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Category: American history, The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration

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Treasures of Congress An exhibit in the National Archives Rotunda, Washington, DC January 21, 2000—February 19, 2001 Few institutions have been as central to the course of American history as the U.S. Congress. Most of the great issues in our national life have been played out there, and many of our most memorable political figures have served in the House of Representatives or the Senate. Congress's pivotal position was built into the American system in 1787.

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The President's Daily Diary: November 22, 1963 - January 20, 1969 The secretaries outside the Oval Office prepared President Johnson's Daily Diary. Juanita Roberts, the President's personal secretary, assigned the responsibility of preparing the Diary to secretaries in the office. A particular person would "work" the Diary for a scheduled period. As visits and telephone calls occurred, the secretary "working" the Diary would note them; occasionally the secretary missed noting a call or meeting. White House staff who worked closely with the President frequently entered the Oval Office without the visit being noted in the Diary.

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861 reads

A note on the photographs in this exhibition Because of the huge number of images held by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), selecting photographs for this exhibition involved difficult and subjective choices. For the most part, the exhibit concentrates on developments within American society and on activities abroad where Americans were significant participants. The photographs from the White House Photo Office were included because they will become part of the Clinton Presidential Library, and because they allowed the exhibit to round out its coverage of the late 20th century.

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907 reads

This exhibit highlights the contributions of the thousands of Americans, both military and civilian, who served their country during World War II. Documents from the National Archives and Records Administration's (NARA) National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis form the core of the exhibit. For those who lived through the Second World War, this exhibit may help them recall their experiences. For those who did not, it is hoped they will gain a deeper understanding of the sacrifice and commitment of those Americans who, after almost four years, were "A People at War."

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1,046 read

Inside the National Archives Southeast Region 1. Welcome The Southeast Region of the National Archives holds in trust original records documenting the settlement and development of a unique section of the United States. It maintains historical records from regional offices of Federal agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. These records are the documentary evidence of day-to-day occurrences that have become part of our history. This presentation highlights treasures in the region's holdings. It tells intriguing stories of the people who once inhabited this land. Some documents are about famous people and events.

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817 reads

Since the signing of the Declaration of Independence, our rights as citizens of the United States have been debated, contested, amended, and documented. The Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, established our basic civil rights. Later amendments and court decisions have continued the process of defining our human and civil rights. Documents in the National Archives give voice to our national struggle for personal rights and freedoms. From the Emancipation Proclamation to the five cases that comprised Brown v. Board of Education , this exhibit features a sampling of documents from all regions of the National Archives.

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947 reads

Looking Back on the American Century February 5 � April 30, 2000 In 1940 publisher Henry Luce used the phrase "the American Century" to describe the emergence of the United States as the preeminent world power. Beginning with the accession of a young and energetic Theodore Roosevelt to the Presidency in 1901, the United States began to turn its vast resources onto the world stage. Since that time, through world wars, depression, boom times, social upheavals, scientific and technological developments, and cultural trends, the United States vigorously placed its stamp of influence on the 20th Century. This exhibition presents a small taste of the American Century.

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In 1761, fifteen years before the United States of America burst onto the world stage with the Declaration of Independence, the American colonists were loyal British subjects who celebrated the coronation of their new King, George III. The colonies that stretched from present-day Maine to Georgia were distinctly English in character although they had been settled by Scots, Welsh, Irish, Dutch, Swedes, Finns, Africans, French, Germans, and Swiss, as well as English. As English men and women, the American colonists were heirs to the thirteenth-century English document, the Magna Carta, which established the principles that no one is above the law (not even the King), and that no one can take away certain rights.

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April 22 -- October 29, 2000 "Remember the ladies," Abigail Adams had admonished her husband when our forefathers wrote the Declaration of Independence. This advice was ignored not only by John Adams but also by many subsequent generations. Now, over 200 years later, we see an encouraging transformation toward equal rights for women and a new curiosity about women's history. A fascinating array of female personalities have shaped our American experience,106 of whom are featured in our exhibit. Our opening gallery showcases unforgettable women who represent many qualities worthy of our appreciation. Then journey through time as women's struggles and progress from colonial times to the present are told through historical narratives and short biographies.

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923 reads

"American Originals" is a changing exhibit that has presented the nation's greatest documentary treasures in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building since December 1995. Over the years, the exhibit has featured the first printing of the Declaration of Independence, the police blotter listing Abraham Lincoln's assassination, the first report of the Titanic's collision with an iceberg, Rosa Parks's arrest records, and many other items. Both famous and rare, these documents provide unique insights into the towering figures and events that have shaped U.S. history.

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710 reads

Here will be preserved all . . . the records that bind State to State and the hearts of all our people in an indissoluble union. --President Herbert Hoover, upon laying the cornerstone of the National Archives Building, February 20, 1933 American Originals presents some of the most treasured documents in the holdings of the National Archives. They have passed through the hands of George Washington, Helen Keller, Wyatt Earp, Napoleon, Rosa Parks, and John Hancock, connecting us physically to another moment in time. While some of the documents announce their own importance with a grand design, others quietly mark a revolution.

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Here will be preserved all . . . the records that bind State to State and the hearts of all our people in an indissoluble union. --President Herbert Hoover, upon laying the cornerstone of the National Archives Building, February 20, 1933 In 1803 the young republic nearly doubles in size with the Louisiana Purchase. A casualty list of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment reveals the sacrifices of the most celebrated African-American regiment that fought in the Civil War. A police blotter lists the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, April 14, 1865.

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928 reads