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Category: Photography, Text

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Creating Siapo: American Samoa 1967 Welcome to    Creating Siapo: American Samoa 1967 In summer of 1966, Joan Griffis was recruited by the National Association of Broadcasters to work as an on-air teacher in American Samoa. For the next two years, she worked in Pago Pago, American Samoa, teaching English as a second language, with her lessons being broadcast to high schools on all of the American Samoan islands. She then spent an additional two years at the Feleti Teacher Training school—later the American Samoan Community College—where she and a small staff worked closely with Samoan high school students, helping them prepare for college on the mainland, while also conducting teacher training classes. In 1970, she returned to the continental United States.

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The Minneapolis Institute of Arts' Department of Photographs includes fine historic and contemporary works that cover the history of the medium from 1839 to the present.

Featured here is a selection of more than 5200 photographs from the Museum's permanent collection, representing the work of more than 400 photographers.

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1,241 read

Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904) wished to catalogue every aspect of human and animal locomotion with his camera. He photographed hundreds of subjects engaged in actions both mundane and arcane: nude figures walking and lifting children, athletes boxing and fencing, and animals hurdling, kicking, or slowly ambling along. He was the first photographer to visually dissect these activities, creating images that delighted and mystified the public in the late 19th century.

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1,423 read

Welcome! To St. Catherine University Digital Collections Use the Search or Browse features to view items in the collection Get help anytime by using the help link in the top navigation bar St. Catherine University Digital Collections serves as the online home for unique collections on campus. These resources are made readily accessible to students, faculty, and the general public. Current collections include visual and textual materials; other collections will be added as they become available.

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Panorama of the City of Toronto, 1857 Rossin House Hotel In 1857, the roof of the hotel provided the ideal vantage point from which Armstrong, Beere & Hime photographed their Toronto. The Rossin House, on the southeast corner of King and York streets, was the tallest building in the newer commercial district of Toronto when it opened that year. It was one of the city’s pre-eminent hotels, with an 1866 guide claiming: “What the Fifth Avenue Hotel is to New York, and the Windsor is to Montreal, so the celebrated Rossin House is to Toronto.” The Rossin House was destroyed by a fire in 1862, and was rebuilt in 1863.

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Ralph M. Munroe Family Papers Ralph Middleton "Commodore" Munroe, avid yachtsman, successful businessman, and celebrated patriarch of the Munroe family, made Coconut Grove his home in the late 1800s. Munroe and his family moved to South Florida from Staten Island, New York, to provide a more beneficial environment for his wife, Eva Maelia Hewitt, who suffered from tuberculosis. Unfortunately, both his wife and daughter succumbed to illness and died shortly after their move to Miami. Munroe subsequently split his time between Staten Island and the Grove, often staying at the Peacock family hotel, The Bay View House, later known as the Peacock Inn.

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About the Collection This digital collection presents over 90 photographs taken by Harrison Forman at the outbreak of World War II in Poland. The photographic collection is supplemented by a selection of newspaper clippings and an article "Filming the Blitzkrieg," published by Forman in Travel magazine in December 1939. The photographs, documenting the Nazi invasion of Poland in September of 1939, were recently discovered in the American Geographical Society Library at the UWM Libraries. The images are part of the extensive Harrison Forman Collection that was donated to the American Geographical Society Library in 1987. Harrison Forman (1904-1978), a Wisconsin native, was an adventurous journalist, photographer, and explorer.

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Edinburgh-born John Thomson (1837-1921) was one of the great names of early photography. His photographic legacy is one of astonishing quality and depth.

Thomson's images of China and South-East Asia brought the land, culture, and people of the Far East alive for the 'armchair travellers' of Victorian Britain.

He was one of the pioneers of photojournalism, using his camera to record life on London's streets in the 1870s. As a society photographer he also captured the rich and famous in the years before the First World War.

These pages present a brief introduction to Thomson's work, with examples drawn from the National Library of Scotland's collections.

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The Kirk Papers is a collection of photographs and papers belonging to East Africa pioneer Sir John Kirk. It was acquired for the National Library of Scotland in 1998/1999 with the help of a grant of £55,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Though not as well-known as his friend and fellow-explorer David Livingstone, Kirk was a trail-blazer of empire in East Africa and a man of eminence in his day. Born in Barry, Angus, in 1832, Kirk qualified in medicine at Edinburgh University and then volunteered for medical service in the Crimea. An accomplished botanist, zoologist and diplomat, he was also a talented photographer. This is evident from the collection of over 250 photographs, many of them stunning.

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The Human Factor Introduction In the 1930s Harvard Business School colleagues Donald Davenport and Frank Ayres contacted leading businesses and requested photographs for classroom instruction—images Davenport hoped would “reveal the courage, industry and intelligence required of the American working man.” They amassed more than 2,100 photographs, from strangely beautiful views of men operating Midvale Steel’s 9,000-ton hydraulic press to women assembling tiny, delicate parts of Philco radios. Now students, and America’s aspiring corporate managers, had visual data to study “the human factor,” the interaction of worker and machine. But the pictures were more than documentary records.

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Introduction The Harvard-Yenching Library holds some 5,000 photographs and 10,000 negatives taken by Hedda Hammer Morrison (1908–1991) while resident in Beijing from 1933 to 1946. The photographs, mounted in thematic albums prepared by Mrs. Morrison, and the negatives, were bequeathed to the Harvard-Yenching Library, "the best permanent home for her vision of a city and people that she loved [Alastair Morrison]." All of the photographs contained in the 28 albums assembled by Hedda Morrison have been cataloged and digitized and can be viewed in VIA (Visual Information Access), the union catalog of visual resources at Harvard.

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