▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to refine your current search.

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

: all » Politics

City

Country

Province Or State

More options
[×]

Social Tags

: Politics

Category: Politics

Results 1 - 21 of 65

Results

Africa Past and Present is a podcast about history, culture, and politics in Africa and the diaspora. The show highlights interesting and significant people, ideas, and discussions in African Studies from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives. Our mission is to broaden the availability and accessibility of cutting-edge knowledge relating to African experiences and to do so in a down-to-earth and informed manner. Shows feature interviews with eminent scholars and persons, commentary on current events, and issues and debates of relevance to Africans at home and abroad.

0
♥ 0
504 reads

My Collections DIGITAL LIBRARY The Theodore Roosevelt Digital Library includes letters to and from Roosevelt, diary entries, notes, political cartoons, scrapbooks, and more. Timeline Explore the timelines for important dates in TR’s personal and political life, military career, publications, hunting and exploration trips, as well as his time in Dakota Territory. About Us News Explore digital updates, articles and upcoming events. Mission Our goal here at the Theodore Roosevelt Center is to raise the profile of Theodore Roosevelt and to preserve his legacy through events, publications, and the creation of a comprehensive digital presidential library that is freely accessible worldwide via the internet.

0
♥ 3
492 reads

The Marxists Internet Archive (MIA, http://www.marxists.org/) is an all-volunteer, non-profit public library, started more than 20 years ago in 1990. In 2006, MIA averaged 1.1 million visitors per month, downloading 15.5 million files per month. This represents a 25% increase in visitors since 2005, and a 380% increase in visitors since 2000.

0
♥ 2
201 reads

On May 21st, 1969, police found the body of 19-year-old Alex Rackley on a riverbank in Middlefield, CT. Rackley was a member of the Black Panther Party, a revolutionary Black Nationalist organization founded in 1966 in California. At the time of Rackleys murder, the organization had several thousand members operating in regional chapters in major American cities; the Panthers growth and their call for violent action against racist institutions made the Party a subject of investigations by local and federal law enforcement agencies.

0
♥ 0
298 reads

New Political Alphabet, or, a Little Book for Great Boys This twenty three page book of alphabet rhymes was published in Windham, Connecticut in 1813, by Samuel Webb. For the letter A: "Great A stands for Adam’s administration and B for betraying the rights of the nation." This rhyme refers to John Adams, the second president of the United States and a conservative Federalist who signed the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798. Although the New Political Alphabet was published twelve years after Adams left office, the author likely remains anonymous due to the political tone of this rhyme.

0
♥ 0
132 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Collection The Romano L. Mazzoli Oral History Collection documents the life and political career of Congressman Romano (Ron) Mazzoli, an Italian-American native of Louisville, Kentucky who represented Kentucky's Third Congressional District for 24 years (1971-1995). The 66 hours of interviews complement and move beyond the congressman's papers (also housed at the University of Louisville Archives and Records Center), including documentation of the workings of his local and Washington offices, interactions with constituents and colleagues, and his role on the national stage, as well as reminiscences by family, friends, and Mazzoli himself.

0
♥ 1
157 reads

DIGITAL COLLECTIONS About the Law Library The Law Library is a major regional resource for legal information, serving the university community, the practicing bar, and the general public. Its primary mission is to support the curriculum and the research needs of the faculty and the students of the University of Louisville Louis D. Brandeis School of Law. However, as part of an historic and distinguished law school whose roots reach deeply into Kentucky legal history, the Law Library has over the years accumulated rich collections of materials of national and state legal publications, many of which date back to the foundation of the American republic. In addition, through the efforts of Louisville native Louis D.

0
♥ 0
142 reads

The Suez Crisis The 1956 Suez Crisis is one of the most important and controversial events in British history since the Second World War. Not only did Suez result in deep political and public division in Britain, it also caused international uproar. It has come to be regarded as the end of Britain's role as one of the world powers and as the beginning of the end for the British Empire. In future British foreign policy would be conducted in concurrence with American diplomatic support. This special online exhibition has been developed to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Crisis.

0
♥ 1
228 reads

1904 - 2004 Colloque franco-britannique To coincide with the colloque franco-britannique events in Oxford and London (14-15 October 2004) the latest additions to the website illustrate two different aspects of the impact made by King Edward VII's visit to Paris in April 1903. The first is an extract from one of the many press cuttings in Sir Edmond Monson's papers marking the event. Provided by Romeike & Curtis, a press cutting agency in Ludgate Circus Buildings, London, the cutting from the Belfast Newsletter of 8 May 1903 describes the culinary impact of the visit and the King's preference for simple table settings. The second extract is taken from the centenary lecture given by Dr.

0
♥ 2
772 reads

Posters from the Conservative Party Archive representing election publicity throughout the 20th century up to recent times. Conservative Party Archive: Poster Collection
All images are copyright the Bodleian Library and are free for private use and teaching provided you acknowledge the source. A full copyright statement and a permissions form for all other uses, including publication, are available here. Higher resolution images are available via the Bodleian Library Imaging Services.

0
♥ 0
188 reads

Bodleian Library, Oxford Dec 2007 - Apr 2008 Introduction John Milton was born 400 years ago, and his ideas about citizenship are still relevant to us today. The author of the greatest epic poem in English, Paradise Lost , was also a reforming prose writer, a member of a revolutionary government, and the victim of censorship, whose daring positions we now consider vital to modern governance. Advocate of freedom of the press, transparency in government, public debate, education for liberty, the right to divorce, the disestablishment of the church and the abolition of monarchy, Milton espoused positions radical even by today's standards.

0
♥ 0
144 reads

Marking 100 years since H.H. Asquith became Prime Minister 100 years ago H.H. Asquith (1852-1928) became Prime Minister. In continuous office for over eight years from 1908 to 1916, he was at the helm of a government which re-modelled the British political landscape and introduced innovatory social measures. The introduction of old age pensions, national insurance, and employment exchanges, and the reform of the House of Lords, are among the developments chronicled in Asquith's papers and those of his political colleagues held at the Bodleian . Long standing issues such as Irish home rule and women's suffrage also had to be addressed.

0
♥ 0
126 reads

March 2002 The Aspect project was set up to create a digital archive of the ephemera - leaflets, flyers, postcards, newsletters - produced by candidates and political parties for the first Scottish parliamentary election in May 1999. The project is funded by the University of Strathclyde's Directorate of Information Strategy The archive is based on the collection of election ephemera held by the Andersonian Library at the University of Strathclyde, which is acknowledged to be an important and unique record of a key event in Scottish history. The creation of a digital archive will significantly improve the accessibility and usability of the information contained within the collection whilst conserving the original materials, which may be subject to deterioration through loss and damage.

0
♥ 0
104 reads

Last Updated: 19/03/2004 Disclaimer: This website is best viewed with a monitor resolution of at least 1024x768. eMail: victoriantimes@cdlr.strath.ac.uk Victorian Times is funded by the New Opportunities Fund (NOF) under their digitisation funding strand. � Centre for Digital Library Research, University of Strathclyde, 2003-2009

0
♥ 0
269 reads

August 2003 James Maxton was one of the leading figures of the Independent Labour Party (ILP) in Glasgow and a key political figure during the Red Clydeside period. Like many of his colleagues in the ILP, Maxton was a pacifist and campaigned against Britain's involvement in the first world war and against the introduction of conscription. Maxton was imprisoned in 1916 for delivering pro-strike speeches at a demonstration to oppose the Munitions Act. Maxton was elected MP for Bridgeton in 1922 and devoted much of his political life to alleviating poverty within the city of Glasgow. Maxton attempted on several occasions to steer the Parliamentary Labour Party in the direction of a strictly socialist programme of policies.

0
♥ 0
118 reads

Elvis Presley met President Richard Nixon in the Oval Office on December 21, 1970. This is the behind-the-scenes story of how and why the meeting occured told through the original photographs, letters and memos created by Presley and the White House staff.

0
♥ 0
159 reads

What’s Cooking Uncle Sam? An Exhibition at the National Archives through January 3, 2012 Food. We love it, fear it, and obsess about it. We demand that our Government ensure that it is safe, cheap, and abundant. In response, Government has been a factor in the production, regulation, research, innovation, and economics of our food supply. It has also attempted, with varying success, to change the eating habits of Americans. From the farm to the dinner table, explore the records of the National Archives that trace the Government’s effect on what Americans eat.

0
♥ 0
145 reads

When Judge John Sirica gaveled the trial of the Watergate seven to order on January 8, 1973, federal investigators had already discovered a covert slush fund used to underwrite nefarious activities against Democrats. The money and the men on trial could be linked to the Committee to Re-elect the President (CRP) at whose head sat the former Attorney General of the United States, and President Nixon’s former law partner, John Mitchell. At the trial, E. Howard Hunt, who had planned the break-in, and four of the burglars pleaded guilty. G. Gordon Liddy, who helped in the planning, and James McCord, the other burglar, refused to cooperate, were convicted of various charges, and sentenced to prison.

0
♥ 0
204 reads

Treasures of Congress An exhibit in the National Archives Rotunda, Washington, DC January 21, 2000—February 19, 2001 Few institutions have been as central to the course of American history as the U.S. Congress. Most of the great issues in our national life have been played out there, and many of our most memorable political figures have served in the House of Representatives or the Senate. Congress's pivotal position was built into the American system in 1787.

0
♥ 0
165 reads

    About This Exhibit Tokens and Treasures Gifts to Twelve Presidents   The exhibition "Tokens and Treasures, Gifts to Twelve Presidents" was displayed in the Circular Gallery of the National Archives, March 22, 1996 through February 2, 1997. This exhibit showcases over 200 gifts sent to Presidents Hoover through Clinton.

0
♥ 0
120 reads

The National Archives and Records Administration Clifford K. Berryman: Political Cartoonist Extraordinaire In 1886 at the age of 17, Clifford K. Berryman moved from Kentucky to Washington, DC, to work at the U.S. Patent Office, where he used his self-taught talents to draw patent illustrations. He left the Patent Office in 1891 to become a cartoonist’s understudy for the Washington Post. Within five years, Berryman was chief cartoonist, a position he held until 1907 when he became the front-page cartoonist at the Washington Evening Star. Berryman drew political cartoons for the Star until his death in 1949 at the age of 80. Washington political circles embraced Berryman’s cartooning.

0
♥ 0
172 reads