▼ Refine Your Categories ▼

Click a term to refine your current search.

Subject

: all » Social Sciences » History & Historiography

Resource Type

Language

Social Tags

Organization

City

Country

Province Or State

More options
[×]

Subject

: Social Sciences » History & Historiography

Category: History & Historiography

Results 64 - 84 of 116

Results

A note on the photographs in this exhibition Because of the huge number of images held by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), selecting photographs for this exhibition involved difficult and subjective choices. For the most part, the exhibit concentrates on developments within American society and on activities abroad where Americans were significant participants. The photographs from the White House Photo Office were included because they will become part of the Clinton Presidential Library, and because they allowed the exhibit to round out its coverage of the late 20th century.

0
♥ 0
935 reads

Inside the National Archives Southeast Region 1. Welcome The Southeast Region of the National Archives holds in trust original records documenting the settlement and development of a unique section of the United States. It maintains historical records from regional offices of Federal agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. These records are the documentary evidence of day-to-day occurrences that have become part of our history. This presentation highlights treasures in the region's holdings. It tells intriguing stories of the people who once inhabited this land. Some documents are about famous people and events.

8
♥ 0
856 reads

National Archives and Records Administraton Eyewitness American Originals from the National Archives Introduction Out of the stacks and vaults of the National Archives comes this selection of eyewitness accounts. They are vivid and intensely personal, transporting us to a deeper understanding of the events described.

0
♥ 0
985 reads

Since the signing of the Declaration of Independence, our rights as citizens of the United States have been debated, contested, amended, and documented. The Bill of Rights, the first 10 amendments to the Constitution, established our basic civil rights. Later amendments and court decisions have continued the process of defining our human and civil rights. Documents in the National Archives give voice to our national struggle for personal rights and freedoms. From the Emancipation Proclamation to the five cases that comprised Brown v. Board of Education , this exhibit features a sampling of documents from all regions of the National Archives.

0
♥ 0
987 reads

Looking Back on the American Century February 5 � April 30, 2000 In 1940 publisher Henry Luce used the phrase "the American Century" to describe the emergence of the United States as the preeminent world power. Beginning with the accession of a young and energetic Theodore Roosevelt to the Presidency in 1901, the United States began to turn its vast resources onto the world stage. Since that time, through world wars, depression, boom times, social upheavals, scientific and technological developments, and cultural trends, the United States vigorously placed its stamp of influence on the 20th Century. This exhibition presents a small taste of the American Century.

0
♥ 0
831 reads

During the debates on the adoption of the Constitution, its opponents repeatedly charged that the Constitution as drafted would open the way to tyranny by the central government. Fresh in their minds was the memory of the British violation of civil rights before and during the Revolution. They demanded a "bill of rights" that would spell out the immunities of individual citizens.

0
♥ 0
1,072 read

Drafted by Thomas Jefferson between June 11 and June 28, 1776, the Declaration of Independence is at once the nation's most cherished symbol of liberty and Jefferson's most enduring monument. Here, in exalted and unforgettable phrases, Jefferson expressed the convictions in the minds and hearts of the American people. The political philosophy of the Declaration was not new; its ideals of individual liberty had already been expressed by John Locke and the Continental philosophers.

0
♥ 0
752 reads

The Federal Convention convened in the State House (Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on May 14, 1787, to revise the Articles of Confederation. Because the delegations from only two states were at first present, the members adjourned from day to day until a quorum of seven states was obtained on May 25. Through discussion and debate it became clear by mid-June that, rather than amend the existing Articles, the Convention would draft an entirely new frame of government. All through the summer, in closed sessions, the delegates debated, and redrafted the articles of the new Constitution.

0
♥ 0
912 reads

In 1761, fifteen years before the United States of America burst onto the world stage with the Declaration of Independence, the American colonists were loyal British subjects who celebrated the coronation of their new King, George III. The colonies that stretched from present-day Maine to Georgia were distinctly English in character although they had been settled by Scots, Welsh, Irish, Dutch, Swedes, Finns, Africans, French, Germans, and Swiss, as well as English. As English men and women, the American colonists were heirs to the thirteenth-century English document, the Magna Carta, which established the principles that no one is above the law (not even the King), and that no one can take away certain rights.

0
♥ 0
766 reads

"American Originals" is a changing exhibit that has presented the nation's greatest documentary treasures in the Rotunda of the National Archives Building since December 1995. Over the years, the exhibit has featured the first printing of the Declaration of Independence, the police blotter listing Abraham Lincoln's assassination, the first report of the Titanic's collision with an iceberg, Rosa Parks's arrest records, and many other items. Both famous and rare, these documents provide unique insights into the towering figures and events that have shaped U.S. history.

0
♥ 0
741 reads

Here will be preserved all . . . the records that bind State to State and the hearts of all our people in an indissoluble union. --President Herbert Hoover, upon laying the cornerstone of the National Archives Building, February 20, 1933 American Originals presents some of the most treasured documents in the holdings of the National Archives. They have passed through the hands of George Washington, Helen Keller, Wyatt Earp, Napoleon, Rosa Parks, and John Hancock, connecting us physically to another moment in time. While some of the documents announce their own importance with a grand design, others quietly mark a revolution.

0
♥ 0
925 reads

Here will be preserved all . . . the records that bind State to State and the hearts of all our people in an indissoluble union. --President Herbert Hoover, upon laying the cornerstone of the National Archives Building, February 20, 1933 In 1803 the young republic nearly doubles in size with the Louisiana Purchase. A casualty list of the 54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment reveals the sacrifices of the most celebrated African-American regiment that fought in the Civil War. A police blotter lists the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, April 14, 1865.

0
♥ 0
987 reads

The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire "There is practically nothing left..." “At 5:13 o’clock A.M. of this 18th day of April 1906 San Francisco and vicinity was visited with a most violent earthquake shock.” The clerk of the U.S. District Court of San Francisco wrote these words in the court minute book, explaining why court was adjourned that day. His note describes one of the most devastating natural disasters in the history of the United States.

0
♥ 0
861 reads

About the Journal Medieval Philosophy and Theology is a semi-annual, peer-reviewed, online journal devoted to the publication of original articles in all areas of medieval philosophy, including logic and natural science, and in medieval theology, including Christian, Jewish, and Islamic. Coverage extends from the Patristic period through the neoscholasticism of the seventeenth century. Members of the Editorial Board and the panel of Editorial Advisors represent eleven different countries in Europe and North America, as well as a wide range of academic, disciplinary, and scholarly traditions and approaches. Medieval Philosophy and Theology occasionally publishes review articles and article-length critical discussions of important books in the field.

0
♥ 1
1,218 read

About the Project Introduction aking of America (MOA) represents a major collaborative endeavor to preserve and make accessible through digital technology a significant body of primary sources related to development of the U.S. infrastructure. Funded originally by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , MOA sought to involve research institutions and national consortia to develop common protocols and consensus for the selection, conversion, storage, retrieval, and use of digitized materials on a large, distributed scale. The initial phase of the project, begun in the fall of 1995, focused on developing a collaborative effort between Cornell University and the University of Michigan .

0
♥ 1
1,358 read

About Preservation News , represents a comprehensive history of the public undertakings of the National Trust for Historic Preservation of the United States and gives much of the background to the work and growth of the organization in areas such as the evolution of its organizational structure, the problems and issues that underpinned the fashioning and enactment of key historic preservation legislation, and the nature and progress of significant restoration projects and advocacy activities initiated in the US and abroad between 1961 and 1995. The journal is liberally interspersed with historic photographs of significant buildings and sites throughout the county with relevant commentary.

0
♥ 0
1,194 read

American Indian History and Culture The Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections features significant original materials on the history of native peoples of the Western hemisphere. Thousands of rare books document Indian life-ways, and manuscript materials provide documentation of the work of anthropologists, collectors, and ethnologists. The centerpiece of Cornell's American Indian holdings is the Huntington Free Library Native American Collection , a spectacular gathering of more than 40,000 volumes on the archaeology, ethnology and history of the native peoples of the Americas from the colonial period to the present.

0
♥ 0
890 reads

About The Oregon Daily Emerald (ODE) Archives is a full text searchable database of past ODE issues. The current collection began with issues in September 2005. At this time, there are no plans to digitize older issues of the Oregon Daily Emerald. An Oregon Daily Emerald Photograph Archives is coming soon. ODE Photographs can be purchased from ODE at http://reprints.dailyemerald.com . All material is copyrighted by Oregon Daily Emerald Publishing Co., Inc. Visit the Oregon Daily Emerald website. Last revision: 10/09/2011 1501 Kincaid Street, Eugene, OR 97403-1299 | T: (541) 346-3053 | F: (541) 346-3485

0
♥ 0
873 reads

About the Collection In preparation for its centennial in 2011, the OSU Extension Service interviewed several of its emeritus faculty in 2007 and 2008. These interviews help to tell the story of extension in Oregon during the 50 years after World War II. They cover areas including agriculture, 4-H, home economics, energy, community development, Sea Grant, communications, and administration and support. The original interviews and transcripts have been placed in the University Archives. Two additional interviews from the Archives’ collection, conducted in the 1980s and early 1990s, are also included. Interviews are available via the OSU Libraries’ streaming server. Transcripts and photographs are also available online. Interviews

0
♥ 0
919 reads

The Gerald W. Williams Collection In 2007 the OSU Libraries acquired the Gerald W. Williams Collection , consisting of the collected historic photographs, personal papers, and research library of Gerald "Jerry" Williams, former national historian for the U.S. Forest Service. Williams, a native Oregonian, spent much of his Forest Service career in the Pacific Northwest, prior to being appointed national historian in 1998. This digital collection includes some of the best imagery from the Williams Collection, including photos of the WWI era Spruce Production Division , logging photos of northwest Oregon taken by John Fletcher Ford , photos of Celilo Falls taken in 1956 by Jack Williams, and photos of depression era Civilian Conservation Corps camps and activities.

0
♥ 0
853 reads

Last updated: 14 January 2009 The Loss and Recovery of Greek Medicine in the West After the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century, most works of the Greek physicians were lost to Western Europe. In the 14th and 15th centuries, however, Western Europeans began to rediscover Greek scientific and medical texts. This was due in part to the discovery of Arab repositories of learning in Spain and elsewhere during the Crusades as well as the immigration to Italy of Byzantine scholars at the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

0
♥ 1
1,238 read