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: Science & Technology

Category: Science & Technology

Results 22 - 42 of 121

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A digital collection comprised of historical photograhs and documents pertaining to the history of the Dworshak Dam, selected primarily from the collection of A. B. Curtis, former mayor of Orofino, Idaho. The images and documents span the years 1952 to 1972, documenting both the legislative history that led to the dam's construction and the construction itself. To explore the collection by date or location, or to find out more about the collection, use the tabs above. Questions? questions? Contact Devin: dbecker@uidaho.edu (208) 885-7040 The Dworshak Dam Collection is a collection that is still under development.

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171 reads

The Columbia River Basin Project Begun with the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1933, the Columbia River Basin Project is one of the largest, and most contentious, engineering projects ever completed in the American West. Franklin Roosevelt originally authorized the construction of the dam with the intention of diverting huge portions of the Columbia River to the fertile, though arid, Washington State Interior.??With the outbreak of World War II, however, irrigation initiatives were put on hold, and hydroelectric power became the dam's primary function. This change in use proved important historically.

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139 reads

Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin Number 1, September 1892 About the Collection The History The diffusion of useful and practical, research-based information on agriculture and related subjects has been a primary responsibility of the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and University of Idaho Extension since their beginnings. The University of Idaho Board of Regents established the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station at the UI in 1892 following passage of the federal Hatch Act (1887), which provided for the creation of agricultural experiment stations at state land-grant colleges.

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208 reads

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) has long been committed to an active exhibition program for its Local History and Special Collections in the Canada Trust Gallery at the Toronto Reference Library and other Library venues. The virtual version of All Aboard Toronto ? Railways and the Growth of a City , fully re-creates the exhibition on display in our Gallery from August 4 ? October 7, 2001. The exhibition explores Toronto railway history and its impact on the development of the city from the 1850s to the end of the steam era in the mid 20th century. It is illustrated with over a hundred collection items including paintings, drawings, maps, postcards, broadsides and other ephemera.

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236 reads

Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, address to the Senate, September 10, 1939. In September 1939, Canadians prepared for another war with memories of the Great War still fresh in their minds. It was determined that Canada’s war effort would be concentrated in financial and industrial support, and the first priority would be to secure the nation’s borders. By the spring of 1940, the progress of the war in Europe had changed dramatically. With the German invasion of Denmark, Norway, Belgium and Holland, and the fall of France, Canadians reassessed their own vulnerability. The spectre of a German victory became real.

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265 reads

Whether they are in the circus or the zoo, in the field, the stream or the air, on a dinner plate or an altar, animals have fascinated humanity from its earliest origins. Selected from Toronto Public Library’s rare books, original art and postcard collections, this survey features prints from Audubon’s Quadrupeds , images of wild and domestic animals as well as animals at play. Yes, animals are allowed in the library-roaming through thousands of pages, over hundreds of years.

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453 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Howard Steamboat Museum Collection About the Collection The Howard Steamboat Museum in Jeffersonville, Indiana, is dedicated to preserving the history of Howard Shipyards and three generations of the Howard family that owned and operated the largest inland shipbuilding site in America for over 100 years (1834-1942). The museum also fosters appreciation of the development of steamboats and inland river commerce during the same period. The museum’s photograph collection, which is housed in the University of Louisville Photographic Archives, consists primarily of images captured by Captain James E. Howard (1875-1956) between 1888 and 1934.

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327 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS Biography Orlando Metcalfe Poe was born on the family farm in Navarre, Ohio on March 7, 1832. He attended several public schools and two years in Canton Academy in Canton, Ohio before ultimately attaining his dream – attending the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York. Poe excelled particularly in mathematics and graduated sixth in his class of 1856. After graduation, Poe sought to put his engineering skills to work for the military. He moved to Detroit to join the Topographical Engineers. Wartime duties for topographical engineers included surveying positions of the army and its enemy, sketching routes of the enemy and preparing maps of battlefields. In peacetime, they surveyed and charted the nation’s rivers and lakes.

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189 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection This collection contains 210 selected digital images and 3 digital videos from an archived community collection devoted to documenting one of the worst floods in Louisville's history. On the morning of August 4, 2009, record-breaking rains fell in central Louisville and surrounding counties between 7 am and 10 am EDT, with reported hourly rainfall rates as high as 8.83 inches. The Louisville Free Public Library's main branch and the University of Louisville's Belknap and Health Sciences campuses were particularly hard hit by the deluge.

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205 reads

Walter Tennyson Swingle Walter Tennyson Swingle (1871 - 1952) was a renowned botantist and one of the twentieth century's foremost authorities on citrus plants. In 1943, after 50 years of service to the United States Department of Agriculture, he was given a position on the faculty of the University of Miami by President Bowman F. Ashe who was impressed with Swingle?s vision of tropical botany. Swingle was given the title Consultant of Tropical Botany and set up the Plant Research Laboratory in the old Botany building in Coral Gables. At UM, Swingle completed his monograph "The Botany of Citrus and its Relatives of the Orange Subfamily" which remains the premier reference for the taxonomy, morphology, and anatomy of these plants.

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190 reads

Organized in 1925, the Coral Gables Garden Club has promoted gardening and community beautification in Coral Gables for over 80 years. In recent years, the club helped preserve George Merrick's vision for his city, raising funds for new entrances to Coral Gables at Douglas and Red roads and Miracle Mile; commissioning a statue of Merrick recently dedicated in front of Coral Gables city hall; and supporting the preservation of the George Merrick house on Coral Way.

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216 reads

Henry Flagler, founder and president of the Florida East Coast Railroad (FECR), created the Model Land Company (MLC) in 1896 to manage his rapidly expanding real estate holdings in the state of Florida. The growth and expansion of the FECR was crucial to the development of Florida, and the Model Land Company, with its three subsidiary companies - Fort Dallas Land Company (FDLC), Perrine Grant Land Company (PGLC) and the Chuluota Land Company (CLC)- managed Flagler's "land empire" until its demise in 1967. The Model Land Company Records constitute a large portion of the surviving records of the Model Land Company. The files consist of the administrative and financial records of the MLC's Miami-based land agent, Frederick S.

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314 reads

About Wayman Crow The youngest in a family of twelve children, Wayman Crow was born in Hartford, Kentucky, on March 7, 1808. Crow first entered the dry goods business in 1820, when he began a five-year apprenticeship in a general dry goods store in Kentucky. By 1828, he was operating his own dry goods store, and he moved to St. Louis in 1835. In partnership with his cousin, Joshua Tevis of Philadelphia, he established the wholesale dry goods house of Crow & Tevis. In later years, the business would be known as Crow, McCreery & Company Crow, Hargadine & Company, and Hargadine-McKittrick Dry Goods Company. In 1840, Crow was elected to the Missouri state senate, on the Whig ticket. He was elected to a second term in the senate in 1850.

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276 reads

What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

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245 reads

Chrysler Cars Information Although both cars have been in the Truman Library collection for years, they had lost much of their original historical integrity, having passed through a series of other owners once the Trumans moved into the White House in 1945. For the past two years, a team of restorers has worked meticulously documenting the existing condition of the cars and establishing a restoration plan. Detailed production records from the Chrysler archives were consulted to determine paint colors and options which were originally included on the cars.

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199 reads

Guns, tanks, and bombs were the principal weapons of World War II, but there were other, more subtle forms of warfare as well. Words, posters, and films waged a constant battle for the hearts and minds of the American citizenry just as surely as military weapons engaged the enemy. Persuading the American public became a wartime industry, almost as important as the manufacturing of bullets and planes. The Government launched an aggressive propaganda campaign with clearly articulated goals and strategies to galvanize public support, and it recruited some of the nation's foremost intellectuals, artists, and filmmakers to wage the war on that front.

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276 reads

This exhibit highlights the contributions of the thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during World War II. Documents from the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis form the core of the exhibit. For those who lived through the Second World War, this exhibit may help them recall their experiences. For those who did not, it is hoped they will gain a deeper understanding of the sacrifice and commitment of those Americans who, after almost four years, were "A People at War."

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233 reads

National Archives and Records Administraton Eyewitness American Originals from the National Archives Introduction Out of the stacks and vaults of the National Archives comes this selection of eyewitness accounts. They are vivid and intensely personal, transporting us to a deeper understanding of the events described.

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213 reads

The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire "There is practically nothing left..." “At 5:13 o’clock A.M. of this 18th day of April 1906 San Francisco and vicinity was visited with a most violent earthquake shock.” The clerk of the U.S. District Court of San Francisco wrote these words in the court minute book, explaining why court was adjourned that day. His note describes one of the most devastating natural disasters in the history of the United States.

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216 reads

  W E L C O M E Living off the Land is a digital resource that features original images and other documents relating to North Carolina's agricultural history and economy. The project highlights some of the rich, educational resources available in North Carolina State University Libraries Special Collections Research Center (SCRC). Among the topics included in this collection are education, history, economics, culture, entomology, cultivation, tobacco, and crop science. For a complete list, see our subject browse . The SCRC manuscript collections that serve as the foundation for this project include the papers of individuals and organizations that have made contributions to agricultural science.

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270 reads

For most of the material from which the following new
species of Cicadidae are described, I have to thank Mr. F. P.
Dodd (queensland) and Mr. H. Elgner, of the same State.
Amongst them it will be noticed is a new species of Cyclochila
from Queensland, and also a species of Prasia, a genus so far
unrecorded in Australia, though common in New Guinea. I
have had some difficulty in deciding upon the generic deter-
mination of Psaltoda pulchra, as it has strong affinities with
Thopha in the structure of the head and the proportions of the
tegmina and wings. The abdomen, however, is unadorned with
the sacs which hide the tympana in the division Thopharia,
so I have placed the species tentatively in the genus Psaltoda.

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250 reads