▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to refine your current search.

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

: all » Politics

City

Country

Province Or State

More options
[×]

Subject

: Arts & Humanities
[×]

Social Tags

: Politics

Category: Arts & Humanities, Politics

15 results

Results

The Marxists Internet Archive (MIA, http://www.marxists.org/) is an all-volunteer, non-profit public library, started more than 20 years ago in 1990. In 2006, MIA averaged 1.1 million visitors per month, downloading 15.5 million files per month. This represents a 25% increase in visitors since 2005, and a 380% increase in visitors since 2000.

0
♥ 2
385 reads

Bodleian Library, Oxford Dec 2007 - Apr 2008 Introduction John Milton was born 400 years ago, and his ideas about citizenship are still relevant to us today. The author of the greatest epic poem in English, Paradise Lost , was also a reforming prose writer, a member of a revolutionary government, and the victim of censorship, whose daring positions we now consider vital to modern governance. Advocate of freedom of the press, transparency in government, public debate, education for liberty, the right to divorce, the disestablishment of the church and the abolition of monarchy, Milton espoused positions radical even by today's standards.

0
♥ 0
292 reads

What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

0
♥ 0
372 reads

The National Archives and Records Administration Clifford K. Berryman: Political Cartoonist Extraordinaire In 1886 at the age of 17, Clifford K. Berryman moved from Kentucky to Washington, DC, to work at the U.S. Patent Office, where he used his self-taught talents to draw patent illustrations. He left the Patent Office in 1891 to become a cartoonist’s understudy for the Washington Post. Within five years, Berryman was chief cartoonist, a position he held until 1907 when he became the front-page cartoonist at the Washington Evening Star. Berryman drew political cartoons for the Star until his death in 1949 at the age of 80. Washington political circles embraced Berryman’s cartooning.

0
♥ 0
343 reads

The President's Daily Diary: November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969 The secretaries outside the Oval Office prepared President Johnson's Daily Diary. Juanita Roberts, the President's personal secretary, assigned the responsibility of preparing the Diary to secretaries in the office. A particular person would "work" the Diary for a scheduled period. As visits and telephone calls occurred, the secretary "working" the Diary would note them; occasionally the secretary missed noting a call or meeting. White House staff who worked closely with the President frequently entered the Oval Office without the visit being noted in the Diary.

0
♥ 0
284 reads

Guns, tanks, and bombs were the principal weapons of World War II, but there were other, more subtle forms of warfare as well. Words, posters, and films waged a constant battle for the hearts and minds of the American citizenry just as surely as military weapons engaged the enemy. Persuading the American public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. The Government launched an aggressive propaganda campaign with clearly articulated goals and strategies to galvanize public support, and it recruited some of the nation's foremost intellectuals, artists, and filmmakers to wage the war on that front.

0
♥ 2
339 reads

Federal Designs: Symbolism Symbols are an important part of America`s design heritage. They establish and reinforce the national identity and patriotism. In some cases, American symbols are based on recognized associations. The ideals of Greek democracy, the power of Imperial Rome, or the refinements of European fashion frequently are reflected in Federal designs. At other times and for other purposes, designers created icons using images unique to this new country, to this new form of government, and to America`s aspirations to world power.

0
♥ 0
309 reads

Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President "Dear Bess: Love Letters from the President" February 12, 1998 through September 1, 1999 Garden Room, Truman Library & Museum The Harry S. Truman Library and Museum is one of thirteen Presidential Libraries administered by the National Archives and Records Administration . 500 W. US Hwy. 24. Independence MO 64050 truman.library@nara.gov ; Phone: 816-268-8200 or 1-800-833-1225; Fax: 816-268-8295.

0
♥ 0
301 reads

During the depths of the Great Depression of the 1930s and into the early years of World War II, the Federal government supported the arts in unprecedented ways. For 11 years, between 1933 and 1943, federal tax dollars employed artists, musicians, actors, writers, photographers, and dancers. Never before or since has our government so extensively sponsored the arts. MORE... This link is not functional because your browser does not support JavaScript or Javascript has been disabled. Please use this link to MORE...

0
♥ 0
256 reads

Cornell Modern Indonesia Collection Professor George Kahin's introduction to the first "Interim Report" describes the concerns and intentions of CMIP's editors. Prof. Kahin noted that, "With respect to much of the research carried out in post-revolutionary Indonesia, there has been a lag of two to three or more years between the termination of field work and the first publication describing the results of this work" and " ... the delay has been particularly regrettable inasmuch as the extent of research [on Indonesia] being undertaken is so limited." For this reason, the editors proposed to invite researchers to make their findings available in a provisional form, as CMIP "Interim Reports," or working papers, before the publication of their finished books.

0
♥ 1
333 reads

African Political Ephemera and Realia Project Search Browse The African Political Ephemera and Realia Project is an online collection of ephemeral material - pamphlets, t-shirts, cloths, posters, to name just a few examples - that documents the material culture of politics in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ephemeral political material often does not find its way into institutional collections either because the material is discarded before it draws the attention of collectors, because it is too popular and mass-produced to merit consideration as art, or because it does not fit easily (either physically or intellectually) into the book- and manuscript-based realm of libraries.

0
♥ 0
293 reads

A project of the Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection Box A Brown University Library Providence, RI 02912 Tel.: (401) 863-2414 ASKB@Brown.edu Developed & hosted by Center for Digital Initiatives Box A Brown University Library Providence, RI 02912 cdi@brown.edu The Collection The Napoleonic satires housed in the Anne S. K. Brown Military collection of the John Hay Library represent several important gifts made to the library in the 20th century. In addition to the Napoleonic satires located in the military collection bequeathed by Ms. Brown, Paul Revere Bullard (Class of 1897) and William H. Hoffman contributed a variety of significant objects with a Napoleonic theme.

0
♥ 1
352 reads

About This Collection This database comprises sheet music from the McLellan Lincoln Collection at the John Hay Library and includes material written between 1859 and 1923. Music written about Lincoln ranges from popular song to compositions for orchestral performance. Although the focus is on Abraham Lincoln, these pieces offer an important resource for understanding the popular context of Lincoln’s life and presidency and, later, the significance of his legacy in American life. Between 1859 and 1865, popular music about Abraham Lincoln proliferated. Much more than simply suggesting 19th century musical fashions, Lincoln songs are an important source for understanding popular attitudes towards the Illinois candidate, later the 16th President, and his policy agenda.

8
♥ 0
1,075 read

About Women’s Voices is a collection of vividly expressed reminiscences of the earliest women students admitted to the University of Michigan. The quotations were selected from responses to a survey sent in 1924 to all alumnae who had attended the University of Michigan. The more than 3,000 women who responded were among the first in the nation to experience higher education in a coeducational environment, and reported experiences that occurred over 54 years on the campus of the University of Michigan. The responses to the survey were highly individualistic. The alumnae had come to the University from different geographical areas and different backgrounds, and they went from the University into many different fields of endeavor.

0
♥ 0
201 reads

Proceedings of the 25th International Congress of Papyrology The 25th International Congress of Papyrology took place at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor from July 29 to August 4, 2007. This was the second time that the Congress convened in Ann Arbor (following the 12th Congress in 1968) and the third in North America (the 16th Congress in 1980 met in New York). Of the approximately 150 papers delivered during the Congress, 80 fully-referreed articles are included in this publication. This is the first time the Proceedings of the International Congress of Papyrology has been published primarily as an online edition. Individual articles are freely available to search, browse, and download.

0
♥ 0
254 reads