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Category: History & Historiography, Yale University

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From the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries, the royal and aristocratic courts behind Europe’s most illustrious festivals printed elaborate, illustrated volumes to record the celebrations that they organized to mark births, deaths, betrothals, weddings, coronations, and visits. Often circulated for the benefit of rival noble families and in the interests of self promotion, festival books are fascinating witnesses to aristocratic culture and art during the Early Modern period.

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These two volumes from the Beinecke's collections were digitized to coincide with The Great Mirror of Folly: Finance, Culture, and the Bubbles of 1720 , a symposium co-sponsored by the Yale School of Management International Center for Finance , held at Yale University in April 2008. The starting point for this conference was an extraordinary volume likely published in 1720, The Great Mirror of Folly (or, in the original Dutch, Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid ). Early versions of this folio were published in Amsterdam within months of the 1720 economic crashes that roiled the stock markets of England, France, and the Dutch Provinces.

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On May 21st, 1969, police found the body of 19-year-old Alex Rackley on a riverbank in Middlefield, CT. Rackley was a member of the Black Panther Party, a revolutionary Black Nationalist organization founded in 1966 in California. At the time of Rackleys murder, the organization had several thousand members operating in regional chapters in major American cities; the Panthers growth and their call for violent action against racist institutions made the Party a subject of investigations by local and federal law enforcement agencies.

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Amos Gerry Beman, a Black minister in New Haven, Connecticut, was a national leader during the mid-nineteenth century. He was a proponent of abolition, suffrage, temperance and educational and moral reform. Beman grew up in Colchester, Connecticut and later Middletown, Connecticut, where his father, Jehiel Beman, was appointed pastor to the first African American church in Connecticut. Beman’s father had worked tirelessly for emancipation and civil rights, and his grandfather, Caesar Beman, had been manumitted after serving in the Revolutionary War. The Collection

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Search through one hundred maps, drawn from the Beinecke's vast collection of American and European cartography, depicting early representations of New England and North America. The Collection 100 maps, primarily woodcuts and printed engravings, from the Beinecke Library's Western Americana and General collections. Yale Collection of Western Americana, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University

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1,302 read