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: Social Sciences » History & Historiography
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Category: History & Historiography, University of Idaho

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ABOUT THE CAMP The Kooskia (pronounced KOOS-key) Internment Camp is an obscure and virtually forgotten World War II detention facility that was located in a remote area of north central Idaho, 30 miles from the town of Kooskia, and 6 miles east of the hamlet of Lowell, at Canyon Creek. The camp was administered by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for the U.S. Department of Justice. It held men of Japanese ancestry who were termed "enemy aliens," even though most of them were long-time U.S. residents.

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A digital collection comprised of historical photograhs and documents pertaining to the history of the University of Idaho, selected from several different collections held by the University of Idaho Library Special Collections & Archives. The images and documents span the years 1889 to 1975, documenting campus life at the University. To explore the collection by date or location, or to find out more about the collection, use the tabs above. Questions? questions? Contact Devin: dbecker@uidaho.edu (208) 885-7040 The photographs from this collection come from a variety of individual collections held by the University of Idaho Library's Special Collections & Archives Department.

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About the Fires The spring of 1910 was ominously dry throughout Idaho, Washington, and Montana. In the Coeur d’Alene National Forest alone, U.S. Forest Service officials had been battling fires since early April. In July, a rainless electrical storm ignited even more blazes across the Northern Rockies. Bad as it was, conditions got worse. On August 20, a “Palouser” wind whipped through the forests, creating an inferno now known as the Big Burn. The fires took the lives of nearly 90 people, leveled entire communities, burned almost 3 million acres of timber, and set US Forest Service fire policy for the next 6 decades. ?? About the Collection These materials come from the University of Idaho Library's Special Collections and Archives department.

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