, 1703. He attended Yale College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1720. Upon leaving Yale, he succeeded his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard, as minister of the Congregationalist Church at Northampton, Massachusetts from 1726 to 1750. There he became known as an evangelical preacher and stern Calvinist, helping inspire the "Great Awakening" of the 1740s. His writings, which were widely circulated, included A Faithful Narrative and Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. In 1751 he became a missionary to the Mahican and Mohawk Indians at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and minister to the English congregation there.

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These two volumes from the Beinecke's collections were digitized to coincide with The Great Mirror of Folly: Finance, Culture, and the Bubbles of 1720 , a symposium co-sponsored by the Yale School of Management International Center for Finance , held at Yale University in April 2008. The starting point for this conference was an extraordinary volume likely published in 1720, The Great Mirror of Folly (or, in the original Dutch, Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid ). Early versions of this folio were published in Amsterdam within months of the 1720 economic crashes that roiled the stock markets of England, France, and the Dutch Provinces.

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Katherine S. Dreier Papers / Société Anonyme Archive Artist and collector Katherine Dreier joined Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray to found the Société Anonyme, an organization designed to support and generate awareness of modernist art; the group’s name, a French phrase meaning “incorporated,” highlighted the fact that the organization was not allied with any particular artistic school. The Société Anonyme promoted new artists by arranging exhibitions to introduce audiences to their work and develop their reputations among galleries and collectors. Critics praised the Société Anonyme for its commitment to new artists and its inclusion of their work in exhibits and catalogs. Dreier played an essential role in generating American interest in and acceptance of modern art.

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About the Crawl Space The poems in Crawl Space were composed using a typewriter, working on commercial paint sample cards; each card is an example of a different shade of white interior house paint. The tools of composition provided useful constraints and suggestions, which are evident in both the form and content of the poems-a meditation on walls, both real and metaphorical, in marriage and the trappings of domesticity. I drafted versions of each of the poems (necessitating frequent trips to Home Depot to replenish paint card supplies) and eventually made a few complete sets, one of which is housed in the Yale Collection of American Literature at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.

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388 reads

The Volume Childrens talk, English & Latin : divided into several clauses : wherein the propriety of both languages is kept : that children by the help of their mother-tongue, may more easily learn to discourse in good Latine amongst themselves : there are also numbers set down betwixt both, which do shew the place and natural use of any word or phrase , by Charles Hoole, Master of Arts, L.C. Oxon, teacher of a private grammar-school betwixt Goldsmiths-Alley in Redcross-street, and Maidenhead Court in Aldersgate-street, London.

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The Most Peculiar History of the Chewing Gum Man, Gelett Burgess (1866-1951), San Francisco, California, 1894 November. About the Author Gelett Burgess was a very prolific author, writing rhymes and stories, drawing pictures, teaching art, and editing a famous humor magazine, The Lark . Among his best-known creations are The Goops, round little creatures he used to demonstrate good and bad behavior. Burgess made a few special books for his friends and family. The ?Chewing Gum Man? was made for his sisters. This story was eventually published in The Burgess Nonsense Book in 1901.

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The author and dramatist J. M. Barrie (1860-1937) created this adventure story in 1901 for the Llewelyn Davies family, in particular, four of the five Llewelyn Davies children, George (1893-1915), John, known as "Jack" (1894-1959), Peter (1897-1960), and Michael (1900-1921). Barrie befriended the Llewelyn Davies family in the 1890s and his famous character "Peter Pan" was inspired by the children. This novel, titled, The boy castaways of Black Lake Island, being a record of the terrible adventures of the brothers Davies in the Summer of 1901, faithfully set forth by Peter Llewelyn Davies , includes thirty-five mounted photographs with typeset captions and a preface by Peter.

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Rachel Louise Carson, noted biologist and environmentalist who fascinated readers with three books on the wonders of the sea and awakened the American public to the dangers of pesticide misuse with a highly controversial bestseller, was born on May 27, 1907, in Springdale, Pennsylvania. She was interested in writing at an early age and submitted a number of juvenile stories, poems, and essays to leading youth magazines. Rachel Carson's first book, Under the Sea Wind , attracted little notice on its appearance in 1941. However, her second book on the sea, The Sea Around Us (1951), remained on the best-seller lists for eighty-six weeks, was eventually translated into thirty languages, and received many awards.

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419 reads