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The Ted Stevens Papers Collection documents the career of Theodore Fulton (Ted) Stevens (1923-2010), Senator from the State of Alaska from 1968-2009, the longest-serving Republican member of the United States Congress. Stevens was a leading force in the creation of legislation concerning Alaska???s economic, social and cultural development. The collection, measuring nearly 5000 cubic feet in its entirety, contains the history of Stevens??? long senatorial career, and chronicles Alaska???s transition from a newly-minted state to a significant player in US history. Documents within the collection relate to the administrative, legislative and political functions of Stevens??? office.

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405 reads

       The written literature about Inuit/Eskimo peoples is a rich resource of great value to today’s students, scholars, educators, researchers, and northern residents. Yet many of the most interesting and valuable accounts derived from early contact situations are rare, out-of-print, or otherwise unavailable—especially to northern communities. The goal of the Hubert Wenger Eskimo Database project has been to make many of these early and primary accounts more widely available through digital media.         Nearly 200 titles—primarily books and journal articles—have been included in the database and are uniformly searchable with powerful text-retrieval software.

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347 reads

Protesta Humana This collection contains rare examples of anarchist, socialist, and communist newspapers published in Buenos Aires during the late nineteenth century. The UCLA Digital Library Program is working with members of the History Department to provide these newspapers in searchable full-text versions. Esta colección contiene ejemplos raros de los periódicos anarquista, socialista, y comunista publicados en Buenos Aires durante el a fines del siglo diecinueve.

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427 reads

Students in the Drew/UCLA medical program conduct an original research project related to the Primary Care program as part of their graduation requirements. The research projects generally grow from the students experiences in the Primary Care program continuity clinic that the students attend throughout their third year. During this year, students develop their research question, write a protocol, and obtain IRB approval for their research. Research is mainly conducted throughout the 4th year, culminating in a research paper and presentation at a student research colloquium. This research program will be transforming into a full medical thesis program beginning with the class of 2004.

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384 reads

The Gerrit Smith Broadside and Pamplet Collection Using the Collection The collection of broadsides and pamphlets can be accessed via the Library's CONTENTdm server and can be browsed as well as being fully searchable by keyword, title, series title, and author. Collection Searches About the Collection Included among the publications authored by Gerrit Smith are various circulars, speeches, sermons, and tracts which deal with such topics as abolition, suffrage, temperance, transportation, and the postal system. With this project, we can now provide full text access to 214 of these important publications.

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408 reads

Medieval Manuscripts Descriptive information and selected images from ten western medieval manuscripts ranging from the 13th through the 16th centuries. The collection includes an apocalyptic text by Telesphorus; glossed decretals of popes Innocent IV and Gregory IX; a Dominican gradual of saints; a part of the Old Testament which consists of a fragment of the Books of Tobit and Esther, and a complete Book of Judith; and six Books of Hours. About the Collection The Special Collections Department of the Syracuse University Library is fortunate to hold a small but significant collection of Latin medieval manuscripts on parchment of Spanish, English, Italian, French, Flemish, and German/Austrian origin which range in date from the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries.

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460 reads

Oneida Community Collection In 1960 Syracuse University Library acquired complete runs of the serial publications of Oneida Community and of its antecedents and branches, covering the span of years from 1837 until 1879. In 1983 the Library received a large collection of the surviving records of the Community. We are happy to be able to provide these additional primary documents for the scholars from Syracuse and elsewhere who have been coming to us for many years. Some Oneida Community documents have been digitized.  Transcriptions are available online on the References page . About the Collection There have been several reasons for the Syracuse University Library to collect materials about Oneida Community and its antecedents and branches.

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309 reads

About From Nylon to Polyethylene, plastics surround us. This website combines narratives about the people, materials, and corporations responsible for our cultural embrace of plastic with a searchable digital collection of original research materials from Syracuse University Library, including manuscripts, printed materials, photographs, and artifacts. Many of these materials are also available to scholars and researchers who visit Syracuse University Library. The Plastics Collection at the Syracuse University Library, founded in 2008, is the largest university-based resource on the history of plastics.

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404 reads

Street & Smith Dime Novel Covers Brief History of Street & Smith  In 1855, when Francis Scott Street and Francis Shubael Smith bought The New York Weekly Dispatch , Street & Smith embarked on a publishing mission that remained remarkably prolific and profitable for over one hundred years. Street & Smith rapidly became a "fiction factory," producing a wide variety of popular literature, including dime novels, pulp magazines, books in series for juveniles, fashion and homemaking magazines, comics, and adventure stories. The company viewed fiction as a commodity, with Street & Smith editors dictating plots, character types, and other conventions to the firm's stable of writers.

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299 reads

“I have no Knowledge of it at all,” wrote Ezra Stiles of alchemy.  “I never saw Transmutation, the aurific Powder, nor the Philosophers Stone,” the early President of Yale College continued, “nor did I ever converse with an Adept knowing him to be such. ...

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430 reads

New Political Alphabet, or, a Little Book for Great Boys This twenty three page book of alphabet rhymes was published in Windham, Connecticut in 1813, by Samuel Webb. For the letter A: "Great A stands for Adam’s administration and B for betraying the rights of the nation." This rhyme refers to John Adams, the second president of the United States and a conservative Federalist who signed the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798. Although the New Political Alphabet was published twelve years after Adams left office, the author likely remains anonymous due to the political tone of this rhyme.

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271 reads

James Baldwin, 1955 September 13, by Carl Van Vechten The provenance of the James Baldwin Early Manuscripts and Papers collection is a matter of some intrigue. The donor, Bart Kaplan, acquired the papers through eminent domain, after his company took possession of a storage building in downtown Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, sometime in the early 1960s. The space in which they were stored had apparently once belonged to a publishing company which had left behind a suitcase containing these materials from James Baldwin. The relationship between Baldwin and the publishing company, as well as how a small parcel of his earliest literary effects was left with them, is uncertain.

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251 reads

The Arthurian Romances, or MS 229, is one of the jewels in the crown of medieval manuscript illumination. Written in Northern France toward the end of the 13th century, this copy of the great French romance is known for the abundance and richness of its illuminations, and even more so for the intricacy, mystery, and wildness of the images in the margins including animals, jesters, archers, and musicians. About the Codex Parchment, ff. i (paper) + 363 + i (paper). Written in elegant gothic textura by one scribe, with a few interlinear corrections in later hands.

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320 reads

The Elizabeth Jenks Clark Collection of Margaret Anderson contains correspondence, writings, photographs, sound recordings, and other papers of writer and editor Margaret Anderson. The material documents Anderson's life, work, and personal relationships with many noted writers, poets, artists, photographers and performers of the twentieth century, in particular her romantic relationships with co-editor and writer Jane Heap, writer Solita Solano and close friendship with sculptor Elizabeth Jenks Clark. The papers span the entirety of Anderson's life, though the bulk of them document her personal and professional life after the Little Review .

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400 reads

Amos Gerry Beman, a Black minister in New Haven, Connecticut, was a national leader during the mid-nineteenth century. He was a proponent of abolition, suffrage, temperance and educational and moral reform. Beman grew up in Colchester, Connecticut and later Middletown, Connecticut, where his father, Jehiel Beman, was appointed pastor to the first African American church in Connecticut. Beman’s father had worked tirelessly for emancipation and civil rights, and his grandfather, Caesar Beman, had been manumitted after serving in the Revolutionary War. The Collection

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302 reads

On May 21st, 1969, police found the body of 19-year-old Alex Rackley on a riverbank in Middlefield, CT. Rackley was a member of the Black Panther Party, a revolutionary Black Nationalist organization founded in 1966 in California. At the time of Rackleys murder, the organization had several thousand members operating in regional chapters in major American cities; the Panthers growth and their call for violent action against racist institutions made the Party a subject of investigations by local and federal law enforcement agencies.

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438 reads

196 boxes containing the correspondence, diaries, and manuscripts of James Boswell; estate records, letters, personal and professional papers, and other materials documenting the lives and careers of generations of Boswells and their possession of the barony of Auchinleck; and correspondence relating to the political career of Alexander Bruce, Earl of Kincardine. Currently, only a portion of the Boswell Papers are available online. Call Number: GEN MSS 89 Really As It Was: Writing the Life of Samuel Johnson September 18, 2009 - December 19, 2009

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350 reads

The Collection 16 volumes (in 1 case) : illus.; 22 cm. or smaller. Cite as: Joseph Goldsborough Bruff Diaries, Journals, and Notebooks. Western Americana Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

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483 reads

The Bryher Papers document the personal life and literary career of Bryher. Her extensive correspondence includes letters from H. D., Robert MacAlmon, Kenneth MacPherson, Norman Holmes Pearson, Sylvia Beach, Norman Douglas, Horace Gregory, Islay Lyons, and Edith Sitwell, and from many other figures in the fields of literature, psychoanalysis, and film. There are manuscripts of many of her works, including fragments of an unpublished volume of autobiography; financial and personal papers; material collected by Bryher on "boys’ books" authors such as R. M. Ballantyne and G. A. Henty; and documentation of Bryher’s interest in film and the making of Borderline (1930). Currently, only a portion of the Bryher Papers are available online.

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302 reads

Rachel Louise Carson, noted biologist and environmentalist who fascinated readers with three books on the wonders of the sea and awakened the American public to the dangers of pesticide misuse with a highly controversial bestseller, was born on May 27, 1907, in Springdale, Pennsylvania. She was interested in writing at an early age and submitted a number of juvenile stories, poems, and essays to leading youth magazines. Rachel Carson's first book, Under the Sea Wind , attracted little notice on its appearance in 1941. However, her second book on the sea, The Sea Around Us (1951), remained on the best-seller lists for eighty-six weeks, was eventually translated into thirty languages, and received many awards.

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398 reads

The author and dramatist J. M. Barrie (1860-1937) created this adventure story in 1901 for the Llewelyn Davies family, in particular, four of the five Llewelyn Davies children, George (1893-1915), John, known as "Jack" (1894-1959), Peter (1897-1960), and Michael (1900-1921). Barrie befriended the Llewelyn Davies family in the 1890s and his famous character "Peter Pan" was inspired by the children. This novel, titled, The boy castaways of Black Lake Island, being a record of the terrible adventures of the brothers Davies in the Summer of 1901, faithfully set forth by Peter Llewelyn Davies , includes thirty-five mounted photographs with typeset captions and a preface by Peter.

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285 reads

The Most Peculiar History of the Chewing Gum Man, Gelett Burgess (1866-1951), San Francisco, California, 1894 November. About the Author Gelett Burgess was a very prolific author, writing rhymes and stories, drawing pictures, teaching art, and editing a famous humor magazine, The Lark . Among his best-known creations are The Goops, round little creatures he used to demonstrate good and bad behavior. Burgess made a few special books for his friends and family. The ?Chewing Gum Man? was made for his sisters. This story was eventually published in The Burgess Nonsense Book in 1901.

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366 reads

The Volume Childrens talk, English & Latin : divided into several clauses : wherein the propriety of both languages is kept : that children by the help of their mother-tongue, may more easily learn to discourse in good Latine amongst themselves : there are also numbers set down betwixt both, which do shew the place and natural use of any word or phrase , by Charles Hoole, Master of Arts, L.C. Oxon, teacher of a private grammar-school betwixt Goldsmiths-Alley in Redcross-street, and Maidenhead Court in Aldersgate-street, London.

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584 reads

About the Crawl Space The poems in Crawl Space were composed using a typewriter, working on commercial paint sample cards; each card is an example of a different shade of white interior house paint. The tools of composition provided useful constraints and suggestions, which are evident in both the form and content of the poems-a meditation on walls, both real and metaphorical, in marriage and the trappings of domesticity. I drafted versions of each of the poems (necessitating frequent trips to Home Depot to replenish paint card supplies) and eventually made a few complete sets, one of which is housed in the Yale Collection of American Literature at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.

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376 reads

Katherine S. Dreier Papers / Société Anonyme Archive Artist and collector Katherine Dreier joined Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray to found the Société Anonyme, an organization designed to support and generate awareness of modernist art; the group’s name, a French phrase meaning “incorporated,” highlighted the fact that the organization was not allied with any particular artistic school. The Société Anonyme promoted new artists by arranging exhibitions to introduce audiences to their work and develop their reputations among galleries and collectors. Critics praised the Société Anonyme for its commitment to new artists and its inclusion of their work in exhibits and catalogs. Dreier played an essential role in generating American interest in and acceptance of modern art.

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274 reads

These two volumes from the Beinecke's collections were digitized to coincide with The Great Mirror of Folly: Finance, Culture, and the Bubbles of 1720 , a symposium co-sponsored by the Yale School of Management International Center for Finance , held at Yale University in April 2008. The starting point for this conference was an extraordinary volume likely published in 1720, The Great Mirror of Folly (or, in the original Dutch, Het Groote Tafereel der Dwaasheid ). Early versions of this folio were published in Amsterdam within months of the 1720 economic crashes that roiled the stock markets of England, France, and the Dutch Provinces.

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378 reads

Jonathan Edwards, among the foremost theologians and philosophers of his time, was born in East Windsor, Connecticut, on October 5, 1703. He attended Yale College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1720. Upon leaving Yale, he succeeded his grandfather, Solomon Stoddard, as minister of the Congregationalist Church at Northampton, Massachusetts from 1726 to 1750. There he became known as an evangelical preacher and stern Calvinist, helping inspire the "Great Awakening" of the 1740s. His writings, which were widely circulated, included A Faithful Narrative and Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God. In 1751 he became a missionary to the Mahican and Mohawk Indians at Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and minister to the English congregation there.

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380 reads

1 July 1944 Richard Wright (1908-1960) is perhaps best known for his critically-acclaimed collection Uncle Tom’s Children: Four Novellas (1938), his groundbreaking novel Native Son (1940) and his autobiography, first published as Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth (1945). Black Boy was the on the bestseller list from April 29 to June 6 of that year, despite being denounced as obscene in the U.S. Senate by Democrat Theodore Bilbo of Mississippi, and it solidified Wright’s reputation, at the time, as the most famous black author in America.

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1,173 read

In the autumn of 1609, the Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei turned his telescope to the heavens, deciphering the cratered face of the moon, the four satellites of Jupiter, and other previously opaque features of the heavens. When, in 1610, Galileo published his Sidereus Nuncius, or Starry Messenger, the German astronomer Johannes Kepler responded with enthusiasm, praising the significance of Galileo’s observations with his own Dissertatio cum Nuncio Sidereo, or, Conversations with the Starry Messenger (1610). To whom else did the stars speak in the early modern period?

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337 reads

Witold Gombrowicz (1904-1969), was a Polish novelist and playwright. His novels and plays include Ferdydurke (1937), Trans-Atlantyk (1953), Ślub (1953), Kosmos (1965), and Pornografia (1966). Considered one of Poland's foremost literary figures of the twentieth century, Gombrowicz's novels and plays have been translated into many languages. The Collection The archive consists of correspondence, writings, personal papers, photographs, audiovisual material and memorabilia documenting Gombrowicz’s life and literary activity chiefly during the last two decades of his life (1949-69). Currently, only a portion of the Archive is available online.

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353 reads