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Toronto is celebrating its 175 th anniversary by engaging the community to a number of events. The city’s celebrations include museum tours, literary reading and book launches, music, art, festivals and a song competition. In celebration of this anniversary, Toronto Public Library invites you to explore Toronto's past with material from the Special Collections at the Toronto Reference Library. Click on each image below to explore. To learn more about the history of Toronto, explore these past exhibits: Also, check out the following two books from our Curator's Showcase : To search for more historical images of Toronto from our collections:

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Introduction The 19 th century was a period of expansion and development in Canadian history. The century brought unprecedented change, from the Union of Upper and Lower Canada and the Confederation of the Canadian colonies, to the establishment of the western provinces. Fortifications and other military structures were erected and roads and railway networks constructed, ushering in waves of immigration as colonization and settlement pushed westward. In its wake the face of the Canadian landscape was altered, and to some extent the vast wilderness was diminished. In the era before the camera, artists, surveyors and engineers preserved on paper and canvas a record of the landscape.

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Welcome to Local Flavour. This virtual exhibit surveys the various aspects of eating in Toronto over a span of 125 years. To turn the pages of Toronto's, click your mouse near the edge of the page to the right and then drag the mouse across to turn page. Or use the 'Next page' and 'Previous page' buttons at the top to flip through pages. You can also use the 'Go to page...' dropdown menu to quickly jump to any section of the exhibit.

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Discovery at your fingertips.... Come explore the Curator’s Showcase. We have digitized seven treasures from the Toronto Public Library’s rich and varied special collections, and added pictures, maps, notes and more. Using the Library’s interactive software, you can virtually turn the pages of the books. You can zoom in on the digitized images and also find related texts, images and sounds. Other features specific to individual books are provided, such as transcriptions of handwritten pages. This project was inspired by the British Library Turning the Pages program. To experience a touch sensitive version of the Showcase, visit the Special Collections Digital Kiosk at the Toronto Reference Library .

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The Toronto Public Library (TPL) has long been committed to an active exhibition program for its Special Collections in the Canada Trust Gallery at the Toronto Reference Library. The virtual version of Footprints of the Hound recreates in part the exhibition on display in our Gallery from October 20 – December 2, 2001.

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Introduction The Special Collections at the Toronto Reference Library reveal a wonderful diversity of focus, form, age and content. Together, they form a cultural legacy that began in the late nineteenth century with the opening of Toronto's first public library. They continue to grow through acquisition and donation to ensure that users today and tomorrow have free access to their cultural and literary heritage. From the humble to the exquisite, each item in the collection has been treasured and preserved, and its story maintained by the librarians of the Toronto Public Library. In celebration of the Toronto Reference Library's thirtieth year at 789 Yonge Street, we proudly present a special exhibition from these collected works.

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Introduction The second half of the nineteenth century was a time of wealth, optimism and growth in Toronto. Architecturally, it was an era that would drastically change the appearance of Toronto forever. A small but dedicated number of architects would infuse Toronto’s landscape with a variety of structures, possibly, the most striking being the churches, with their soaring spires, ornate towers and other Gothic Revival attributes. This exhibition honours one of these architects, Henry Langley, and features the Toronto churches that he designed, built and completed. Henry Langley, 1836-1907, was born in Toronto. He obtained his architectural training by apprenticing for seven years with an established architect, Scottish-born, William Hay, 1818-1888.

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Pictures came before books, printing or writing, and were our first expression of stories. The Canadian artist Marie Day celebrated the power of cave art in her picture book Quennu and the Cave Bear , an imaginative recreation of how a young girl of the Stone Age conquered her fear of a ferocious cave bear by drawing him. The Stone Age makes a fitting start to an exhibition celebrating Canadian picture books, within which there are no boundaries of place or time. In chronological terms, the earliest painting in this exhibit is 42, the latest, only three years old. The earliest artefact shown here is nearly 3,000 years old, and the story of Quennu depicts a period over 20,000 years ago.

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Opera Atelier holds a unique place in the North American theatre community, producing opera, ballet and drama performances that draw upon the aesthetics and ideals of the 17th and 18th centuries. Featuring acclaimed international soloists, period ballet (Artists of Atelier Ballet), original instruments, elaborate stage décor, exquisite costumes and most importantly, an imaginative energy, Toronto-based Opera Atelier has attained international recognition.

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Introduction From the time of Columbus, the American continent was seen by Europeans as a barrier between Europe and the Orient. A passage through it was the prime object of many voyages of exploration. Magellan had sailed around South America in 1520, but the icy northern shores were mysterious and seemed unassailable. The search for a sea route across the top of North America began in the 16th century as a commercial venture sponsored by London merchants. By the 19th century it was obvious that a Northwest Passage would not be a useful seaway, but finding it became an obsession, as did the attainment of the North Pole late in the century.

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 Foreword The Group of Seven style of painting captured the rhythm and mood of the nation???s landscape. From Algonquin to Algoma, Lake Superior to the Rocky Mountains, Quebec to Nova Scotia, the artists traveled in search of the quintessential Canadian landscape painting. Armed with canoes, boards and paints, they interpreted the chaotic mass of nature in a bold, modern approach that differed from the Academic convention. To finance their expeditions, many of the artists worked in commercial art firms, designing illustrations, advertisements and elegant illuminated texts.

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Rt. Hon. Arthur Meighen, address to the Senate, September 10, 1939. In September 1939, Canadians prepared for another war with memories of the Great War still fresh in their minds. It was determined that Canada’s war effort would be concentrated in financial and industrial support, and the first priority would be to secure the nation’s borders. By the spring of 1940, the progress of the war in Europe had changed dramatically. With the German invasion of Denmark, Norway, Belgium and Holland, and the fall of France, Canadians reassessed their own vulnerability. The spectre of a German victory became real.

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Kabuki is a performing art that combines music, dance, pantomime, song, drama and comedy. In the early 1600s kabuki emerged from traditional Japanese classical theatre and puppet show traditions, incorporating elements of both.

While classical plays are quiet, refined and slow-paced, kabuki is full of spirited action and outsized emotions. Kabuki plays portray characters from Japanese history, legend and folk tales. Great heroes, beautiful princesses, evil spirits, loyal retainers, vengeful warriers and benevolent lords populate the stage. These stories have continued to grip the Japanese imagination, embodying as they do the much-valued ideals of loyalty, courage and strength.

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, Toronto Public Library's virtual exhibition that celebrates 10,000 years of the city's history. It recreates the exhibition on display at the TD Gallery, Toronto Reference Library, June 29 - September 22, 2002 and May 17 - August 2, 2003. Images are from the Library's Special Collections and private collections. The virtual exhibition is divided into five eras, beginning with the first human presence in the city 8000 BC and ending with modern city of 2003. You can explore the city's past by clicking one of the images on the map or a time period on the navigation bar. Each era begins with an Overview History , which summarizes the major trends and developments that shaped that time period.

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The Osborne Collection encompasses the development of English-language children's literature, ranging from a 14 th -century manuscript of Aesop's fables through 15 th -century traditional tales, 16 th -century school texts and courtesy books, Puritan works, 18 th -century chapbooks, moral tales and rational recreations, Victorian classics of fantasy, adventure and school stories, up to 1910 – the end of the Edwardian era. The Collection is enriched with the Lillian H. Smith Collection of modern notable English-language books and with Canadiana materials that together illustrate the links between the early and modern books, and provide a rich resource of our vibrant Canadian heritage, preserved for future generations.

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The Toronto Public Library (TPL) has long been committed to an active exhibition program for its Local History and Special Collections in the Canada Trust Gallery at the Toronto Reference Library and other Library venues. The virtual version of All Aboard Toronto ? Railways and the Growth of a City , fully re-creates the exhibition on display in our Gallery from August 4 ? October 7, 2001. The exhibition explores Toronto railway history and its impact on the development of the city from the 1850s to the end of the steam era in the mid 20th century. It is illustrated with over a hundred collection items including paintings, drawings, maps, postcards, broadsides and other ephemera.

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A Case of Considerable Interest An exhibition celebrating the 35 th anniversary of the Arthur Conan Doyle Collection of the Toronto Public Library “Well, my boy, what do you think of this lot?” he asked, smiling at my expression. “It is a curious collection.” “Very curious, and the story that hangs round it will strike you as being more curious still.” - Sherlock Holmes to Dr. Watson in “The Musgrave ritual” by Arthur Conan Doyle Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) is best known for his detective stories about Sherlock Holmes, but he was also the author of many other works and one of the best known public figures of the late Victorian age.

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Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin Number 1, September 1892 About the Collection The History The diffusion of useful and practical, research-based information on agriculture and related subjects has been a primary responsibility of the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station and University of Idaho Extension since their beginnings. The University of Idaho Board of Regents established the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station at the UI in 1892 following passage of the federal Hatch Act (1887), which provided for the creation of agricultural experiment stations at state land-grant colleges.

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About the Fires The spring of 1910 was ominously dry throughout Idaho, Washington, and Montana. In the Coeur d’Alene National Forest alone, U.S. Forest Service officials had been battling fires since early April. In July, a rainless electrical storm ignited even more blazes across the Northern Rockies. Bad as it was, conditions got worse. On August 20, a “Palouser” wind whipped through the forests, creating an inferno now known as the Big Burn. The fires took the lives of nearly 90 people, leveled entire communities, burned almost 3 million acres of timber, and set US Forest Service fire policy for the next 6 decades. ?? About the Collection These materials come from the University of Idaho Library's Special Collections and Archives department.

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The Columbia River Basin Project Begun with the construction of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1933, the Columbia River Basin Project is one of the largest, and most contentious, engineering projects ever completed in the American West. Franklin Roosevelt originally authorized the construction of the dam with the intention of diverting huge portions of the Columbia River to the fertile, though arid, Washington State Interior.??With the outbreak of World War II, however, irrigation initiatives were put on hold, and hydroelectric power became the dam's primary function. This change in use proved important historically.

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A digital collection comprised of historical photograhs and documents pertaining to the history of the Dworshak Dam, selected primarily from the collection of A. B. Curtis, former mayor of Orofino, Idaho. The images and documents span the years 1952 to 1972, documenting both the legislative history that led to the dam's construction and the construction itself. To explore the collection by date or location, or to find out more about the collection, use the tabs above. Questions? questions? Contact Devin: dbecker@uidaho.edu (208) 885-7040 The Dworshak Dam Collection is a collection that is still under development.

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Questions? The Historical Gameday Program Covers Collection consists of about 150 program covers and corresponding metadata, covering the years 1908 to 1967 and including both home and away games. Covers can be browsed by place or date, using the Locations and Timeline tabs. Full programs can be browsed by request via a visit to the University of Idaho Library Special Collections & Archives department. The visual and creative skills that informed the creation of these covers demonstrate both the artistic and historical styles of their time periods. If you are interested in ordering a high resolution copy of one of these images, please contact Special Collections at libspec@uidaho.edu .

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About Us The University of Idaho Library has grown from a single classroom located in the University Administration Building in 1892, to become the largest library in the state of Idaho. The University of Idaho library houses well over a million books and almost ten thousand periodical subscriptions, in print and online. It has served for over a century as an official regional depository of U.S. federal government publications, making almost two million government documents available to the public.

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ABOUT THE CAMP The Kooskia (pronounced KOOS-key) Internment Camp is an obscure and virtually forgotten World War II detention facility that was located in a remote area of north central Idaho, 30 miles from the town of Kooskia, and 6 miles east of the hamlet of Lowell, at Canyon Creek. The camp was administered by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for the U.S. Department of Justice. It held men of Japanese ancestry who were termed "enemy aliens," even though most of them were long-time U.S. residents.

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About Lewiston Orchards Life Lewiston Orchards Life was a neighborhood newsletter published in Lewiston, Idaho during the early 1900s that covered the horticultural and residential events of those living in Lewiston Orchards. Special Collection & Archives at the University of Idaho Library holds fourteen issues as part of their Day Northwest Collection. About Lewiston Orchards Now a residential neighborhood in Lewiston, Idaho, Lewiston Orchards was once a vast commercial garden. The area produced apples, apricots, cherries, berries, plums, pears, quinces, peaches, nuts, lettuce, and grapes in abundance. The ???Orchards??? grew out of an ambitious land development and irrigation project, which was conceived and undertaken by Harry L. Powers at the turn of the 20th century.

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About the Collection The Family Tree was a newsletter published by Potlatch Forests, Inc. for their employees from 1936 - 1952. The newsletter covers local (Northern Idaho) and national events, with a special focus on issues pertaining to Potlatch Forests, Inc. and its loggers and other employees. The content varies greatly — from reports on the head injuries of sawmill workers to editorials on the war crimes of Hirohito , written near the end of WWII — and is consistently well-written and evocative of the daily life of Potlatch workers and their families during these years. Some other interesting Family Tree articles include: The collection was digitized in the summer of 2010, per user request.

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Have questions? Project Title:  Idaho Waters Digital Library About the Project: The Idaho Waters Digital Library provides access to information resources relating to water issues in key Idaho river basins.  The collection presently includes scientific and technical reports, with an emphasis on Idaho Water Resources Research Institute reports and publications.  This centralized digital repository provides a searchable interface for discovery and utilization of water resources documents.  As funding sources are identified, this collection will continue to grow in size and scope.  Digitized materials from this collection are also available through the Western Waters Digital Library .

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UAF is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and educational institution. Maintained by UAF-APR-reference-Service@alaska.edu Page last modified Website designed by WebWeavers Technology Group

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About Alaska's Digital Archives The Alaska Virtual Library and Digital Archives project is a collaborative effort initiated by the Rasmuson Library at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Consortium Library at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and the Alaska State Library in Juneau. Learn more about our partners . Now in its third phase, the initiative is funded by a congressional award and contributions from these institutions with additional support of the Rasmuson Foundation. The goal of the project is to support the instructional and research needs of Alaskans and others interested in Alaska history and culture. Initial activities focused on scanning, indexing, and placing 5,000 historical images into an online, searchable database.

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Latest News Clarence Alexander Long Time Jukebox Contributor is Honored by President Obama Submitted by admin on Fri, 10/14/2011 - 09:19 Watch Clarence's climate change interview at Stakeholders & Climate Change Bethel Communities of Memory is now available The Bethel Communities of Memory Project Jukebox features people from the Bethel area talking about life in their remote community. The original gathering took place in 1996, but many of the stories still hold true. Dog Mushing in Alaska Project Jukebox is live! The Dog Mushing in Alaska Project Jukebox website features oral histories, historic film clips, and still photographs to highlight various aspects of dog mushing in Alaska.

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