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Category: History & Historiography, Manuscripts

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Thomas Jefferson (1742-1826) was the primary author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), Governor of Virginia (1779-1781), the first Secretary of State (1790-1793), second Vice-President of the United Sates (1797-1801), the third President of the United States (1801-1809), the founder of the University of Virginia (1819), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers. Four letters from the University of Miami Thomas Jefferson collection have been digitized and are available online. A full description and listing of all materials in this collection are available in the Thomas Jefferson (ASM0569) Collection Finding Aid

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Theodore Bolton Collection Theodore Bolton was a librarian, art historian, and artist. Bolton received a diploma in the arts from that Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, in 1915. He studied library science at the same institute, receiving a diploma in that subject in 1924. He pursued formal academic work later in his life as well, receiving in 1937 a B.S. in education, and a M.A. in education in 1940, both from New York University. Thereafter, he received an M.F.A. from Columbia in 1955. In addition, he studied at Harvard during the summers from 1937 to 1939. Upon his retirement, Bolton and his wife moved to Coconut Grove, Florida. Theodore Bolton died at his Coconut Grove home on Friday, December 7, 1973.

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Home Greek Collection Digitised images from The Bodleian Libraries Special Collections Bodleian Library Search: Greek Manuscripts at Oxford Browse the collection online.

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In 1761, fifteen years before the United States of America burst onto the world stage with the Declaration of Independence, the American colonists were loyal British subjects who celebrated the coronation of their new King, George III. The colonies that stretched from present-day Maine to Georgia were distinctly English in character although they had been settled by Scots, Welsh, Irish, Dutch, Swedes, Finns, Africans, French, Germans, and Swiss, as well as English. As English men and women, the American colonists were heirs to the thirteenth-century English document, the Magna Carta, which established the principles that no one is above the law (not even the King), and that no one can take away certain rights.

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770 reads