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: Agriculture

Category: Agriculture

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Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin Number 1, September 1892 About the Collection The History The diffusion of useful and practical, research-based information on agriculture and related subjects has been a primary responsibility of the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and University of Idaho Extension since their beginnings. The University of Idaho Board of Regents established the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station at the UI in 1892 following passage of the federal Hatch Act (1887), which provided for the creation of agricultural experiment stations at state land-grant colleges.

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166 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About Stereographs A stereograph, also known as a stereogram or stereo view, is a double photograph that appears three-dimensional when viewed through a stereoscope. Scientist Charles Wheatstone invented a reflecting stereoscope in 1838 as a laboratory instrument. Some photographers did use this instrument to exhibit photographs, but it was not until the development of the lenticular stereoscope in 1850 by Sir William Brewster that stereographs became popular. They reached their height of popularity between 1870 and 1890 but continued to be created until as late as 1940. The term "stereograph" is said to have originated with Oliver Wendell Holmes who, in addition to being an author, poet, physician, and lecturer, invented a hand stereoscope in 1859.

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DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection Arthur Younger Ford was born in 1861 in Parkville, Missouri and raised in Owensboro, Kentucky. He graduated from Brown University in 1884 and served as the chairman of the University of Louisville Board of Trustees (1914-1921) and first full-time president of the University of Louisville (from 1921 until his death in 1926). Among Ford's accomplishments as president were acquiring Belknap Campus and securing the Louisville City Hospital as a teaching clinic for the Medical Department.

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Home View Collection Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Bringing Laxton to life A 17th-century survey and map of Laxton, Nottinghamshire.

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157 reads

What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

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154 reads

  W E L C O M E Living off the Land is a digital resource that features original images and other documents relating to North Carolina's agricultural history and economy. The project highlights some of the rich, educational resources available in North Carolina State University Libraries Special Collections Research Center (SCRC). Among the topics included in this collection are education, history, economics, culture, entomology, cultivation, tobacco, and crop science. For a complete list, see our subject browse . The SCRC manuscript collections that serve as the foundation for this project include the papers of individuals and organizations that have made contributions to agricultural science.

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208 reads

Green 'N' Growing is a resource-based research and educational web site developed by the Special Collections Research Center at the North Carolina State University Libraries. Drawing upon the rich historical records found in the University Archives, the collection provides valuable information about women, children, race relations, education, agriculture, and rural life in North Carolina during the twentieth century. Users will be able to access digital reproductions of over 10,000 items, including photographs and pages from pamphlets, reports, and other materials, that document the history of 4-H and Home Demonstration in North Carolina from the 1900s to the 1970s.

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156 reads

The USDA Economics, Statistics and Market Information System (ESMIS) is a collaborative project between Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University and several agencies of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
The system contains nearly 2500 reports and datasets. These materials cover U.S. and international agriculture and related topics. Available titles include both current and historical data. Many of the current titles are available via email subscription.
Using the navigational panel which appears on the left side of every page on this system you may search for titles, browse all of the titles from an agency, or browse for titles by subject. The help link in the navigation bar may be used to obtain help from any page.

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About This Collection In 1925, a Cornell professor of apiculture named Everett Franklin Phillips set out to create a major repository of literature on bees and beekeeping. He envisioned this library as an "accessible storehouse of our knowledge of bees and beekeeping." By 1926, Phillips had persuaded over 223 people from twenty-nine states and twenty-six foreign countries to donate thousands of books and pamphlets, and the E.F. Phillips Beekeeping Collection at Cornell was born. Perhaps Phillips' biggest coup was his ingenious plan for raising the money necessary for creating the library's endowment: he convinced hundreds of New York state beekeepers to set aside one of their hives for the library.

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CUGIR: Cornell University Geospatial Information Repository About the Cornell University Geospatial Information Repository (CUGIR) CUGIR is an active online data and metadata repository and a participating node in the National Spatial Data Infrastructure program. CUGIR provides open and free access to geospatial data and metadata for New York State, with special emphasis on natural features relevant to agriculture, ecology, natural resources, and human-environment interactions. Subjects such as landforms and topography, soils, hydrology, environmental hazards, agricultural activities, wildlife and natural resource management are appropriate for inclusion in the CUGIR catalog.

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204 reads

The story of American agriculture is captured in a broad band of documentary resources ranging from the memoirs and transactions of early agriculture societies to newspapers and almanacs; family, community, and corporate archives; and state and county extension service publications. The evolution of farm and rural life and agricultural economy is chronicled in the agriculture periodical press and the numerous local, regional, and national farm journals that exhorted, informed, and shaped the opinions, values, and concerns of early farm families. Journals such as Country Life in America , Cappers' Farmer , and Farm and Family have much to tell historians about the daily activities, issues, and practices of the time.

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About the Collection In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the OSU Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in 2007 and 2008. These interviews help to tell the story of extension in Oregon during the 50 years after World War II. They cover areas including agriculture, 4-H, home economics, energy, community development, Sea Grant, communications, and administration and support. The original interviews and transcripts have been placed in the University Archives. Two additional interviews from the Archives’ collection, conducted in the 1980s and early 1990s, are also included. Interviews are available via the OSU Libraries’ streaming server. Transcripts and photographs are also available online. Interviews

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The Collection The 102 photographs in this collection document the activities of Oregon's Bracero workers - their cultivation and harvesting work in the fields and orchards as well as the farm labor camps in which they lived. Most of the photographs were taken by Oregon State College Extension staff members as part of a larger effort to document the various groups that contributed to alleviate the state's severe shortage of farm labor. Extension photographers included John Burtner, Fred Shideler, Robert Fowler, and Harry Whitten.

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The Organic Agriculture Information Access is an electronic collection of historic United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) publications related to organic agriculture. In this collection, there are almost 200 documents published before 1942 (before synthetic chemicals became widely used) that contain state-of-the-art information and data that is still very pertinent for today's agriculture. Access to this data is intended to provide growers with new ideas on crop production without chemicals, as well as help researchers conserve scarce resources by avoiding unintended duplication.

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109 reads